Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths and Other Employees

For information you'd like to share - Post it here - not for questions
dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41069
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Postby dognose » Wed Dec 31, 2008 10:51 am

George Turner (Jackson p.305) Exeter as at July 1818
Giles Tozer (position unknown)

Giles Tozer died in early August 1818. His death was a result of his attempt to rescue three men who had been overcome by fumes during the construction of a sewer in Exeter.

Source: The Annual Register.
Edited by Edmund Burke, 1819.


Trev.
.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41069
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Postby dognose » Thu Jan 08, 2009 5:29 pm

William Eley (II) (Grimwade 3102, 3109, 3110, 3113) as at c.1824
John Cutmore* (Superintendent of Works),(Grimwade 1796)
James Littler Barritt** (Die Sinker)
James Price*** (Position Unknown)

*John Cutmore was Superintendent of William Eley's works until 1829 when in appears he went into partnership with Thomas Cutmore and took over William Eley's premises at 3, Lovell's Court. Following this enterprise he was to become Superintendent at the manufactory of Bateman & Ball, a position he held for fourteen years.

** James Littler Barritt served an apprenticeship with Rundell, Bridge & Rundell. He was later to become a partner of William Eley(II) in a business embossing leather bookcovers. (See: viewtopic.php?t=18959).

*** James Price had been a servant to the Eleys for most of his life and may have performed many roles. He was employed first by William Eley (I), and then William Eley (II). In 1841 he told the inquest into the death of William Eley (II) that he had worked for William (II) and his father for a period of thirty-four years. In the 1851 Census, William Thomas Eley (Son of Wiliam Eley (II)) is recorded as living at 38, Broad Street, where he had a seventy-four year old servant named James Price.

Source:
Eley Cartridges, A History of the Silversmiths And Ammunition Manufacturers by C.W. Harding.

Nineteenth Century Silver by John Culme.

London Goldsmiths 1697-1837 Their Marks & Lives by Arthur G. Grimwade.


Trev.
.
Last edited by dognose on Wed Jan 06, 2010 5:32 am, edited 1 time in total.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41069
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Postby dognose » Mon Jan 12, 2009 1:38 pm

William Robert Smily as at July 1852
Thomas Smily (Clerk)
William Booth
Robert Crisp (Wedding Ring Keeper Maker)

William Robert Smily died in 1858 aged 34, upon his death the business was taken over by his brother Thomas Smily.

Source: Old Bailey Court Records

Trev.
.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41069
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Postby dognose » Tue Jan 13, 2009 5:44 pm

Samuel Hayne & Dudley Cater (Grimwade 2546) as at October 1838
Lewis Theophilus Bell
Joseph West

Source: Old Bailey Court Records

Trev.
.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41069
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Postby dognose » Fri Jan 23, 2009 6:50 am

John Baynes (Newcastle) as at August 1599
Thomas Royd (Apprentice)

John Baynes (Newcastle) as at February 1600
John Nicholson (Apprentice)

Trev.
.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41069
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Postby dognose » Fri Jan 23, 2009 5:44 pm

The Apprentices’ of Francis Batty II of Newcastle

Francis Batty II inherited his father’s silversmithing business upon his death in 1706. His father, Francis Batty I was one of the leading silversmiths of his time in Newcastle and was the Assay Master for the Newcastle Company of Goldsmiths for the period 1702-1706. Francis Batty II continued the family reputation and was also one of the leading lights of the Newcastle Assay Office. Francis Batty II died in 1728.

Below is a list of the known apprentices of Francis Batty II.

Robert Makepeace. Son of Thomas Makepeace of Newcastle. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 2nd February 1707. Robert Makepeace was later to enter into a short partnership with his former master during the years 1719-1720. Robert Makepeace died in 1755.

John Carnaby. Son of William Carnaby of Newcastle. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 24th June 1709. He continued his employment with Batty as a journeyman after completing his apprenticeship. In 1718 he went into business on his own account and in 1726 became an Inn-keeper. He died in 1733.

Henry Martin. Son of Mark Martin of Newcastle. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 25th March 1710.

Michael Jenkins. Son of Henry Jenkins. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 1st September 1714.

George Bulman. Son of George Bulman. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 25th February 1717. He also continued his employment as a journeyman until Batty’s demise in 1728. As from 1728 he went into business for himself. He died in 1743. His death was caused by drowning, at the time George Bulman was in a great deal of debt. Following his death, his wife was incarcerated in Newgate Prison and in 1745 while still in Newgate the Newcastle Company of Goldsmiths made a donation of half a guinea to her to ease her sufferings.

Isaac Cookson. Son of William Cookson of Penrith. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 1st October 1720. Following the completion of his apprenticeship, Isaac Cookson went to London to improve his skills. On hearing of his old masters death, he returned to Newcastle and purchased Francis Batty’s shop, tools and half the stock. He built up a flourishing business and became the most famous Newcastle silversmith of his time. He died in 1754.

George Hetherington. Son of Nicholas Hetherington, late of Brampton in Gilsland, County of Cumberland. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 30th October 1723. Francis Batty died during the period of George Hetherington’s apprenticeship and he elected to finish his term under the guidance of George Bulman who had been journeyman to Batty.


Trev.
.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41069
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Postby dognose » Sun Jan 25, 2009 12:04 pm

The Journeymen of Francis Batty II of Newcastle

John Carnaby Known to have been working 1716-1718.

James Richards Known to have been working November 1718.

John Sharpling Known to have been working August 1719.

Thomas Prow Known to have been working November 1722.

George Bulman Known to have been working 1724-1728.

Trev.
.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41069
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Postby dognose » Sun Jan 25, 2009 3:19 pm

The Apprentices of Isaac Cookson of Newcastle

Isaac Cookson not only took over the business of Francis Batty II, but also his position as Warden of the Newcastle Assay Office following the death of his former master in 1728.

Below is a list of known apprentices of Isaac Cookson.

Edward French Son of William French of Newburn. Edward French had been indentured to Jonathan French for a period of seven years as from 18th April 1727. Following the death of Jonathan French in 1733, William French elected to serve the remainder of his term under Isaac Cookson.

Thomas Stoddart Son of John Stoddart of Newcastle. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 1st September 1728. Following the completion of his apprenticeship in 1735, Thomas Stoddart went into business on his own account. He died in 1763.

John Langlands Son of Reignold Langlands of Newcastle. Term of Indenture: Ten years as from 2nd October 1731. John Langlands worked for Isaac Cookson for twenty-three years and took over the business, along with another former apprentice and journeyman of Cookson, John Goodrick, after the death of Cookson in 1754. John Langlands was to go on to be the most famous of the Newcastle silversmiths.

Stephen Buckle Son of Joseph Buckle of York. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 27th April 1732. Stephen Buckle's father, Joseph was a goldsmith at York and following the closure of the York Assay Office in 1716, sent his manufactures to Newcastle for Assay. Following the completion of his apprenticeship, Stephen Buckle returned to York to work with his father. Stephen Buckle retired in 1774, his business was taken over by the York goldsmith Richard Clark.

Martin Hixon Son of John Hixon of Sedgefield. Term of Indenture: Seven years as of 20th March 1742.

John Goodrick Son of Francis Goodrick of Clifton, in the North Riding of the County of York. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 1st April 1743. John Goodrick became the first partner of John Langlands when they took over the business of Isaac Cookson. He died in 1757.

John Bell Son of Christopher Bell. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 1st August 1747.

William George Chalmers Son of the Rev. Mr. Chalmers of Kirkhaugh. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 1st July 1751.

James Robinson Son of John Robinson of Watermelock. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 1st November 1752.

Trev.
.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41069
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Postby dognose » Mon Jan 26, 2009 5:08 pm

The Journeymen of Isaac Cookson of Newcastle

Peter Johnson Known to be working February 1728

Charles Stoddart* Known to be working November 1728

John Goresuch Known to be working November 1730

.........Gillison/Gilson** Known to be working May 1740

Thomas Blacket*** Known to be working May 1740

John Langlands Known to be working May 1742

Martin Hixon Known to be working May 1750

* Probably the brother of Thomas Stoddart.
** Possibly Robert Gillson of Sunderland.
*** Thomas Blacket became Foreman at John Langlands

Trev.
.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41069
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Postby dognose » Fri Jan 30, 2009 7:34 am

The Apprentices of Jonathan French of Newcastle

Jonathan French was a Newcastle silversmith who served his apprenticeship under Robert Shrive. Following the death of the Newcastle Assaymaster Francis Batty (1) he was sent to London to learn the art of assaying by the Newcastle Company of Goldsmiths and was officially appointed Assaymaster on 13th September 1707.

Jonathan French seems to have had an up and down relationship with the Newcastle Assay Office, he served as Warden on several occasions, but was also in dispute with them on others. On the 18th December 1718, he along with James Kirkup, were fined by the Wardens for “Misbehaueing themselves and giving each other unbrotherly words”, and on the 3rd May 1721 he was fined again for “For unbrotherly words and giving a brother a lye”. He was also heavily fined on the 16th November 1721 for underhand dealings with John Hewitt; “to the great prejudice of this company”.
French must have resigned as Assaymaster sometime in 1712, for at the meeting on the 23rd September 1712, Thomas Hewitson was sworn in as Assaymaster. This must have been a very disappointing outcome for the Company as they had invested heavily in the training of French, the bill for the trip to London came to £14-5s-7d and French was also paid 43 shillings for his trouble, although the knowledge appears to have been passed on, for at a meeting on the 28th November 1717, Mark Grey Nicholson was appointed Assaymaster and was to be instructed in the art by Jonathan French, so presumably Hewitson was taught by French as well.

Jonathan French died in early 1733, while in office as Warden to the Company of Goldsmiths of Newcastle.

Below is a list of the known apprentices of Jonathan French.

John French. Son of Joshua French, late of Leamington. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 8th May 1717. He continued with Jonathan French as a journeyman.

William Whitfield. Son of John Whitfield. Term of Indenture: Seven Years as from 12th September 1713. William Whitfield was indentured to John Younghusband, but following the death of his master, elected to serve the rest of his term with Jonathan French, as from 18th December 1718.

George Hymers. Son of George Hymers of Newcastle. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 30th August 1721.

Edward French. Son of William French of Newburn. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 18th April 1727. Upon the death of Jonathan French, he was turned over to Isaac Cookson, as from 13th February 1733.


Trev.
.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41069
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Postby dognose » Mon Feb 02, 2009 1:03 pm

John Carnaby of Newcastle

John Carnaby, the son of William Carnaby of Newcastle, was a former apprentice and later journeyman of Francis Batty II. He appears to have left the service of Batty around 1718 to set up business on his own account and became Warden of the Company of Goldsmiths of Newcastle for the first time in 1721, along side his former master Francis Batty.

Carnaby also appears to be the maker of the punches used at the Newcastle Assay Office, for in the minutes of the Company's meeting in May 1721, recorded in the disbursements column, a note 'To John Carnaby for two stamps & 3 letters of Essay--6s-2d'. It was also noted at the same meeting that the letter 'a' would be used for 1721, so maybe it was Carnaby that was responsible for the reversed lion, known to have been used from that date.

Batty and Carnaby were reunited to serve as Wardens again for the year 1727. This must have been a busy year for Carnaby as the year before he had taken over an Inn. The Inn-keeping business is confirmed in the minutes of the Company's meeting on 3rd May 1727 'To Mr Carnabys bill for dynner on Head Meeting Day--£2-0s-0d' and at the following years meeting on 6th May 1728 'To Mr Carnaby for last years entirtainmt £2-0s-0d' and also 'To Mr Carnabys note for charcole £1-0s-0d'.

The fare must have good at Carnaby's Inn, for the following year the Company returned there for the 1728 meeting, a note in the minutes of the 5th May 1729 records 'To Mr Carnaby for last years entertaiment £2-15s-0d.
The year 1729 saw Carnaby as Warden again, this time with Robert Makepeace. He was also in attendence at the meeting on 4th May 1730, this appears to leave no doubt that his silversmithing career continued as well as that of an Inn-keeper.

The Company again asked John Carnaby to make the punches for the Assay Office as a note in the minutes of 3rd May 1731 confirms 'Paid Mr Carnaby for severall sets of stamps £1-3s-0d'.
Margaret Gill in her excellent work on Newcastle silver has Carnaby dying in 1733, but he appears to have survived a little longer, for at the meeting on 5th May 1735, the minutes record 'To Mr Carnaby for last years entertainment £3-0s-0d'. This is the last mention of John Carnaby, but it would appear that his silversmithing business was carried on by his widow, as the following reference in the minutes of the meeting held on 3rd May 1738; 'Paid Mrs Carnaby & C when Wm. Carre Esq. was made free £1-16s-0d' this is the only reference I could find that John Carnaby may have had an apprentice. There is just one last note of the name of Carnaby, noted at the meeting of 4th May 1747 in the disbursements column 'Lost by Mrs Carnaby 9s' what that is an indication of, I'll doubt we'll ever know.

Journeymen of John Carnaby
Robert Abercromby Known to have been working May 1720

Trev.
.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41069
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Postby dognose » Thu Feb 19, 2009 6:06 pm

Robert Makepeace of Newcastle

Robert Makepeace was another of Francis Batty II's apprentices, the son of Thomas Makepeace of Newcastle, he was indentured to Batty for a term of seven years as from the 2nd February 1707. Following the completion of his apprenticeship in 1714 he appears to have remained with Batty as a journeyman.

Robert Makepeace became Free on the 11th November 1718, and it was probably at this date that he entered into partnership with his former employer, but this would appear to have ended by early 1720.

At the Newcastle Company of Goldsmiths meeting on the 3rd May 1720, it was recorded that Robert Makepeace had taken his younger brother, Thomas, into apprenticeship as from 9th February 1719. I assume that this was a clerical error, and should have read 1720, for there would have been four meetings between those dates, and this important fact would have been recorded earlier. The same entry notes that Robert and Thomas's father was now deceased and Robert was to be paid a fee of twenty pounds for the indenture. The Company at this point fined Robert £5, for taking an apprentice before he had been Free three years, the usual fine, and to be expected. Fines such as this were a way of raising much needed revenue and were not seen as a 'rap over the knuckles'.

At the meeting on the 3rd May 1721, Robert Makepeace was elected to serve as Warden alongside James Kirkup for the coming year, this was a position he was to serve on several occasions during his career.

The minutes of the meeting held on the 2nd February 1730 reveal the story of two wayward apprentices. Luke Killingworth Potts, an apprentice of Robert Makepeace and Robert Ainsley, an apprentice of George Bulman were found to have been stealing from their Masters. Makepeace and Bulman were described in the minutes as " having sustained great loss and damage". Potts and Ainsley were both discharged from their positions and the minutes state that neither of them would ever be entitled or admitted to his Freedom of the Company.
At the same meeting, William Dalton, a Brother of the Company, was fined for buying gold rings from Potts, without acquainting Makepeace of the same, and was ordered to pay £3 to the Company and ordered to return the said rings or there value to Makepeace. In furture any goldsmith who purchased gold or silver, old or new, from any Brother's apprentice without immediately acquainting the said apprentice's Master, would be fined £10 by the Company for each offence and the goods forfeited.

The minutes of the meeting held on the 3rd May 1745, show the entry into the Company of Robert and Thomas, the sons of Robert Makepeace. There appears to be no record of their apprenticeships, but perhaps this entry is indicative of a active role in their fathers business.

Robert Makepeace died in 1755.

Below is a list of the known apprentices of Robert Makepeace.

Thomas Makepeace. Son of Thomas Makepeace of Newcastle. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 9th February 1720(?). The younger brother of Robert Makepeace.

Luke Killingworth Potts. Son of Luke Potts. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 25th March 1728. Discharged for theft.

William Wilkinson. Son of William Wilkinson. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 1st January 1732. Upon completion of his apprenticeship he set up business in Sunderland.

Thomas Blackett. Son of Thomas Blackett of Sedgefield. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 25th June 1732. He was later to become Foreman at John Langlands.
He is described by Thomas Bewick in his Memoir as 'This man, who was one of my Godfathers, had been foreman to the late John Langlands where he was much noticed as a man of most intrepid spirit and rendered remarkable for his honour, honesty and punctuality'.

Below is a list of the known journeymen of Robert Makepeace.

William Campbell. Known to have been working November 1726

Thomas Makepeace. Known to have been working May 1727

Trev.
.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41069
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Postby dognose » Thu Apr 09, 2009 5:56 am

The Known Apprentices of John Hampston & John Prince of York 1770-1796

Thomas Hornby Son of George Hornby, Carpenter. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 26th February 1771. Free 1778. Noted as Jeweller of Spurriergate, York, 1784. Died January 1792.

William Tiler Son of Chamberlain Tiler of York, silversmith. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 2nd February 1778.

William Topham Son of Benjamin Topham of Thirsk, tailor. Term of Indenture: Eight years as from 2nd October 1778. Married Mary Ann Day. Died September 1797.

Robert Jones Son of Josiah Jones of Hull, goldsmith. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 22nd January 1782. Married Ann Breary.

Samuel Levy Son of Henry Levy, glass cutter. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 19th May 1785. Free 1792.

Richard Surr Son of John Surr of York, china & glassman. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 13th April 1787. Free 1794.

Trev.
.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41069
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Postby dognose » Fri Apr 10, 2009 2:06 pm

The Known Apprentices of Hampston, Prince & Cattles of York 1796-1804

Richard Watson Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 17th May 1796.

Samuel Pierce Son of Thomas Pierce of Holywell, Flint, Wales, butcher. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 1st July 1796.

Thomas Stead Son of Michael Stead of York, horse dealer. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 1st October 1796. Became Assay Master at York c.1837-1839. Died 2nd May 1839 aged 59.

Edward Jackson Son of John Jackson of York, tailor. Term of Indenture: Eight years as from 11th March 1799. Free 1807. Died 5th October 1859 aged 73.

John Whip Son of William Whip, coal merchant. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 4th October 1799. Free 1820.
See: viewtopic.php?t=15994

James Barber Son of John Barber, cabinet maker & toyman. Born 4th October 1784. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 21st March 1800. Married Margaret Clark. Became Prime Warden of the Goldsmiths Company of York 1851. Died 10th March 1857 aged 73.

William Ferrand Son of William Ferrand of York, plane-maker. Term of Indenture: Eight years as from 18th April 1800.

Luke Creaser Son of William Creaser of York, farmer. Term of Indenture: Eight years as from 17th December 1800. Married Catherine Potter 1808. Free 1809.

Joshua Potts Son of John Potts of Howden, watchmaker. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 7th December 1802. Free 1810. Married Hannah Atlay. Committed suicide by arsenic poisoning on the 9th April 1854 aged 67.

John Duce Son of John Duce of York, shoemaker. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 25th April 1803.

Trev.
.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41069
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Postby dognose » Wed Apr 15, 2009 4:59 pm

The Known Apprentices of Prince & Cattles of York 1804-1807

Benjamin Harrison Son of John Harrison the engraver at Hampston, Prince & Cattles. Term of Indenture: Eight years as from 23rd January 1805. Benjamin Harrison was to stay with the company for nearly thirty years, from apprentice to foreman. He died in 1836.

John Burrill Son of Thomas Burrill, Butcher of York. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 10th September 1806. Free 1814. Assay Master at York 1839-c.1857. He died on the 14th April 1864, aged 73.
John Burrill was the subject of a damming report following a visit from the Wardens of the London Goldsmiths Company on 11th October 1851 as shown below.

The Goldsmiths Company of York consists of two persons, viz., James Barber, a manufacturing silversmith, who likewise makes wedding rings, and keeps the principal silversmiths and jewellers shop in York. He is Warden of the Company, and a magistrate of the city of York. John Bell, who keeps a retail silversmiths shop, is a manufacturer of wedding rings and a small worker in silver. John Burrill is the Assay Master, and John (Sic. Should be Stephen) Baker, a chemist, is the Clerk. John Burrill, the Assay Master was a worn-out spoonmaker in the employ of Mr Barber, the Warden, and evidently is, and always was, quite unfit for the employment of an assayer, being ignorant of the business, to which he was appointed 13 years since; he is paid £7 a year by Mr Barber, and £3 a year by Mr Bell, and keeps a small public house, which is also the nominal assay office. He has the charge of the punches, and marks what is sent to him by Mr Barber and Mr Bell, but he has no apparatus for assaying, nor even any pretensions to making assays. As he makes no assays, of course he keeps no diet, nor any check of what he marks, as bound by law. He asserted, that after making the necessary drawings and scrapings, the same were sent, either by himself, Mr Barber, or Mr Bell, to London, to Messrs. Johnson, in Hatton Garden, to be assayed, and if found correct, the articles were duly marked; but this assertion, made to Mr Johnson himself, having been shown to be false, he at length confessed his custom was to rely on the correctness of the two Wardens, who were the only manufacturers, and who had the silver from London, from Messers. Collins & Furber, which silver came with an assay, showing it to be standard; it was then manufactured so long as it lasted, and no assay was made, and that he marked it on the word of the manufacturer that it was correct.
That with regard to wedding rings, he was assured they were made from sovereigns; he therefore marked them as of 22 carat gold, without any assay.


The report appeared to do John Burrill little harm, as he remained the Assay Master at York for another six years.

Trev.
.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41069
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Postby dognose » Fri Apr 17, 2009 4:45 pm

The Known Apprentices of Cattle & Barber of York 1808-1813

John Harrison Son of John Harrison the engraver at Hampston, Prince & Cattles. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 5th November 1808. Free 1818. Another member of the Harrison family who were so closely linked with this firm. Like his brother Benjamin, John was also a foreman with twenty-five years service to the company.

David Smith Son of Charles Smith, cordwainer. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 5th November 1808. Free 1818. He joined the company on the same day as John Harrison and they both appear to have obtained their Freedom in the same year. He appears to have go into business on his own account, following the granting of his Freedom, but was found dead on the 17th June 1840, he had committed suicide by the cutting of his own throat, aged 45 years.

Robert Ellison Son of Robert Ellison of York, innkeeper. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 3rd June 1809. Free 1820. He married Ann Lupton on Christmas Eve 1819.

George Johnson Son of Joseph Johnson, saddler. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 1st January 1810. Free 1818.

Trev.
.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41069
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Postby dognose » Thu Apr 23, 2009 4:06 pm

The Known Apprentices of Barber & Whitwell of York 1814-1823

George Hall Son of John Hall of York. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 4th October 1817.

John Rylah/Rylake? Son of George Rylah of York. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 28th February 1818.

William Blackstone Son of George Blackstone. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 28th February 1818. Became a working jeweller at Whitby by 1830, and still recorded there in directories of 1872, at 44 Crag Street.

Robert Thomas Son of William Thomas of York. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 21st August 1819. Free by 1830.

William Darling Son of William Darling of York, shoemaker. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 18th September 1820. Born 29th September 1806. Free 1829. Noted as Watchmaker & Jeweller of 42, Coney Street, in York directories of 1851. Died 6th July 1888, aged 82.

William Giles Son of John Giles of Clifton. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 18th September 1820. Free by 1830. Became a Jeweller at Regent's Park, London.

William Briskham Son of John Briskham of York, ostler. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 19th May 1821.

Henry Baines Son of John Baines of York. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 6th October 1821.

Trev.
.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41069
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Postby dognose » Sun Apr 26, 2009 8:23 am

The Known Apprentices of Roberts, Cadman & Co. of Sheffield

Samuel Roberts Jnr. and George Cadman entered their mark at the Sheffield Assay Office in June 1786.


Benjamin Smith known to have been an apprentice 1787.

John Kirkby known to have been an apprentice 1787.

George Frost known to have completed his apprenticeship in 1794.

Image
Roberts & Cadman - OSP mark

Trev.

http://www.925-1000.com/silverplate_R.html
http://www.925-1000.com/silverplate__OSP4.html
.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41069
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Postby dognose » Thu Apr 30, 2009 5:52 am

The Known Apprentices of Barber, Cattle & North of York 1824-1835

John Cowlman Son of Richard Cowlman of York. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 5th March 1825.

Thomas Housman/Horsman Son of Thomas Housman of York. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 22nd May 1830. Free by 1839.

Robert Heselgrave Son of Robert Heselgrave of Chapel Allerton. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 22nd May 1830. Robert Heselgrave worked for the company for 29 years. In 1859, along with another former employee, Robert Walker, he purchased the business of Barber & Co. This partnership was to last but a few months, for by the end of 1859 Heselgrave was working on his own. He died on the 17th February 1885 from cirrhosis of the liver, aged 68. His widow, Margaret, continued with the business until her death on the 21st March 1890, aged 72.

Thomas Quick Aitken Son of William Aitken of York, bookbinder. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 22nd September 1832. Free by 1841.

Matthew John Blythe Son of John Blythe of Redeness Street, York. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 29th July 1835. Free by 1847.

Trev.
http://www.925-1000.com/dlYork.html
.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41069
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Postby dognose » Tue May 05, 2009 5:59 am

The Known Apprentices of Barber & North of York 1835-1847

John Harrison Son of William Harrison, confectioner. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 16th July 1836. Stayed with the company until he went into business on his own account in 1859.

William Hopton Son of George Hopton, corset maker. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 4th February 1837.

Edward Cloak Son of James Cloak, carver, gilder and looking glass manufacturer. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 4th February 1837. Free by 1846. Died 23rd September 1865, aged 43.

Joseph Wadkin Son of John Wadkin, porter. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 5th November 1839.

Edward John Dale Son of John Dale of York, grocer. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 18th November 1839.

John Heap/Hesp Son of John Hesp of York, joiner. Term of Indenture: Seven years as from 9th June 1840.

Trev.
http://www.925-1000.com/dlYork.html
.


Return to “Contributors' Notes”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests