The Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

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Re: The Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Mar 22, 2020 6:24 am

DEMAND FOR SILVER IN EXCESS OF SUPPLY

New York


Silver and silver plate manufacturers have been so pressed with business during the last few months that several of the larger concerns have been forced to refuse orders, or to accept them only with the understanding that deliveries would not be made before two or three months. An added stimulus has been given their business through the unusual demand that has come from retailers and dealers for silverware for June weddings. One big silversmith declared yesterday that the outlook for June business is excellent, and that orders already received for silverware for delivery prior to that month are greatly in excess of those of other years.

Retailers are particularly anxious to obtain the better grade articles. Manufacturers are receiving large orders for plated ware, but because of the accumulation of orders since the first of the year they have been unable to keep up with the demand. Plated ware, knives and forks, etc., are in particular demand, one company reporting that in one pattern alone they are 3,000 behind orders. Labor is gradually showing improvement, and the manufacturers expect that conditions shortly will assume a more normal aspect. With the price of silver still high and supplies small, the silversmiths say that it is not possible for them to make any reductions to the trade at this time.


Source: The New York Tribune - 7th May 1920

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Re: The Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Mar 23, 2020 7:52 am

SILVER-MOUNTED SKULLS?

Paris


France has heard of Victoria's visit to Waterloo — heard it with indignant scorn. The jackal that digs the dead from their graves, yet spares their bones — not so, that worse than jackal, England. Will it be believed—yes, it will be; for — when England is the subject, Frenchmen will believe any thing; will it be believed that the same chaise de poste which conveyed Victoria back to Brussels, also conveyed the skulls of twelve French grenadiers, dug from the field of Waterloo? And for what purpose — infuriated Frenchmen will ask — was this sacrilege committed? We will tell them; and when they have heard it, let their swords glisten in the sun! These twelve French skulls have been sent to the Court silversmith in London, to be mounted into drinking cups; and, when mounted, to be presented to the Duke of Wellington for the accursed orgies held at Apsley House, on the 18th of June.

Source: Le National - November 1843

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Re: The Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Mar 27, 2020 5:54 am

MEDLOCK & CRAIG

Inverness


Medlock & Craig Ltd, of 29 Queensgate, Inverness, changed hands last month when Mr and Mrs R W Allan retired after being there since 1947.

Established in 1876, the shop has maintained traditions of the Scottish trade which will be kept up by the new owners, Forth Jewellers, of Rose Street, Edinburgh.

Mr Allan, in the trade since 1936, is looking forward to a lot of golf and fishing.


Source: British Jeweller and Watch Buyer - March 1979

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Re: The Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Apr 02, 2020 5:59 am

SIR ARTHUR COCKS

Sydney


The many friends of Sir Arthur Cocks were delighted when the announcement was made that the King had honoured him with a Knighthood in the Order of the British Empire. Sir Arthur has played a prominent part in the public life of Sydney and of the State. He was only 18 years of age when he entered the house of a Melbourne wholesale optician, and it was not long before Sir Arthur Cocks came to Sydney. To-day he is the managing director of Arthur Cocks & Co., Ltd., wholesale opticians. His success is a fine tribute to his ability. For eight years Sir Arthur Cocks was an alderman of the City Council, and at one time held the highest civic office—that of Lord Mayor. Since 1910 he has been a representative in the larger sphere of the State Parliament, and as Treasurer has won the confidence of his Cabinet colleagues. Jewellers join in congratulating Sir Arthur Cocks and Lady Cocks on the honour conferred upon them.

Source: The Commonwealth Jeweller & Watchmaker - July 1923

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Re: The Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Apr 07, 2020 12:44 pm

LIGHTNING CAUSES HAVOC IN JEWELER'S HOUSE AND STORE

Norristown, Pennsylvania


Norristown, Pa., July 26.—The thunder storm on Thursday was very severe and played some curious pranks in and about North Wales. At the residence of jeweler D. H. Krause, on Main St., a ball of fire seemed to run into the house over the electric light wire, burning out the fuse box and tearing off a piece of moulding. Balls of fire raced around a table in the room where Mrs. Krause was sitting and it seemed as though the entire house was ablaze. The electric lights in Mr. Krause's store were extinguished by the shock. A portion of the cornice was also torn off on the outside of the building where the electric wires enter. The experience was one which Mr. and Mrs. Krause do not care to again pass through.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 3rd August 1898

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Re: The Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Apr 10, 2020 4:34 am

HEAVY FAILURE OF SILVERSMITHS

London


At the London Bankruptcy Court, yesterday, the failure was announced of Messrs. Henry Draper and Thomas Stewart, of 58, New Bond Street, jewellers and silversmiths, trading as John Turner & Co. The liabilities are estimated at £40,000; assets, £14,000.

Source: Sheffield and Rotherham Independent - 15th August 1879

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Re: The Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Apr 20, 2020 12:50 pm

IMPORTANT AMALGAMATION

Birmingham


The Amalgamation of the old established house of John Gilbert & Co., Limited, and William Spurrier, Limited, has been bought about. Both firms are in good repute. The former are manufacturers of spoons, forks, etc., and the latter as manufacturers of tea and coffee sets, and kindred articles.

Source: The Jeweller and Metalworker - 1st September 1885

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Re: The Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon May 11, 2020 1:20 pm

A JUBILEE MEDAL

London


In continuation of their medallic series, the council of the Art Union of London are about to offer three premiums of £50, £30, and £20, for a pair of dies for a medal to celebrate the jubilee of Her Majesty. The medals will be three inches diameter, and, in bronze and silver, will form a portion of the prizes to be given in their next distribution. The competition is confined to British artists.

Source: The Jeweller and Metalworker - 15th December 1886

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Re: The Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed May 13, 2020 7:30 am

KENNETH L. HEWES

Plainville, Massachusetts


With deep regret, 'The News" announces the death on August 13 of Kenneth L. Hewes, son of Mr. and Mrs. William K. Hewes of Plainville. The funeral was held Sunday, August 15 under the auspices of the American Legion, John Edward McNeil Post, No. 217.

"'Ken," as he was known to everyone in the shop, came to work with Whiting & Davis in May, 1919. He was in the Shipping Department until September when he was transferred to the Bench Department, where he worked until he was taken fatally sick. Before coming here, he was in the service, being stationed at Camp Devens.

Ken Hewes was one of the best liked men in the shop and highly esteemed by the community. He took an active interest in shop affairs and was historian and war risk officer of the Plainville Post of the American Legion. In him. Whiting & Davis has lost an employee of whom they were justly proud.


Source: The Wadco News - 27th August 1920

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Re: The Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon May 18, 2020 4:45 am

ANDREW & Co.

London


To celebrate Mr. Charles A. Baker's 25 years' service with Andrew & Co. Ltd., of Hatton Garden, Dr. and Mrs. Andrew Guershoon Colin gave a cocktail reception and dinner. Presenting a cheque to Mr. Baker on behalf of the company, Dr. Colin referred to Mr. Baker's service in the First World War, his A.R.P. duties in Hatton Garden during the last war, and his reliability and unfailing loyalty to the company throughout a quarter of a century.

Source: Watchmaker, Jeweller & Silversmith - June 1957

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Re: The Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed May 27, 2020 4:11 am

THE KAISER S DOUBLE STEALS FROM JEWELLER

London


Before Mr. W. R. M'Connell, Q.C. (chairman), at the Newington Sessions on Wednesday, a man, named Harry Evans, 28, traveller, who has gained some notoriety as the "double" of the German Emperor, on account of his facial expression and upturned moustache, pleaded guilty to, and was sentenced to eleven months' hard labour for, having unlawfully, by false and fraudulent pretences, obtained sums of money, and stolen jewellery, the property of his master, Ernest Herbert, watchmaker and jeweller, of 25, New Kent-road. Mr. H. C. Biron prosecuted. Mr. W. M. Thompson represented the prisoner.

Detective-sergeant Smith, M Division, said that the prosecutor was now a bankrupt, with liabilities of about £5,000. The amount of goods actually stolen by the prisoner approached £5,000, and he had employed servants at 4s. a day to pledge gold and silver Watches, diamond rings, signets and seals, brooches, &c., in different parts of London.

A singular fact was brought to light by the defending counsel, who explained that Evans could neither read nor write. He had been employed at the Surrey Theatre, and occasionally had played small parts in various productions. It was urged on his behalf that he had given way to temptation.


Source: Evening Express - 14th September 1899

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Re: The Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Jun 02, 2020 5:00 am

THE ILLEGAL SALE OF JEWELLERY MADE WITH COINS

United Kingdom


Fined £10 - Khusall Khan was fined £10 at Tenby for using threepenny pieces other than as currency. Police constable Evans stated that while in plain clothes at St. Margaret's Fair, Tenby, he saw a brooch containing four silver threepenny pieces, dipped in gold, on defendant's stall. When asked the price Khan said, "Ten shillings." Khan denied offering the brooch for sale, and said that it had been given to him as a charm.

Source: Jeweller & Metalworker - 1st November 1945

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Re: The Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Jun 07, 2020 11:07 am

FICTITIOUS MARKS

London


A correspondent who has called the attention of the wardens of the Goldsmiths' Company to an advertisement offering albert chains for eighteenpence, 'every link marked 18c.,' has sent us the reply he received:- 'I sympathize entirely with you feeling in the matter, and much regret that the mere mark of the letters 18c. is not sufficient to bring the vendors legally within the scope of the Acts of Parliament which govern the proceedings of the Goldsmiths' Company.' Then surely it is high time the Acts were amended; for a yellow chain, marked on every link 18c., is of such obvious utility to a swindler that its manufacture ought to be prohibited by law. 'Adulteration,' Mr. Bright has indeed told us, 'is only another form of competition .' But to mark a brass chain with the stamp popularly supposed to certify a gold one goes beyond even adulteration, as it seems to honest folks.

Source: St. James's Gazette - October 1885

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Re: The Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Jun 08, 2020 1:42 pm

DEATH OF THOMAS R. MARSHALL

Edinburgh


Word comes from Scotland that Thomas R. Marshall, head of the well known firm of William Marshall & Co., jewelers and goldsmiths to the Queen, 134 Princess St., Edinburgh, died recently, aged 78 years, at his residence, 4 E. Castle Road, after a protracted illness. Mr. Marshall was identified with philanthropic and religious work in Edinburgh during the past half century.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 6th February 1901

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Re: The Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Jun 10, 2020 12:17 pm

DEATH OF CHARLES PARKER

Meriden, Connecticut


Charles Parker, president of the Charles Parker Co., Meriden, Conn., died at his home in that city Friday, January 31. He was a member of the First Methodist Episcopal Church, from which he was buried on the Sunday following his death. Mr. Parker was in his ninety-fourth year, and until recently was in unusually good health for one of his advanced age. He retained his mental faculties in good condition until just before his death.

Charles Parker was born in Cheshire, Conn., January 2, 1809, and as early as 1828 was manufacturing coffee mills in Meriden, going in business on his own account in 1829. Mr. Parker’s business ability was constantly progressing, having had a number of experiences during the intervening year, when in 1844 he supplanted the water power of his factory by steam power, and largely increased his facilities thereby. He was the first manufacturer of plated spoons and forks and plated hollow ware in Meriden.

The Charles Parker Co., or corporation, was formed in 1877 and other plants, such as Parker Bros., manufacturers of the Parker shotgun; the Meriden Curtain Fixture Co., and the Parker Clock Co., were all controlled in the Parker interests. The Charles Parker Co. also manufacture at East Meriden cabinet locks, tea, table and basting spoons, and at Yalesville coffee mills, piano stools and packing boxes. Mr. Parker has long been noted for his liberality in charitable affairs, and in those connected with church advancement, contributing largely toward the erection of the church from which he was buried, having given the congregation the lot on which the church was built. With the exception of the office of mayor of Meriden, to which he was elected when the city was incorporated, Mr. Parker steadily declined to accept office.

Mr. Parker was married October 6, 1831, and had ten children, the youngest son, Dexter Wright Parker, graduating from West Point in 1870. He and his sister, Mrs. William H. Lyon, are the only children who survive.

William H. Lyon, Mr. Parker’s son-in-law, for several years past has borne the responsibilities of the business, arising from so many industries, and has been remarkably successful in his management, which has been a very prosperous one.


Source: Hardware - 10th February 1902

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Re: The Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Jun 11, 2020 3:29 am

JEWELER IN A DUAL

Castle Rock, Washington


Castle Rock, Wash., Feb. 9.—Last Wednesday evening people were startled by the report of eight shots being fired in rapid succession. Upon investigation it was found that the shooting was done by J. B. Barnes and Harry Lovell, each with a 38-calibre revolver firing at the other at close range. Barnes fired five shots and Lovell three.

Lovell had been rooming at the Barnes home and Mr. Barnes thought he had reasons to believe that improper relations existed between Lovell and Mrs. Barnes. After the shooting Lovell was found in a lot. He had been shot in the left leg, the tibia being broken. His coat showed that four bullets had passed through it in various places, but there were no wounds of importance to his person except the one in the leg. Mrs. Barnes fell in the wagon track in the alley from a wound in the hip. Barnes escaped uninjured. The wounded were carried to their homes and medical aid was summoned.

J. B. Barnes is a jeweler of this place and is well and favorably known. Harry Lovell is comparatively a stranger here.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 20th February 1901

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Re: The Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Jun 13, 2020 1:35 pm

PETER L. KRIDER Co.

Philadelphia


Peter L. Krider Co., Philadelphia, Pa., have just completed an eight-inch prize cup, presented by Robert J. W. Koons, vice-commodore of the Corinthian Yacht Club, as a prize for 36-foot yachts, to be competed for Decoration Day, May 30. The trophy is a loving cup decorated with a large anchor with cables twined around the cup from which fly the Corinthian Yacht Club flag, the vice-commodore’s flag and his own private signal, in rich enamel.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 13th March 1901

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Re: The Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Jun 17, 2020 5:07 am

CUTLERY STUDY BEGINS

United Kingdom


The study of the cutlery industry has now been completed and was considered by a joint industry/Government working party which held its first meeting last month.

The working party include the following: Mr J Wadsworth, Chairman; Mr B J Viner, President, Cutlery and Silverware Association (CSA); Mr A J M Price, President, Federation of British Cutlery Manufacturers (FBCM); Mr R Brownhill, Nickel Blanks Co Ltd; Mr R G West, George Butler of Sheffield Ltd, President-elect, CSA; Mr H Flowers, Jessop & Smith Ltd; Mr J E Spiers, Walter Trickett & Co Ltd; Mr B H Bridge, General Secretary, National Union of Gold, Silver and Allied Trades; Mr E F Goowin, General and Municipal Workers' Union; Councillor C J C Betts, Sheffield City Council; Mr J E Sellers, Department of Industry; Miss J Robinson, Department of Industry; Mr E A Oldfield, Research Director - Cutlery and Allied Trades Research Association; Miss M Arnold, Minute Secretary.

Source: British Jeweller & Watch Buyer - March 1979

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Re: The Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Jun 19, 2020 5:30 am

DARING ROBBERY AT W.J. DINGLEY'S

Birmingham


There has recently been a large number of more or less serious cases of burglary and warehouse breaking in Birmingham and suburbs. One of the most serious took place on Friday night in Northampton-street, when the premises of Mr. W. J. Dingley, jeweller and medallist, were entered in a most daring manner. The thieves cut a hole in the roof and let themselves down into the room below. The most important part of the stock had fortunately been placed in the safe. A desperate attack was made upon this, but it was ineffectual. The thieves got away with gold and silver goods and a number of Masonic medals of the total value of about £250.

Source: Evening Express and Evening Mail - 8th April 1907

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Re: The Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Jul 04, 2020 7:12 am

THIEVES AVOID COBRA

London


A four-a-half-foot cobra spitting venom was employed to guard a huge sapphire worth £1.4m at the Sri Lankan Festival in London's Commonwealth Institute earlier this year. But thieves stole jewellery from the case next door.

Source: British Jeweller and Watch Buyer - December 1981

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