The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Sep 16, 2019 4:42 am

DEATH SEEKING PERPETUAL MOTION

Luverne, Minnesota


A. J. Lawrence, a jeweler by trade, of Luverne, Minn., died a few days ago from injuries sustained by falling from the Burlington trestle, near the Luverne mill. The deceased was engaged at the time of his death upon a new balance wheel for a watch by which he hoped to secure perpetual motion. He was born in 1847.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 15th August 1894

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Sep 17, 2019 2:57 am

BREACH OF PROMISE CASES IN THE JEWELLERY TRADE

Birmingham


Upwards of twelve breach of promise cases were entered for Birmingham Assizes now in progress. A jewellers' cashier has recovered £75 from a traveller who objected to marry her because she was in trade. Yesterday Eliza Tonks obtained £35 from a jeweller who had courted her fifteen years, and whom she had nursed through an illness.

Source: South Wales Daily News - 4th August 1888

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Sep 18, 2019 4:09 am

CONSERVING PLATINUM

United States


Having in mind the present needs of American industries, educational institutions and sciences for platinum, and the possible future requirements of the Government, the Jewelers' Vigilance Committee, has adopted resolutions, which declare:

“That we pledge ourselves to discontinue and strongly recommend to all manufacturing and retail jewelers of the United States that they in a truly patriotic spirit discourage the manufacture, sale, and use of platinum in all bulky and heavy pieces of jewelry.

“That during the period of the war, or until the present supplies of platinum shall be materially augmented, we pledge ourselves to discontinue, and recommend that the jewelry trade discourage the use of all nonessential platinum findings or parts of jewelry, such as scarf-pin stems, pin tongues, joints, catches, swivels, spring rings, ear backs, etc., where gold would satisfactorily serve.

"That the jewelry trade encourage by all means in their power the use of gold in combination with platinum wherever proper artistic results may be obtained."

In commenting on these resolutions, Secretary Westfield said:

“This is wise, patriotic, and unselfish action for which the merchants and manufacturers are highly to he commended. It will take time to work out fully its beneficial effects to the country. It will disarm adverse criticism of the jewelry trade in this respect and lead to general cooperation with them. Such is the earnest desire of the department. The jewelry business is a part and an important part of our commerce. It has acted fairly, its normal needs should be considered fairly.

"Platinum is required for many uses. Every such use has its just claim. None may urge an exclusive demand. All have a part in our common country and the Government of that country seeks through the Department of Commerce to secure for all a due and proper share. To this end the considerate course taken by the jewelers will directly contribute."


Source: The Waste Trade Journal - 22nd May 1917

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Sep 19, 2019 4:52 am

FERDINAND AND FREDERICK FOX

New York


Ferdinand and Frederick Fox, silversmiths in this city, were arrested yesterday at the Hoboken ferry for Interfering with Police Officer Aldoretta and causing a disturbance at the new turnstiles at said ferry. They were held in $300 each by recorder Bohnstedt to answer.

Source: The New York Herald - 9th December 1876

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Sep 20, 2019 6:38 am

WILLIAM R. ELFERS

New York


Plates of unworked silver worth $8,000 were stolen from William R. Elfer's silver manufacturing establishment in New York. Thieves succeeded
in carrying away their loot in a wagon without leaving any clues. From the building next door, through which they entered the silversmith's establishment, the robbers took $500 worth of diamond glass cutters belonging to Tassi Bros., mirror manufacturers.


Source: Wauwatosa News - 4th November 1905

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Sep 21, 2019 5:54 am

FRENCH HALL-MARKING PROPOSALS

England


The French proposals in regard to Hall-Marking are equally interesting to the Sheffield silversmiths as to the jewelry trade of Birmingham, and for the purpose of considering them a special meeting of the committee of the Sheffield Chamber of Commerce was held on June 1st, the president, Mr. A. J. Hobson, presiding over an influential attendance. A lengthy letter was drafted to be sent to the Board of Trade strongly opposing the concession asked for by France, and it was decided to exert the strongest influence with the Sheffield members of Parliament. The letter goes somewhat over the same ground as the Birmingham communications already referred to. It is pointed out that while English silver sent into France has to be assayed and stamped with the French Hall-Mark before being offered for sale in France, and in addition is subject to customs duties, French silver coming to England is subject to no duty. Nearly all French silver is of the lowest standard, and the effect of the concession would be either to drive English silver out of the market or to necessitate the lowering of the English standard, and if the concession were made to one nation similar concessions would no doubt be asked for by other nations, and in some instances, notably the United States of America and Germany, there are no government regulations as to the quality of silver. It is pointed out also that the French Hall-Mark is the only one put on English silver by the French government, although the English article contains 925 points to the thousand, or nearly equivalent to the French highest standard of 950 points. Thus the high-class English article receives only the second quality Hall-Mark. "The British Lion on silver goods is the most valuable trade-mark in existence in the world, and its value would be destroyed if silver goods from various countries and of varying degrees of fineness were to be imported freely without any British Hall-Marks upon them."

On the same day a special meeting was held in London, presided over by Mr. Henry Pearson, and representing the silverplate trade of London, Birmingham and Sheffield. A strong resolution was passed pointing out the injustice done to the English silver trade, entailing, as it does, the practical abolition of the English Hall-Mark. It was decided to ask for a deputation to wait on the president of the Board of Trade, and it was explained that steps have already been taken to guard against any immediate action being taken to admit French goods under the conditions asked for.

The matter has also been before the Coventry Chamber of Commerce and a resolution was carried declaring that the maintenance of the integrity of the British Hall-Mark is of such vital importance to the welfare of the industries of the district no arrangement for the recognition of foreign Hall-Marks should be made without the knowledge of and consultation with the members of the jewelers, silversmiths, and watchmakers' trades in London, Birmingham, Sheffield and Coventry. At this meeting there was a strong complaint that the affixing of the English Hall-Mark to foreign goods enabled such goods to be sold so as to lead to the impression that they were English made.


Source: The Metal Industry - September 1908

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Sep 22, 2019 7:36 am

JEWELER SHOOTS INTRUDER

Waynesburg, Pennsylvania


Waynesburgh, Pa., Aug. 26.—Considerable excitement has been created here, occasioned by the killing of a young man named Porter Huffman by W. S. Pipes, the jeweler, on Saturday night.

From the facts gathered in the case, it is learned that Mr. Pipes had been annoyed for some time by parties prowling around his residence and outbuildings at unseemly hours of the night and stealing his chickens and pilfering things out of the stable. On this occasion it appears he had gone home, and was about to retire for the night, when his wife called his attention to the fact that there was someone in the stable. He therefore seized his revolver, and going out the alley back of his house, he was met by a party, as he supposed, coming out of his stable.

Mr. Pipes told him to bolt, but instead of doing so he turned and attacked the jeweler with a butcher knife. The latter, believing his life was in danger, opened fire, one shot taking effect and causing almost instant death. Mr. Pipes sustained several knife wounds, though not of a serious nature. Directly after the shooting the jeweler went up in town and made known what had happened, had a physician called, then gave himself up to the authorities.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 2nd September 1891

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Sep 23, 2019 3:45 am

GERMAN JEWELRY TRADE HIT

Germany


The jewelry trade, says an article in Industrie and Handels Zeitung of Berlin, is one of the first to suffer during any economic crisis. The business
flourished during the inflation which swept over Germany in the winter of 1919-20. Now, however, due to the stabilizing of exchange and a general stagnation of business, the jewelry trade is practically dead. The article further states that Germany, having been shut out from the world markets for some six years, has seen its place in the jewelry export trade taken by the manufacturers of Birmingham, Paris, Switzerland and the United States. Spain and South America, once good markets for German jewelry, are lost for the present, and in Germany itself, of course, because of present conditions, few people are buying jewelry.

High prices which prevail here and the uncertainty of delivery have also discouraged foreign buyers. With a hope of improving their condition, a
number of large German jewelry firms are beginning to send their salesmen to South America and Spain in an endeavor to reopen old relations.

In Pforzheim, the center of the German jewelry industry, 35,000 out of 70,00 inhabitants are employed in the precious metal industry. In pre-war times Pforzheim factories had an output of 200.000,000 marks' worth of jewelry a year. During 1919 and the early months of 1920, when inflation was at its height, Pforzheim was selling jewelry at a rate of about two billion marks per year; this enormous increase being accounted for not so much by increased turnover as by depreciation of the mark. In normal times three-fourths of the jewelry manufactured in the southwest German cities was produced for export.


Source: The Arizona Republican - 10th November 1920

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Sep 24, 2019 3:28 am

JEWELLERY TRADE BID BY BRITAIN

United Kingdom


Back home from the jungles of the Belgian Congo, the Pacific-washed shores of the Philippines, the bazaars of Persia and other far-away places are the BETRO "explorers" who have been surveying virtually unknown markets for the Jewellery and Silverware Council of Britain, writes our London correspondent.

This unprecedented attempt to put British jewellery and silverware on shopping lists from Bangkok to Brazzaville has provided British manufacturers and craftsmen with up to-the-minute information on the tastes and preferences of such potential customers as Siamese actressses, Chinese merchants and wealthy Egyptian landowners.

The "explorers*' discovered for instance, that Persians prefer 18 ct. red gold to all other metals; fine British jewellery is the first choice of wealthy Chinese in Hong Kong; the men of the Belgian Congo are ready purchasers of gold rings; and the wearing of costume jewellery in Siam is almost entirely limited to members of the acting profession.


Source: The Morning Bulletin - 26th August 1950

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Sep 25, 2019 4:00 am

BLACK MARKET OPERATIONS IN JEWELLERY

London


Investigations are being made into the London trade in second-hand jewellery.

A special report from one of the chiefs of the National Jewellers' Association reveals that only a small proportion of the jewels sold by private individuals ever reaches legitimate retailers.

Many of the mushroom shops which buy second-hand jewellery are suspect. Others, of course, are perfectly well conducted.

The newly-opened shops are forbidden by Board of Trade regulations to sell the jewellery retail. " Hundreds of these shops are springing up," an official of the National Jewellers' Association said.

"They buy up tens of thousands of pounds' worth of jewellery, while the established retail jeweller has little or nothing to sell since labour and materials are restricted to a bare minimum.

" No gold jewellery of more than nine carats is being manufactured, and the use of platinum for jewellery is entirely forbidden."

There is no suggestion that these new shops do not offer a fair price for the jewellery they buy. What the trade wants to know is where do the gold, silver, gems, and watches go, since the buyers are not allowed to sell retail and manufacturers say that they are not getting them.

Any morning, if you stroll along Hatton Garden, home of the diamond merchant and manufacturing jeweller you will see foreign-looking men standing about and talking earnestly with evidently respectable citizens. You may, if you watch, see a parcel, a ring, or a brooch change hands.

All very open and above board, no doubt. But the ordinary shopkeeper is asking how it is that these people always appear to have half a dozen watches, rings, or brooches to sell when manufacturers' stocks are practically non-existent, and cannot be replenished from the slender quota the Government allow for the making of jewellery.


Source: The Evening Star - 24th November 1944

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Sep 26, 2019 2:58 am

THE PLATE LICENCE QUESTION

Sheffield


The Sheffield Chamber of Commerce, some time since, passed a resolution in favour of the total abolition of the licence for the sale by retail of gold and silver plate. As this was done without opposition and as the seconder of the motion was a member of one of the largest firms of silver and electro-plate manufacturers in the world, the jewellers and plate dealers throughout the country naturally inferred that the resolution reflected the views of the silver and electro-plate manufacturers of the city. To say that the action caused surprise is to put the feeling evoked too mildly. At this time the retail jewellers were engaged in the task of establishing an Association, the primary object of which was to exert influence upon Parliament in favour of the retention of the licence, and it can be easily imagined that some of the leaders of the opposition were indignant with the manufacturers of Sheffield for their supposed hostility to the movement. It was felt, and rightly so, that the interests of the manufacturers of and dealers in these goods are so identical that the two sections ought to be united. Indeed, unity was declared absolutely necessary if the new Association was to succeed in its object. 'The Jeweller and Metalworker' then set to work to show that scarcely a single firm engaged in the silver and plate industry was anxious for the abolition of the licence, but on the contrary that they desired its retention and even an increase in the cost. That journal published letters from thirty different Sheffield firms to that effect. Now there is a probability that the Chamber of Commerce will rescind the objectionable resolution. In the annual report of that body there appears the following paragraph :—

At the instance of the Worcester Chamber of Commerce the Council considered whether, having regard to the existing depression in silver, the licences at present required from retail dealers for the sale of plate should not be abolished, and eventually they came to a resolution that the time had now arrived for the abolition of these licences, and stated their opinion that such a removal would assist the trade in silver articles. The resolution of the Council has led to a considerable amount of notice in the public press, and many members of the Chamber, engaged in the silver and electro-plate trade, having expressed their doubts as to the wisdom of the Council's resolution. The Council, however, call attention the fact that the resolution was proposed by a manufacturer largely interested in this particular trade, and desire to express their opinion that it is a matter which more closely concerns the trade itself than the general public, but the Council invite expressions of opinion from the members at the annual meeting with regard to the matter.

At the meeting of the Council, on Thursday in last week, Mr. Belk (Roberts & Belk), and Mr. J. E. Bingham (Walker & Hall), expressed, on behalf of the silver and allied trades, their opinion that the resolution had been adopted without full consideration, and that those interested in the question were not favourable to it, and it was understood that the Council would deal with the matter at their next meeting. It would thus seem that the opposition to the abolition of the licence is too strong among those principally interested to expect that it will succeed, and since it would mean a loss to the revenue no support could be expected from the Government.


Source: The Journal of Domestic Appliances and Sewing Machine Gazette - 1st March 1895

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Sep 27, 2019 3:50 am

ATTEMPT TO IMPROVE DESIGNS

London


The Autumn session of the London County Council Central School of Arts and Crafts, has just begun, and if its achievement be only as good as its promise, it should prove a valuable factor in that capture of German trade of which one hears so much at present. A special feature of the School's teaching, is to be made of the technical instruction of boys in silversmith and jewelry work, in which the art of design is to receive particular attention. It is not generally known that practically the whole of the jewelery trade is today in the hands of the Germans; the amount produced at home being, for all practical purposes, negligible.

Source: American Art News - 17th October 1914

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Sep 28, 2019 5:34 am

JEWELER SOLVES CHEWING PROBLEM WHILST IN JAIL

Columbus, Ohio


Makes Metal Teeth to Chew Jail Fare

Columbus O. "Iron Teeth John" is the name J. W. Rheam, an inmate of the penitentiary serving three years from Perry county for horse stealing, has earned front his fellow prisoners.

Rheam is an old man and at one time worked at the jewelery trade at Somerset. He has but two good teeth In his head and found the prison fare
rather hard to masticate. With an old file and a piece of soft iron Rheam supplied the deficiency, making a plate to fit over his two regaining molars. John can chew now for he has a set of "store teeth" that he will match with those turned out by any expert dentist.


Source: The Bee - 20th April 1907

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Sep 29, 2019 4:03 am

THE QUEEN'S WEDDING RING

London


Among the many interesting reminiscences of the Queen's early life elicited by the Jubilee is the fact that the man who made her Majesty's wedding ring is still living. He is a German by birth, and is now residing in Philadelphia, where he still plies his trade, working for many of the large jewellery firms of that city. After leaving Germany, where he learned his trade, he came to London to work; and when the order was given for the ring this German artisan was entrusted with the job.

Source: The Journal - 5th March 1898

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Sep 30, 2019 4:45 am

DISTURBANCE IN THE SILVER TRADE

Sheffield


There is a rumor from Sheffield of a serious dispute taking place in the silver trade. The men employed in the manufactories in the production of sterling silver goods have made demands that are equivalent to an advance of 25 per cent. Manufacturers labor under the present disadvantage of the fluctuating value of silver, and if to this must be added this advance upon the working cost the manufacturers will be in a grave position. One manufacturer is reported as saying that up to the present time he has steadily set his face against the use of German-made material for plating his goods, by the use of which his neighbors are able to undersell him; but this undermining of his trade and the constantly increasing demands of his workmen will compel him to follow the example of his competitors and seek to retain what is left to him of his home trade and his business in foreign markets by the use of these inferior materials.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 3rd November 1897

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Oct 01, 2019 4:46 am

MARY A. MILLS - MILLS & COLEMAN

New York


Mrs. Mary A. Mills, eighty years old, died yesterday morning at her home, No. 25 East Sixty-first-st. About three years ago Mrs. Mills had a bad fall from a Madison-ave. car, and a year ago received Injuries on another car, resulting In complications which caused her death. She was the head of the firm of Mills & Coleman, jewellery, at Madison-ave. and Sixty-first-st. She had been forty years In the diamond business, and was one of the best diamond experts In this city.

Mrs. Mills was twice married, the first time to Mr. Coleman of Mills & Coleman, afterward to his partner, Mr. Mills, a brother of Abner Mills, of the Dry Dock Savings Bank. Mr. Mills died in 1888. She leaves three children — Mrs. O'Reilly, Julia Coleman and George B. Coleman. her partner in the business. Mrs. Mills was active in the work of St. Patrick's Cathedral, of which her son has been a trustee for twenty years.

Her funeral will be at 10 o'clock on Wednesday, at the Cathedral, where a high mass of requiem will be celebrated.


Source: New York Tribune - 28th July 1902

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Oct 02, 2019 4:13 am

BAD EFFECTS ON THE JEWELRY TRADE

Birmingham


In the trades in Birmingham that cater particularly to the luxurious the war has had a depressing influence. Birmingham being the center of jewelry manufacture for the United Kingdom, particularly for that sold at a moderate as well as at cheap prices, this trade at once felt the effects of war. Jewelry employees were soon on half or quarter time. Makers of silver-plated goods were little occupied, but those able to manufacture cheap nickel-plated goods, suitable for Army or Navy purposes, were soon filled with orders. Then, again, the patriotic wave caused a demand for emblems indicative of patriotism. This patriotic impulse, and the desire to make it visibly manifest, has helped the jewelry trade over a difficult period, and promises with many firms to have saved them from bankruptcy. At the same time the employment of jewelers in other trades where labor was short alleviated the trying times of that industry.

Source: Supplement to Commerce Reports - 26th April 1915

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Oct 03, 2019 4:33 am

CORONATION JEWELLERY AND SILVERWARE

London


Palladium, the precious metal used for the £20,000 suite in diamonds shown at the Festival of Britain, will provide a whole range of moderately priced jewellery for coronation year.

This news, given by an official of Britain's National Jewellers' Association, marks the introduction of palladium, a lighter metal than its sister platinum, into a new market.

Hitherto the metal has been used almost exclusively in London for setting diamonds, but in these new pieces it is shown in conjunction with the coloured stones now so popular.

As the date of the coronation approaches, manufacturers are turning more and more to royal motifs for their inspiration. The exact reproduction of any of the royal crowns, however, is not allowed and Britain's Council of Industrial Design issued to manufacturers the design of a symbolic crown which is both simple and effective.

Brooches in the shape of a crown are likely to prove popular souvenirs overseas. Some have the design set inside a circle of coloured stones, while others simply display the crown set in coloured stones without a surround.

Other brooches show a large initial 'E' surmounted by a small crown, or a miniature trumpet decorated with the initials 'E.R.' One firm is designing a brooch which has miniature photographs of the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh set in red, white and blue stones.

Among a large selection of other pieces now being produced to commemorate the coronation are bangles decorated with crowns and silver eternity rings set with red, white and blue stones.

Porringers, beakers, serviette rings and sets of children's cutlery are being prepared by manufacturers of silverware . These articles are decorated with a variety of ornaments including lions and crowns and conventional, borders of lions and fleurs de lis.

Jewellery accessories, too, are to be seen in special coronation designs including cigarette cases and powder compacts which are being specially designed bearing the crown or royal cypher 'E.R.' as decoration. One firm is producing a set of compacts ornamented with drawings of Yeomen of the Guard and Lifeguards.

It is probable many of these souvenirs will be on display next February at the Gifts and Fancy Goods Fair at Harrogate.

The Coronation Souvenirs Committee, an advisory body designed to help maintain a high standard of souvenir in co-operation with manufacturers, has taken over a large room in one of the four hotels requisitioned for the fair — in order to display the souvenirs which have been approved by them.


Source: The Daily Mercury - 9th December 1952

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Oct 04, 2019 5:03 am

ROBBERY AT A CLERKENWELL CASEMAKER

London


A mysterious safe robbery is being investigated by the Clerkenwell police, who are endeavouring to trace missing jewellery of considerable value.

The theft took place at the premises of Mr Arthur White, of Myddelton-street, Clerkenwell who had received the gems from a West End firm for the purpose of making cases for their reception. The articles were placed in a safe and during the luncheon hour the door of the safe was found open and the jewellery had disappeared.

The following is an official list of the articles:- Two diamond marquise rings, one set with pearl centre and the other sapphire; an amethyst necklet, one large amethyst brooch set with pearls and diamonds round edge, one dark blue enamel brooch pendant, heart shape, with diamonds and pearls round edge, and one large amethyst and diamond brooch-pendant, round shape.


Source: Weekly Mail - 13th November 1909

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Oct 05, 2019 7:53 am

LOUIS G. FLANIGAN AND JULIUS WEINBRECHT

Newark, New Jersey


Louis G. Flanigan, who was with Kahn & Company, and Julius Weinbrecht, who was one of the firm of Burstow, Kollmar & Company have started a good plant to manufacture and repair jewelry at 20 Columbia street. They will also do plating, engraving, enameling, coloring, mesh bag work, etc.

Source: The Metal Industry - October 1913

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