Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

For information you'd like to share - Post it here - not for questions
dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41878
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the 20th Century

Postby dognose » Wed Dec 12, 2012 9:49 am

At this point it may be worth making mention of the symbol used above the firm's name and address in the above post, as it is not the logo of The Jewellery & Metal Manufacturing Company of Ireland, but the Irish National Trade Mark.

Image

At the first All Ireland Industrial Conference that was held in Cork on the 21st and 22nd November 1905 it was decided that an Irish National Trade Mark should be established. An All Ireland Committee was there and then appointed to carry out this project and to register themselves as a corporate body to administer and control the proposed mark.

The British Parliament in 1906 passed the Trade Mark Act, and on the 31st July 1906 the Irish Industrial Development Association (Incorporated) registered with the Board of Trade and was authorized to issue licences to use the Trade Mark with the first being issued to the Belfast sewing thread manufacturers, Hicks, Bullick & Co. Ltd. on the 1st January 1907.

There were strict controls regarding the issue of the licences which were renewable annually. Businesses had to satisfy the association that Irish labour had to represent at least 50% of the total cost of manufacture and that where practicable the manufacturer use only, or for the main part, Irish raw materials in the making of their products. The association dealt with each application on its merits and any misuse of the mark was liable to prosecution.

The Gaelic inscription which is embodied into the Irish Trade Mark translates to 'Made in Ireland'.

As to whether any Irish silverware firm used the device as an additional mark on any of their products is yet to be seen by myself.

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41878
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the 20th Century

Postby dognose » Fri Dec 14, 2012 11:15 am

COSMACS Ltd.

Ennis Road, Limerick

Estabished in 1958 by G. Clancy, T. O'Brien, H. Sexton, and E. & T. McCarthy (the name 'Cosmacs' being an acronym of the surnames of the founders) they produced ecclesiastical silver, decanter labels, napkin rings, etc.

They were registered with the Dublin Assay Office, their mark being 'C · Ltd' in a dumbell shaped outline.

Image

Cosmacs Ltd. ceased business in 1964.

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41878
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the 20th Century

Postby dognose » Sat Dec 22, 2012 7:18 am

WEHRLY BROTHERS

2 & 3 O'Connell Street, Sligo

Wehrly Brothers were established by Adolph, Edward and Bartholomew Wehrly in 1875. They were clockmakers from the Black Forest region of Germany, and opened their first premises at Quay Street, and then at High Street, were they remained until 1900. Around the turn of the century, Bartholomew returned to Germany and the remaining two brothers opened a new shop at a premises at 3 Knox Street, now O'Connell Street, Sligo.

Edward died leaving no children, but Adolph had two sons, Frederick, who was a noted watchmaker and had spent time working for Rolex before coming back to work in the family business, and Edward, and it was they, along with Adolph's wife, Anastacia, who took over the running of the firm in the mid 1930's. Frederick died in 1978, and Edward in 2001.

By the 1980's the business was in the hand's of Edward's son, Tony. In the 1980's Wehrly Brothers acquired the adjoining premises at No. 2, O'Connell Street, that was formerly Young's Medical Hall.

Wehrly Brothers are still in business today.

Image

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41878
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the 20th Century

Postby dognose » Sun Dec 23, 2012 8:19 am

WEIR & SONS

3, Wicklow Street, Dublin

Image

Thomas Weir, born c.1846, arrived in Dublin from Glasgow in 1865, initially working as a jeweller for West & Sons at 18-19, Collage Green, Dublin. In 1869 he set up business in partnership with A. Rogers, the firm styled as Weir & Rogers, firstly at Fleet Street until 1871, and then at Andrew Street in 1872. That year also saw the break up of the partnership with both members of the former business registering separate marks with the Dublin Assay Office.

Thomas appears to have found premises, firstly at 5, Grafton Street, and then soon after, at what was to become their home for the next 140 years, the corner position of 3, Wicklow Street and 96, Grafton Street. By 1900, the firm was styled Thomas Weir & Sons, Thomas having taken five of his seven sons into the business.

The business was expanded greatly during the first half of the 20th century to include branches at Cardiff, Swansea, Manchester (each run by one of Thomas's sons) Nottingham and London. They were also to take over the business of Sharman D. Neill at Belfast. However, this continued expansion was not to last, and with the war clouds gathering in in the late 1930's, Thomas Weir & Sons, now under the control of Thomas's son, Jack, disposed of all of their branches and maintained the Dublin shop only.

At least three members of the Weir family have served as Warden to the Company of Goldsmiths of Dublin, Thomas, his son, Jack, and his son, Kenneth.

Example of the work of Thomas Weir & Sons from 1925:

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image


Retailer mark of Weir & Sons, noted on a John Smyth spoon assayed at Dublin in1908:

Image

See: http://www.925-1000.com/IrishRetailers_1.html


Image
Transit box c.1930

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41878
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the 20th Century

Postby dognose » Sun Dec 23, 2012 9:27 am

J. WEIR & SONS

3, Wicklow Place, Dublin

James Arthur Weir and John Hunt Weir, trading as J. Weir & Sons, of 3, Wicklow Place, Dublin, entered a mark ('J. W & S' contained within a flattened oval punch) with the Chester Assay Office on the 5th November 1901. Their private residence was recorded as Glanmore, Rathdown Road, Dublin.

As Thomas Weir's (see above post) two eldest sons were named James and John, this likely identifies them to that family, with perhaps the Wicklow 'Place' address being a transcription error in the assay office records.

The business of 'J. Weir & Sons' appears to working for the period c.1901 to c.1915.


The Irish Census of 1901 reveals James A. Weir as a 28 year old Jeweller and Merchant, born in Dublin City, living at the house of his widowed mother, Elizabeth M. Weir, aged 54 years, who was born in Dublin Co.. Also present was his brother John H. Weir, described as a 23 year old Jeweller and Merchant, born in Dublin Co., brothers, George T. Weir aged 14 years and Andrew H. Weir aged 9 years, sisters, Mary E. Weir aged 26 years, described as a Assistant in Jewellers, and Phyllis F. Weir aged 18 years. The family's religion was noted as Presbyterian. Also present in the household was Elizabeth's unmarried sister, 62 year old Ellen Hugher, this may reveal Elizabeth's Maiden name. The family's address was recorded as 26, Rathdown Road, Dublin.

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41878
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the 20th Century

Postby dognose » Mon Dec 24, 2012 10:55 am

NEWBRIDGE CUTLERY COMPANY

Newbridge Cutlery Company
Newbridge
Co. Kildare
Republic of Ireland

Image

In the early 1900's the town of Newbridge, Co. Kildare was a thriving garrison community. This all changed when the British army moved out in 1921, leaving a huge economical vacuum. As Newbridge entered the 1930's it was a town in crisis. The Irish Government, aware of the economic problems throughout Ireland, especially in the rural areas, encouraged the setting up of new manufacturing enterprises in the areas outside the major cities. With the assistance of the Irish Government, three men, a local school teacher, Senator Cummins, who was also a national leader of the labour party and William Norton and Joe McGrath Snr. took responsibility for the foundation of a new cutlery and flatware manufactory at Newbridge.

In 1934 the Newbridge Cutlery Company was founded and quickly established a reputation for its quality craftsmanship. From its foundation, until the 1970's, it was fortunate to benefit from tariff barriers imposed by the Irish Government that forbade foreign competition from importing their products into Ireland. During WWII, when there was a shortage of raw materials, the company acquired the old tram lines from Dublin to make their cutlery.

In the 1970's, following the lifting of the tariff barriers, the company, as well as all other European flatware manufacturers, suffered from the competition from cheap Far Eastern importers, and had no choice, but to downsize their business. It was at this time that Dominic Doyle joined the organisation as chief executive, and it was he that steered the company to become a more specialised business and into a niche market for quality tableware. However, the business was to suffer again through the recession years of the 1980's.

The 1990's that saw the rebirth of the company, now marketing under the name of Newbridge Silverware and taken over by William Doyle, his mother Monagh Doyle and sister Oonagh. They launched the range of Newbridge jewellery in 1995 and continue to manufacture silver plated flatware and cutlery.


What are very likely to be the marks of the Newbridge Cutlery Company:

Image

Image

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41878
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the 20th Century

Postby dognose » Tue Dec 25, 2012 12:53 pm

WILLIAM NASH

53, William Street, Dublin

A well-known house in an important line of business is that of Mr. Wm. Nash, of William Street, who for many years has carried on business as dressing case and jewel-case manufacturer at the above address. Founded more than twenty years ago, Mr. Nash has long achieved a high-class reputation for the admirable quality of his manufactures, and has been successful in forming a very important connection all over Ireland. The establshment so long and ably conducted by this enterprising tradesman, occupies very extensive premises at 53,William Street, which, being admirably fitted and stocked throughout, forms, from their handsome appearance, an attractive feature in the thoroughfare. The front of the house in William Street measures about thirty feet across, the depth internally, from the front to the rear, measuring as much as sixty feet. During the long period he has now been before the public, Mr. Nash has succeeded in rendering his establishment one of the most popular houses in the trade, never failing to give the most complete satisfaction to all customers patronising the house. The stock, which is very large and valuable, comprises a magnificent selection of jewel-cases, plate-chests, dressing-cases, and every description of fancy goods of a like character. All these articles are of a very superior style of workmanship, many of them being objects of high artistic merit, which, both in design and execution, entitles them to rank with the productions of the best houses either in London or in Paris. Many of the articles we had the privilege of inspecting were of rare beauty, especially some ladies' dressing-cases, which, in their silver-mounted fittings and leather or velvet linings, were about as choice specimens of this kind of production as we should ask to see. The plate-chests, too, although of a different stamp of work, were in their line no less admirable, being strong and serviceable, and eminently suited for the purpose for which they are intended. The premises cover a great extent of ground, the workshops occupying a flat of four apartments, well lighted and ventilated, and in every way models of what workshops ought to be. Mr. Nash is a considerable employer of labour, both men and women being engaged in the manufacture of the various articles made, all of them being well skilled in their work, and carefully selected for the various branches at which they are employed. A very large trade is done, as we have already remarked, all over the country in the sale of jewel-cases and dressing-boxes, there being few fancy shopkeepers who have not had dealings with the house. Besides the sale of articles of his own manufacture, Mr. Nash does a very extensive business in repairing all kinds of leather and velvet work in connection with the trade, such as re-covering, worn velvet or leather linings in dressing-cases or work-boxes, or in plate-cases. The manner in which such work entrusted to him has been executed at his establishment has given always the greatest satisfaction, promptitude and punctuality being distinctive features about Mr.' Nash's method of doing business. We regret not being able to devote more space to a full review of this interesting business, and especially in giving a detailed description of some of the very attractive goods in stock; but we are unfortunately precluded from doing so, owing to the necessarily limited scope of our review.
We feel how inadequately a sketch like this can convey an impression of a very important and representative house, and must content ourselves with merely calling the attention of the public generally, and our readers in particular, to it. N.B.–The trade only supplied.


Source: Industries of Dublin - 1887

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41878
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the 20th Century

Postby dognose » Wed Dec 26, 2012 11:55 am

JOHN MILLER

17, Duke Street, Dublin

A 1940 advertisement from this business was worded thus:

MEDALS for Tipperary County and Divisional Championships, and also
All-Ireland and National League Hurling and Football Championships,
Manufactured by
JOHN MILLER
Jeweller and Medallist
17, Duke Street, Dublin
"Medallist to the Central Leinster and Connaght Councils"



in 1943:

MEDALS for the All-Ireland Hurling and Football Championships
Manufactured by JOHN MILLER Manufacturing Goldsmith, Jeweller and Medallist
Medallist to the Central, Leinster, Connacht and Munster Councils; Committees and County Boards
17, Duke Street, Dublin
Silver and E.P. Cups and Shields. Gold and Silver Medals to order.
Designs and patterns submitted. Watches, Clocks and Jewellery of all kinds repaired



in 1945, as above, but with additional:
'phone 21582


and in 1963:

JOHN MILLER
Every description of Gold and Silver Medals and Badges made to order.
Watches, Clocks and Jewellery of all kinds repaired. Diamonds, etc., Remounted.
Repairs and Medals at Lowest Prices.
Medalist to Primary Schools' League.
17, Duke Street, Dublin 2
Telephone 75950


The lynch pins of this business appear to be the O'Donnell family who have worked John Miller's for three generations, starting with Patrick O'Donnell who left Hopkins & Hopkins, having served his apprenticeship there, to work as a Hand Engraver for John Miller.

The firm were established at least since 1930, and are still in business today, and located at:
Image
John Miller/Brian O’ Donnell, Unit B 14 KCR Estate, Ravensdale Park, Dublin 12

John Miller was registered with the Dublin Assay Office, his mark being 'J.M' contained within an oblong punch with clipped corners.

Image
John Miller - Dublin - 1945

The above mark is often confused with that of the The Jewellery & Metal Manufacturing Company of Ireland (see above post), who were working in the same lines and at the same time as John Miller.


Image
John Miller - Dublin - 1958

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41878
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Thu Dec 27, 2012 7:38 am

JOHN JAMESON & SONS

87, Grafton Street, Dublin

Image
Jameson - Dublin - 1878

Image
Jameson - Dublin - 1892

J. Jameson & Sons, Watchmakers, Jewellers, and Silversmiths, 87, Grafton Street. A thoroughly representative house, in the old and respectable trade with which it has so long and so honourably been associated, is that of the well-known firm of John Jameson & Sons. Established in the year 1840, this highly respectable house has for nearly half a century been particularly distinguished by a large and daily increasing share of public patronage, and can, at the present moment, boast of a business connection which, both in point of numbers and in influence, may compare with that of any house in the kingdom. The firm occupy handsome and commodious premises. The interior fitting and decoration, etc., of this establishment has been conceived with great taste, reflecting the highest credit on the judgement of the designer, and admirably suited to the effectually display the large and valuable stock contained by this house. This stock, which is of a really comprehensive character, comprises all those articles of jewellery which are always to be procured at any first-class watchmaker's and jeweller's establishment, as well as many articles of a proprietary and special character. The trade done by this house is very extensive, the name and reputation of the firm's watches having spread far and near, and bringing them annually a considerable increase of custom. The connection, it will thus be seen, is not confined to city or suburban limits but extends to all parts of the kingdom, its ramifications having penetrated to most distant parts of the country. The stock, generally speaking, includes watches and clocks, articles of modern jewellery, and an assortment of plated goods. The watch-making branch, which of course, includes clocks and chronometers– is naturally the most extensive, and the firm holds a highly attractive supply which, for superiority of workmanship and moderate price, can hardly be equalled by any house in the trade. A speciality with this establishment is the firm's "school-boy's watch," warranted for ten years, and made in strong silver cases, well finished, durable, and key-less, which may be purchased at prices ranging from £2 to £3-10. This watch, which is an exceptional'y good timekeeper, and is of very admirable workmanship, is so strongly and powerfully put together, that it may be said it, as near as possible, defies the most persevering efforts of the most inquisitive representative of the 'genus' school-boy in his well-intentioned search after knowledge to discover "what its inside is like." A more deserving person, in whose interest they have also produced a strong and durable article, is–the workman. The watch especially made for this description of wearer is a singularly useful article, and one which will bear a considerable amount of "rough usage " inseparable from the working-man's mode of life. There are in stock a valuable and handsome collection of ladies' and gentlemen's gold hunting and other watches, which are both elegant in design and durable in their quality, and any of our readers in want of one of those articles so indispensable in a gentleman's dress cannot do better than pay this well-known establishment of the firm a visit. There are also expensive clocks in bronze cases, also some exceedingly pretty ones in china-ware, etc. The jewellery department, which is very extensive, includes a lot of silver ornaments at very moderate prices. The firm are very large buyers of old gold and silver, which they purchase for cash, giving the fullest value. There is no establishment in the trade in Dublin which is better managed, more patronised, or more generally popular with all classes of customers.

Source: Industries of Dublin - 1887

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41878
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Fri Dec 28, 2012 9:50 am

M. ROCHE

61-62, Patrick Street, Cork

Image
M. Roche - Cork - c.1933

Image
M. Roche - Cork - 1940

Image
M. Roche - Cork - 1947


Image
M.R - Dublin - 1945

Image
M.R (Roche, Cork) - Dublin - 1945

M. Roche registered his mark, 'M.R' in an oblong punch, with the Dublin Assay Office. His mark is often to be found on medals made for sporting events at this period in time.

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41878
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Sat Dec 29, 2012 6:56 am

WILLIAM CHAMBERS JACOB

13, Suffolk Street, Dublin

Wm. Chambers Jacob, Jeweller, Silversmith, Watchmaker, and Optician, 13, Suffolk Street–A very influential house in the jewellery and watch-making line is that of Mr. Wm. Chambers Jacob, and which, despite the fact that it has been only a few years established, has received a large share of public patronage and support. Founded in 1882, Mr. Jacob's establishment has in the short space of six years achieved for itself a reputation and formed a connection that at once places it in the foremost rank among houses in this line of business, and, owing to the excellent quality of the goods it has for sale, does as fine a trade as any house in the city. The premises occupied by this noted house are of a very attractive appearance, the exterior of the shop being decorated in black and gold–a sombre tint of colour which all the more effectively displays the handsome goods within the window. The interior of the premises are fully equal to the exterior aspect of the house, being throughout fitted in a most tasteful manner, and are fully stocked with a magnificent assortment of clocks, watches and articles of jewellery, silver and electro-plate. The frontage of the shop is about fifteen feet across ; the interior depth, from front to rear, measuring about forty-five feet. The trade done by this establishment is very extensive, the ramifications of its influential connection penetrating to all parts of the city, and even to many quarters in the country itself. The connection is, as we have said, of a most influential character, many of the persons forming it moving in the most aristocratic circles in Dublin society, and a large trade being done among the gentry and professional classes. The stock, which is large, varied, and valuable, comprises clocks and watches of every description, jewellery, plate, and, in fact, every kind of article usually procurable at a first-class jeweller's establishment. The stock of watches and clocks is particularly deserving of notice, all being admirable specimens of workmanship; while among the latter are many which may be fairly looked upon as works of art. We were greatly struck with some beautiful specimens of dining-room clocks, the production of which reflects the highest credit on the artistic skill of the workman, and which, in beauty and finish, may fairly compare with the best Continental work of the same class. There are also some beautiful examples of workmanship in ladies' gold watches ; while the collection of rings, brooches, and bracelets leaves absolutely nothing to be desired. We must congratulate Mr. Jacob that, in the face of the abundant existing competition, his house has, in so short a time, achieved so fine a position ; and may conclude by bearing our testimony to the able and efficient manner in which the business is managed.

Source: Industries of Dublin - 1887


By lease dated the 5th June, 1883, James Rooney demised to William Chambers Jacob the house and premises No. 13, Suffolk Street, Dublin, for twenty-five years at the rent of £150 a-year, payable quarterly on every 1st January, 1st April, 1st July, and 1st October.

Source: The Irish Reports - Incorporated Council of Law Reporting for Ireland - 1902


William Chambers Jacob is thought to have died at Dublin in 1914. He was likely to have been the son of the Jeweller and Watchmaker, John Gibbon Jacob of Church Street, Liverpool.

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41878
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Sun Dec 30, 2012 4:36 pm

STEPHEN FALLER Ltd.

Williamsgate Street, Galway

Stephen Faller (b.1855) established his watchmaking and jewellery business at Galway in 1879, his first shop being located in Dominick Street. Faller soon built up a steady business gaining a reputation amongst the townspeople for his unique Claddagh rings and reliable clocks.

Stephen Faller came to Galway from Germany, as did so many of his contemporaries, the advertisement below from 1892 shows him attempting to recruit staff from Germany:

Image
S. Faller - Galway - 1892


In 1899, Stephen Faller moved his flourishing business to new shop on Williamsgate Street.

By the 1960's the business was in the hands of Stephen's grandson, Cornelius (d.1992), and it was he who presented John F. Kennedy and Jackie Kennedy, during their visit to Galway in 1963, with a pair of Claddagh rings made in workshops of Fallers.

In 1986 Paul Faller became the Managing Director of Stephen Faller Ltd., thus becoming the fourth generation of Fallers to run the company.

The company is still in business today and still located in Williamsgate Street, Galway.

Image Image

Stephen Faller are registered with the Dublin Assay Office, their mark, 'SF' contained within an oblong punch with clipped corners is shown below:

Image

In 1906 they entered a mark, 'FALLER GALWAY' contained within an oblong punch, with the Dublin Assay Office.

In 1926 they also entered a mark with the Chester Assay Office, 'S.F' contained within an oblong punch with clipped corners.


The Galway Golf Club have just entrusted Mr. G (?). Faller (the well-known Galway silversmith), with an order for a magnificent silver cup, which will be played for at their autumn meeting. The cup is finely chased and silver-mounted, with the figure of a golfer. This is the second order received within a few weeks by Mr. Faller, from the Galway Golf Club, as he also supplied the beautiful silver cup presented for competition to the club by the captain recently.

Source: Golf Illustrated - 2nd August 1901

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41878
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Mon Dec 31, 2012 9:06 am

WILLIAM FALLER

12, Strand Road, Londonderry, Northern Ireland

The business was founded in 1883 by Wilheim Faller (b.1860-d.1940), the brother of Stephen Faller (b.1855) (see above post) and was first located at 25, Ferryquay Street, Londonderry.

Wilheim Faller arrived in Ireland in 1876 from Schonwald in the Black Forest region of southern Germany where he had served a three year apprenticeship in clock making, and after spending two years selling clocks door to door with his elder brother in the Athlone area he moved to Derry in the North West of Ireland in 1878 where he continued the life of a travelling salesman. In 1883, Wilheim (now known as William) opened his first shop at 25, Ferryquay Street, Londonderry and from there sold and serviced clocks and started in the jewellery business, he was successful, and by 1897 employed six agents to sell his clocks throughout the counties of Derry and Donegal.

As did his brother Stephen, William also chose to recruit his staff from Germany:

Image
Wm. Faller - Londonderry - 1892

In 1902, William Faller designed and had erected at a cost of £970, the purpose built jewellery store, overlooking the River Foyle at 12, Strand Road, that is the home of Fallers to this very day. All the original mahogany counters and show cabinets are still in use.

William continued to run a successful business, despite a world war and the partition of Ireland, up until his death in April 1940. He was fortunate enough to avoid the blanket internment of German nationals at the outbreak of WWII.

Following William's demise, control of the business fell to his youngest son, Stephen Faller (b.1908-d.1999), who had joined the firm as a fifteen year old in 1923. Stephen was a qualified Watchmaker, Clockmaker, and Jeweller, and in 1931 also qualified as an Optician. It was he who kept the business afloat during the wartime difficulties and the heavy restrictions of post war shortages.

Image

The early 1990's saw the firm in the hands of Stephen's son, Noel, a qualified Jeweller who joined the family business in 1971. Today, Fallers are jewellery manufacturers employing five goldsmiths working under the direction of the designer goldsmith Una Carlin who has been with the company since 1996.

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41878
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Mon Dec 31, 2012 2:06 pm

H. L. STEWART

104, George Street, Limerick


H. L. STEWART, Manufacturing Jeweller, Watchmaker, and Optician, 104, George Street, Limerick. One of the most attractive establishments in George Street, Limerick's most fashionable business thoroughfare, is that of Mr. H. L. Stewart, the high-class Art Goldsmith, Jeweller, Silversmith, and Watchmaker, the business having been established by the father of the present proprietor about a quarter of a century ago. The premises occupied by Mr. Stewart comprise a splendid shop with spacious frontage, the plate-glass window affording every accommodation for the attractive display of the magnificent stock. This consists of ladies' and gentlemen's gold and silver watches, and an elegant assortment of silver and electroplated goods, including a variety of waiters, trays, fish knives and forks, dessert knives, lock-up spirit frames, salad bowls, revolving cover dishes, fish carvers, saltcellars, cruet frames, toast racks, entree dishes, kettles and stands of the newest patterns, both quite plain and splendidly chased, engraved, and embossed. There is also a large stock of jewellery of artistic design and superior workmanship, comprising brooches, bracelets, chains, diamond crescents and stars for the hair; dress and other rings composed of pearls, rubies, emeralds, opals, sapphires, diamonds, and other gems. The interior of the establishment is fitted with appointments of a superior description, and the goods are arranged for inspection with conspicuous taste and judgement. A much appreciated speciality of the house is the large selection of novelties in bijouterie, and the constant succession of the same. Articles specially suited for wedding, christening, and birthday gifts, as well as presentation and prize plate, form an attractive feature of the stock, careful attention being devoted by the principal to this branch of the business. The repairing department supplies another important detail, skilled and competent workmen being retained for the execution of repairs to watches, chronometers, plate, and jewellery, and the rearranging and re-mounting of gem ornaments of every description. The connection of the house includes the leading families of the City and county, as well as many of the aristocracy of other parts of Ireland, and the courtesy and attention of the principal, who personally superintends the establishment, has been recognised by a satisfactory and ever-increasing amount of popular and well-deserved support. We may add that Mr. Stewart also successfully controls a branch business at Church Street, Ennis.

Source: Dublin, Cork, and South of Ireland: A Literary, Commercial, and Social Review - 1892


Henry L. Stewart entered his mark, 'HLS' contained within an oblong punch, with the Dublin Assay Office in 1889.

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41878
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Tue Jan 01, 2013 7:10 am

J. McDOWELL

19, Mary Street, Dublin

J. McDowell, Practical Watchmaker and Jeweller, 19, Mary Street, opposite Todd, Burns, & Co.– This is one of the most attractive shops In Mary Street. The establishment has a fine exterior, with a frontage of twenty five feet, and the inside, measuring twenty-five by forty-five, is very capacious and so affords Mr. McDowell the opportunity of having his manufactory beside his salerooms, which of course represenls a saving of much time. The number of hands engaged by Mr. McDowell in the manufacture of his goods, and in the repairing of injured or broken watches, clocks, chains, etc., is half-a-dozen, and they turn out their work in a most creditable manner. The exhibition of goods in the windows and in the cases fixed around ihe inside walls, shows a very high order of workmanship. Amongst the clocks, one specially notices a number of beautifully designed and excellently finished marble and drawing-room ones resting under glass shades on embossed stands, whilst in other parts of the shop are displayed hundreds of others, varying in size from the large old-fashioned hall clocks down to the smallest and newest alarm clocks. Of watches, gold and silver, large and small, an extensive slock is always on hand, and the rings of every description and for every purpose seem indeed innumerable, while the prices attached to them are as low as can be obtained in any house in the city. A speciality is made of wedding and guard rings, a large selection sold by weight. The selection of brooches, earrings, studs, snuff-boxes, perfume and card cases, gold, silver, and hair chains, is also very fine. The house is now ten years established, and for the last five years has made a speciality of Connemara marble. This beautiiul stone is skilfully worked by Mr. McDowell into all kinds of ornaments, and his show of brooches, studs, etc., set with this marble is particularly beautiful, varied, and interesting. The shop is very neat and comfortable, and customers will receive the greatest attention both from Mr. McDowell and from his assistants.

Source: Industries of Dublin - 1887


This business should not be confused with that of McDowell Brothers (see above post), who made a point of noting in their advertisements that they were not connected with any firm of the same name.

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41878
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Tue Jan 01, 2013 1:51 pm

WEST & SON

18-19, College Green, Dublin

Image

West & Son, Diamond Merchants, Goldsmiths, Jewellers, Silversmiths, Electroplaters, and Watchmakers, by Special Appointment to Her Most Illustrious Majesty the Queen, and the Most Illustrious Order of St. Patrick, 18 and 19, College Green. Telegraphic address, Diamonds, Dublin; Telephone, 528.–

This distinguished firm was founded in the last century, originally under the title of Matthew West, of Skinner's Row, afterwards Clarke & West, of Capel Street, subsequently West & Son, of the same address, and finally of 18 and 19, College Green. The house has from its inception been justly celebrated for the superiority of its manufactures, the name it bears being a guarantee of excellence in all that pertains to the jeweller's and silversmith's art ; in fact, the firm has always prided itself upon keeping none but first-class goods in stock, such as are to be obtained in the best London houses, and for this reason it soon gained the confidence of the public, and quickly established a prosperous business. The firm occupies extensive premises, built expressly for the business in 1845, and the massive appearance presented by the solid cut granite building, of which we give an illustration, forms a striking feature in the thoroughfare. The show-rooms are of considerable size. the front one alone measuring about sixty-two feet in depth by forty-two feet wide, and are admirably planned and fitted up with a view to the attractive display of the choice and valuable stock. Within the last few years the shop has been entirely refitted, at a cost, we understand, of some thousands of pounds, the ebonised and gilt woodwork, and the large sheets of plate-glass, which form the show-cases, being designed and modelled after the very latest style. The effect produced by the numerous mirrors, the wall-cases, windows, and counters filled with plate and jewellery, is, particularly when the lamps are lit, most attractive, and we doubt if there is anything prettier of the kind to be seen in the kingdom. In each of the departments purchasers may feel confident of finding an ample selection to choose from ; jewellery of every description, siIver and plated ware, gold and silver watches, clocks, suitable for dining-rooms, drawing-rooms, and studies, all are temptingly displayed. Messrs. West & Son are, however, perhaps most celebrated for their stocks of Diamond Ornaments, Gem Rings, and Antique Plate, which are undoubtedly the finest we have seen in Ireland, and to these branches of their business they devote special attention. To a great extent the various items which constitute the stock are of necessity imported, clocks from Paris, watches from London and Geneva, electro-plate from Sheffield, but wherever it is possible to make the goods in Dublin, such as diamond jewellery and siver plate (which can be as well and as cheaply produced here as in England), home manufacture is well represented. Celtic Jewellerv forms a special feature of their manufactures, including not only copies of antiques, that have been discovered from time to time throughout the country, but also original designs of their own, many of which are made of gold found in the Co. Wicklow, and set with fine specimens of Irish pearls. It is gratifying to know that the firm has received from every quarter the warmest support in its successful efforts to produce high-class goods, and to prove to the Irish public that they can obtain what they require as good in quality and at as reasonable prices at home as abroad. Messrs. West & Son hold several warrants of appointment, one from Queen Adelaide, dated 1830, two from Her Majesty the Queen, and others from various Lord Lieutenants ; besides which a Prize Medal was awarded to them at the Great Exhibition of 1851. They are also jewellers by special appointment to the Most Illustrious Order of St. Patrick, for which Order they have made, several gold collars, including those recently supplied to their Royal Highnesses the Dukes of Edinburgh and Connaught and Prince Albert Victor of Wales. Diamond badges and stars have, moreover, been manufactured for many of the Knights. Of course, a great number of presentations are annually purchased from them, besides which they alone supply the prizes every year to the two principal tennis clubs in Ireland, viz., the Fitzwilliam and the Howth; indeed, Messrs. West have been fortunate in forming a connection which, both in point of magnitude and influence, may favourably compare with that of any house in the trade, and which numbers within its circle of supporters the majority of the nobility, gentry, and merchants of the country. Although of late years keen competition, and a determination on the part of purchasers to obtain the best possible value for ready money, have shown Messrs. West the necessity of going with the times, and of reducing their prices all round, being content with a rate of profit which would never have paid in the old days of unlimited credit, yet the same rule of keeping nothing except what is really first-class, and calculated to reflect credit on the establishment, is still adhered to. In conclusion we may say that the firm, which is the oldest of the kind in Ireland, is undoubtedly an honour and credit to the city, and one that the inhabitants may well feel proud of ; and as long as we can point to such houses we may safely assert that there is but little fear of Dublin losing its position as a mercantile and commercial centre. Indeed, the fact that such establishments not only exist but flourish in our midst is a striking proof that the country is by no means in the desperate condition pessimists would have us to believe. We have only to add, we strongly advise such of our readers as require anything in Messrs. West & Son's line to pay their house a visit and judge for themselves.


Source: Industries of Dublin - 1887


Image
West & Son - Dublin - 1878


WEST & SON, Diamond Merchants, Goldsmiths, Jewellers, Silversmiths, Electroplaters, Watchmakers, (by special appointments to Her Majesty the Queen, the Irish Courts, and the Most Illustrious Order of St. Patrick), 18 and 19, College Green, Dublin. Telegraphic Address–" Diamonds, Dublin." Telephone No. 528.

This celebrated house, which was founded early in the last century by Matthew West, of Skinner's Row, and holds Royal Appointments for over 100 years, now occupies extensive premises, built expressly for the business in 1845, in College Green, where the solid cut granite front presents a most imposing appearance, while the splendid showrooms–which have lately been remodelled at an outlay of some thousands of pounds– are magnificently fitted up, the ebonized and plate-glass cases and counters having been specially designed for the attractive display of the choice and valuable stock. In every department purchasers may feel confident of finding an ample selection to choose from; but perhaps Messrs. West are most celebrated for their stocks of diamond ornaments, gem rings, presentation plate, and antique silver, which are, undoubtedly, the finest in the country.

To a great extent the various items of stock are, of necessity, imported, but whenever it is possible to make the goods in Dublin - such as diamond ornaments and silver plate - home manufacture is well represented and to this is due the fact that so many public presentations have been entrusted to the firm, one of the last and most important being the silver cradle presented to the Lady Mayoress by the citizens of Dublin. Celtic jewellery forms a special feature of its manufactures, including both copies of antiques and original designs of its own, many of which are made of Wicklow gold and set with fine specimens of Irish pearls. Although of late Messrs. West have revised, and very considerably reduced, the prices of all their goods, with the view of giving the best possible value for cash payments, yet the same rule for keeping nothing but first-class goods is rigidly adhered to; indeed, the fact of any article having been purchased from them is a sufficient guarantee of its excellence.

As proof that the firm - which is under the personal management of Mr. L.A. West, Master of Goldsmiths' Hall - intends to keep well abreast of the times, we may mention that it has just been published the largest and finest illustrated catalogue ever issued by any jewellers and silversmiths in the United Kingdom.


Source: Dublin, Cork, and South of Ireland: A Literary, Commercial, and Social Review - 1892


Image
West & Son - Dublin - 1917

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41878
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Tue Jan 01, 2013 2:48 pm

ALWRIGHT & MARSHALL

14, Fade Street, Dublin

An example of the work of Alwright & Marshall:

Image
Alwright & Marshall - 1933

Image
Alwright & Marshall - Dublin - 1933

Alwright & Marshall's premises at 14, Fade Street, Dublin, are the former workshops of West & Son.

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41878
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Wed Jan 02, 2013 1:14 pm

JOHN E. LEDBETTER

21, Essex Quay, Dublin

John E. Ledbetter, Practical 'Watchmaker and Jeweller, 21, Essex Quay.– The establishment of Mr. Ledbetter, situated on Essex Quay, is an old and most respectable house of business devoted to the jewellery trade, and is conducted by a thoroughly practical gentleman who understands the trade in every particular, and mostly all the watches offered for sale are examined on the premises, and under his immediate superintendence. The establishment occupies a most central position in the city on Essex Quay, adjoining some of the principal streets, such as Parliament, Dame, and Capital Streets, and is highly suited for the watchmaking and jewellery business. It has been long established, being now about fifty years since first started in the line of trade now followed, and during that period has done an extensive business, and is well known for the superior quality of its goods. In the watchmaking department a most select and elegant stock is always on exhibition, comprising " own make " in variety, and of the choicest description, celebrated for accuracy and moderate cost, besides several choice selections, the production of the best English and continental, as well as American manufactures, all of which have been purchased on most advantageous terms to suit a competitive trade, and are here offered to the public at lowest possible profits. In other articles of jewellery, rings, brooches, pins, necklets, etc., an endless variety in designs and prices is here to be seen and certain to command a ready sale to those likely to invest in such materials. An extensive and long-established trade is attached to the firm, which is observably and agreeably on the increase, and the worthy and artistic proprietor spares no pains to serve his many customers of every class.

Source: Industries of Dublin - 1887

Established in 1830.

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41878
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Wed Jan 02, 2013 1:41 pm

G. A. McGUINNESS

28, High Street, Dublin

G. A. McGUINNESS, Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith, Electroplater and Gilder, 28, High Street, Dublin.
An important department of industrial art is represented by Mr. G. A. McGuinness, the well-known watchmaker, jeweller, and silversmith, etc., of whose business history we present this brief outline to our readers. Mr. McGuinness commenced operations at his present address, 28, High Street, about eight years ago, and during that comparatively brief period has succeeded in firmly establishing a first-class all-round trade of the most promising and satisfactory character. The premises are of spacious proportions and very effectively appointed, a handsome double-faced clock forming one of the exterior attractions of the establishment and supplying a distinctive feature of the thoroughfare. The interior is neatly fitted with elegant show cases for the display of the high-class stock submitted for inspection, and the windows are arranged with tasteful effect. The various departments of the business include dining and drawing-room clocks and timepieces in gilt ormolu and bronze; ladies' and gentlemen's gold and silver watches; gold and gem jewellery in all the newest and most fashionable designs; silver and electroplated goods; and an infinite variety of useful and ornamental articles suitable for presentation.

The operative branches of the business include watch, clock, and jewellery repairing; optical instruments; stick and pipe mounting; and a leading speciality in ecclesiastical gilding and lacquering. This work is executed with the highest skill, and obtained a Certificate of Merit at the Artisans' Exhibition in 1885. An extensive and influential circle of patronage has been secured by Mr. McGuinness, which includes many of the leading gentry resident in the City and suburbs, and the business done in each department affords a gratifying indication of the estimation in which the productions of this gentleman are held in the district.


Source: Dublin, Cork, and South of Ireland: A Literary, Commercial, and Social Review - 1892

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41878
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Wed Jan 02, 2013 2:07 pm

JAMES MOSLEY & SONS

97 and 98, Quay; and Exchange Street, Waterford

Image

JAMES MOSLEY & SONS, Watchmakers, Jewellers, Silversmiths, and Electroplaters, 97 and 98, Quay; and Exchange Street, Waterford. This thriving centre of commercial activity in the South of Ireland possesses no more attractive establishments than that conducted by Messrs. James Mosley And Sons, the well-known Watchmakers, Jewellers, and Silversmiths, 97 and 98, Quay, and Exchange Street, whose extended connection with the trade of the City amply justifies the prominence assigned to them in this work. The history of the house dates back to 1832, when it was founded by the grandfather of the present proprietor. The establishment is centrally situated on the Quay facing the river, and forms a noted feature of the attractions of this fine thoroughfare. The premises comprise two handsome and commadious shops, effectively decorated in black and gold, and appointed throughout in recherche style with elegant ebonized show cases and other fittings, designed to exhibit to the utmost advantage the magnificent stock of high-class goods submitted for inspection. The window frontage is exceptionally attractive, and displays in great profusion a choice assortment of highclass drawing-room clocks, gold and gem jewellery, diamond ornaments, watches, silver and electroplated goods for presentation, etc., of which special mention must be made of a fine service of plate, on view at the date of our visit, intended for presentation to a local minister, and gifts of a similar character for another gentleman in the district, the whole forming a display in no sense inferior to that of the leading West End establishments of the Metropolis itself. Special mention must be made of the magnificent display of diamond jewellery and ornaments, Messrs. Mosley purchasing entirely on cash terms, being enabled to offer exceptional advantages to buyers of these coveted and much-prized gems. Spacious workrooms in the rear are devoted to the operative departments of the business, an important feature of which is the total exclusion of apprentice labour in the establishment, none but experienced and practical workmen being employed, in order to ensure that the valuable watches and clocks entrusted to the firm for repairs, etc., shall not be placed in the hands of incompetent youths for the purpose of acquiring a knowledge of their art. In this respect we believe this house to be an exception to any other establishment in the kingdom. Additional workshops have recently been provided by Messrs. Mosley, and fully equipped with the newest and most improved plant for gilding and electroplating; the shafting, dynamos, and other machinery deriving motive power from a powerful Crossley's gas engine, the whole of the arrangements being the most complete of any provincial establishment in Ireland. The firm is also extensively engaged in the manufacture to order of plate for presentation, etc., a staff of experienced workmen being retained on the premises for this branch of the business. The establishment is lighted by electricity throughout, which is generated by the firm's own engine, and will at all times be found well worthy of the attention of visitors to the City.

Source: Dublin, Cork, and South of Ireland: A Literary, Commercial, and Social Review - 1892


Image
James Mosley & Sons - Waterford - 1893


James Mosley entered his mark, 'MOSLEY' contained within an oblong punch, with the Dublin Assay Office in 1892.

Trev.


Return to “Contributors' Notes”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest