The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Aug 27, 2019 6:43 am

HANS MAKART'S MODELS

Vienna


In the paintings of the late Viennese master, Hans Makart ,two stately female figures often occur. In his "Diana," his "Charles V Entering Antwerp" and many others these figures of surpassing beauty occur again and again. The originals of the pictures are now living in Vienna. They are the two daughters of Herr Klinkosch, a leading gold and silversmith of the the city. Klinkosch, the father, is an expert in his profession. Most of his work consists in designing presents for the royal family and the government, as gifts to foreign ambassadors. Makart was his intimate friend, and, receiving permission, painted his daughters as the heroines of his great paintings. Instantly they became the rage, and the Viennese court, usually so punctilious regarding questions of birth, freely welcomed the beauties immortalized by the brush of the painter. It is some years now since Makart died, but the beautiful Klinkosch sisters, although a little passe, are still seen in Vienna society. They a both unmarried.

Source: New York Telegram - June 1889

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Aug 28, 2019 3:37 am

REUBEN R. CONN

Fitchburg, Massachusetts


Fitchburg, Mass., Oct. 9.—Reuben R. Conn, a leading jeweler and silversmith of Fltchburg, died from a paralytic shock at the age of 82.

He leaves a widow, one son, Prof. Herbert W. Conn of Wesleyan university, and two daughters, Mrs. J. H.Potter and Mrs. Oscar Kuhns, wife of Fred Kuhns of Wesleyan.


Source: Los Angeles Herald - 10th October 1907

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Aug 29, 2019 4:26 am

JEWELLER TRICKS PAWNBROKERS

Birmingham


Mr. Lucas, a manufacturing jeweller, of Caroline street, Birmingham, was on Monday committed for trial for victimising different Jewish pawnbrokers, by pledging spurious mixed metal, representing the same to be silver.

Source: The Monmouthshire Merlin and South Wales Advertiser - 31st October 1884

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Aug 30, 2019 3:44 am

OFFENSIVE ADVERTISEMENT AGAINST JAPAN

Sydney


Press Association—Telegraph—Copyright SYDNEY, November 6. Acting on a petition signed by twelve leading Japanese merchants of Sydney, the acting-Consul-General for Japan has written to Mr R. P. Orchard, a leading jeweller, requesting the withdrawal of an advertisement displayed on the railway stations and trams, depicting a fearsome looking Japanese soldier extending a hand, with clutching fingers, over Australia.

The advertisement bears the legend, “Australians watch your interests at Orchard’s,” the word “watch” being a pun.

Orchard’s manager agreed to withdraw the advertisement.


Source: The Wanganui Herald - 7th November 1913

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Aug 31, 2019 5:32 am

GOODWOOD RACE PLATE

London


.....Something also of public spirit may be credited to a business firm on this side the Atlantic, Messrs. Hunt & Roskell, the eminent silversmiths; who, having to produce the Goodwood Race Plate of the present year, have gone to so distinguished a sculptor as Mr. Bailey for the design. Of the plate itself, I am not speaking, as I have not seen it, nor yet offering or implying an opinion as to the merits of Mr. Bailey; the point to be noted is that businessmen, having to turn out a work for sporting patrons, apply to a sculptor than whom none perhaps enjoys a higher artistic reputation, and that for works of high subject.

Source: The Crayon - 1st October 1856

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Sep 01, 2019 7:14 am

A NOW WISER MAN

New York


After spending a pleasant evening with a new-found friend, Louis Schmidt, a stranger in this city, and a representative for a Chicago jewelry firm, found himself, upon regaining consciousness, in Wilmington, minus his newly acquired friend and also his full line of jewelry samples which amounted to several thousand dollars. His gold watch and $260 in cash were also gone. Schmidt is 23 years old. He is still somewhat dazed by his unfortunate experience.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 18th October 1911

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Sep 02, 2019 3:26 am

COINCIDENCE AT JEWELLERS

London


A London jeweller relates that some five years ago a very interesting young engaged couple - both she and he being well known in society at the time - selected a wedding ring in his shop. A month later a paragraph appeared in the 'Morning Post' announcing that the marriage would not take place, and the same week the young man brought, back the ring and exchanged it for a pearl scarf-pin. Recently the same young man appeared in the same shop and again asked to see some wedding rings. While he was choosing one, who should walk in but the lady with and for whom he had selected the first ring. She was now married, had three children, and came to purchase a scarf-pin for her husband. She and her first love greeted one another apparently for the first time since her marriage, and she helped him to choose the second wedding ring.

Source: Evening News - December 1898

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Sep 03, 2019 3:06 am

GIRL MARRIES SILVERSMITH'S CORPSE

Nanking


Nanking:, (From Stanley A. Bond, A.A.P. - Reuter Correspondent). Nanking Chinese press recently splashed a moving story of a girl who was married to a corpse.

A young silversmith named Sun was engaged to a girl named Ho. They were to be married on March,15, but, unfortunately Sun died suddenly of a strange malady two days earlier.

Miss Ho rushed to the home of her fiance and, embracing the corpse, began to cry her eyes out. Then she insisted on marrying the spirit of her beloved. She said: "I was destined to be a member of the Sun family in life, and after death I would like to be a ghost of the Sun family also."

After some hours passed, members of both families insisted on her returning to her own home for rest, quite sure that she would change her mind. However, the girl didn't and employed all kinds of threats to realise her desires.

Finally, a unique marriage took place amid a funeral setting, and the girl was married to her dead sweetheart.


Source: Goulburn Evening Post - 8th April 1948

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Sep 04, 2019 3:49 am

A. LUDWIG & Co.

New York


A. Ludwig, who is well known to the trade as the originator of the well-known curio silver novelties, and who has been designer and superintendent for George W. Sheibler for the last nine years, has opened a factory for the manufacture of sterling silverware, in all its branches for the trade only at No. 247 and 249 Centre street (Trenkman Building), N. Y., under the firm name of A. Ludwig & Co. His ability and taste are generally recognized throughout the country, and the trade will look for a fine lot of samples from the new factory.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 4th February 1891

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Sep 05, 2019 3:21 am

JEWELLERS' ACCUSATIONS AGAINST A NUN

Paris


Sister Candide, the well-known Superior of the Ormesson nuns, and a prominent figure in the charitable world of France, is accused of detaining over half a million francs' worth of goods, belonging to two Paris jewellers. Sister Candide, whose real name is Forestier, is over 50 years old. She has devoted the last twenty years of her life to good works, including the establishment of creches and hospitals for the poor. Her most important work was the organisation of the famous Ormesson Anti-Tuberculosis Institution and the creation of hospitals for tuberculus children at Ormesson, Noisy-le-Sec, and San Salvador.

M. Loubet, ex-President of the Republic, used to be at the head of the Ormesson Committee. By means of charitable lotteries. Sister Candide raised considerable sums of money, which enabled her to build hospitals and keep them in good condition. Some years ago the lady, as a recognition of her valuable services, was decorated with the Legion of Honour by the then Prime Minister, M. Waldeck-Rousseau.

The Paris jewellers, MM. Dagnaux and M. Peyret, who have lodged the present complaint against Sister Candide, state that some time ago they entrusted her with jewellery of great value, which she was to dispose of on commission. Since then they have not received the value of the jewels, and Sister Candide, they allege, refuses to hand the jewellery back.

On hearing of the charges made against her, the accused came herself to the office of the judge d'instruction to offer him an explanation. She said that having fallen into financial difficulties on account of the failure of her last lotteries, and desiring to keep on her hospitals where so many sick are treated, she conceived the idea of making money by the sale of jewels amongst her rich friends. She applied to the two jewellers, M. Dagnaux, who entrusted her with £23,200 worth of jewels, and the other, M. Peyret, sent her jewels to the value of £3,120. She denied that any fraud had been practised. "Within a year both of the jewellers will be paid by instalments," she said.

"But where are the jewels?" asked the judge. "I have entrusted them to honest and charitable friends, who will sell them."

The judge explained to the guileless sister that the jewellers must know to whom she had entrusted their jewellery.

"I cannot give you their names," was the answer. "My conscience tells me not to do so."

She denied that the jewels had been pawned partly at the Mont de Piete, and partly in London, as it had been rumoured. No proceedings have been definitely taken against Sister Candide, who appears to be a victim of mischance and to have acted innocently for the good of her charitable work. Searches have been made at the sister's house, but nothing to incriminate her was discovered.


Source: The Weekly Mail - 21st May 1910

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Sep 06, 2019 4:21 am

BRAITHWAITE & JONES

London


A curious bill case was partly argued in the Exchequer Court on Thursday— Lord Muncaster, being in want of money, applied to one of the parties, by whom an advertisement had been inserted in a newspaper, offering temporary accommodation to individuals requiring assistance of that description. The application introduced his Lordship to a person of the name of Alves ; who undertook to procure his Lordship immediately the sum of 2,500l., and his Lordship accepted bills for that amount, which were drawn in favour of Alves. These bills his Lordship. handed over to Alves, together with a warrant-of-attorney as a collateral security. One of these bills, which was for 1,000l., was payable at the end of three months; it was handed over by Alves to a person of the name of Welch and by Welch to Messrs. Braithwaite and Jones, silversmiths. Messrs. Braithwaite and Jones consented to discount the bill, upon condition that one-half was taken in plate. That arrangement was acceded to, and 500l. therefore was handed over to Welch, with different articles of plate to cover the other half.

Lord Muncaster, when the bill became due, refused to pay it, on the plea that it had been obtained by fraud. Some of the articles of plate were noticed by his Lordship's counsel. Among them was a soup-tureen, weighing 350 ounces, charged, at the prime cost price, at 112l. 3s. 11d. ; and upon that item 18l. was charged for interest, from the time it was sold until the bill became due. Four sauce-tureens were charged at 59l. 16s. and the interest on them 7l. 15s. Some candlesticks were charged at 40l., although the very identical articles had, about the same time, been purchased by Messrs. Braithwaite and Jones for 30l. Besides the interest upon the plate, Messrs. Braithwaite and Jones had charged interest upon the bill.

The case was adjourned till next motion-day.


Source: The Spectator - 24th November 1832

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Sep 07, 2019 3:22 am

SHORTAGE AMIDST PLENTY

United States


About 5,000,000 ounces of silver monthly is being mined in the United States, which is ample to care for war needs, but not enough for ordinary commercial needs, especially for the silver industry of New England.

The silver industry, which makes knives, forks and household ware, formerly used alloys and critical materials - all of which have now been dispensed with. However, silver is not a critical material. There is plenty mined for the war effort but not enough to supply the 80,000,000 ounces needed annually for the silver industry.

So New England silversmiths now ask that they be permitted to buy a mere 80.000,000 ounces out of the two and a half billion ounces which the Treasury has buried. They point out that the Treasury bought silver to keep it from being a drug on the market and to help the Rocky Mountain states. So now they would like to buy a small part and put it back into use.

However, the Treasury says no - unless there is an act of Congress.


Source: The Michigan Daily - 21st August 1942

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Sep 08, 2019 5:24 am

JEWELER'S SON KIDNAPPED

Providence, Rhode Island


Son of Providence Jeweler Escapes from Kidnappers After Being Held Captive 24 Hours

Providence, R. I., Aug. 15.—Kidnapped in broad daylight by two strange men, carried to a tent in a swamp near the banks of Narragansett Bay, tied there and held captive until he effected his release 24 hours later, is the strange tale unfolded by 12-year-old Earle Griffith, to his father, Rufus K. Griffith, shipping clerk at the manufacturing jewelry establishment of R. L. Griffith & Son Co., a few days ago.

The little fellow was seen playing not far from his home during the early afternoon, but suddenly disappeared. When his father returned home later in the afternoon a search was instituted, without success. The police were notified and the entire night was spent in the vain hunt for the missing child. The hunt was continued in the morning, but it was not until late in the afternoon that the boy, having succeeded in releasing himself, made his way out of the swamp and was found shortly afterward by his father. The little fellow when questioned concerning his prolonged absence related his story of his detention. The police made an exhaustive investigation and proved the truth of the boy’s story, but were unable to obtain any trace of the men of whom he spoke.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 19th August 1908

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Sep 09, 2019 4:00 am

INGE KING

Melbourne


A silversmith who studied jewellery and design at the Glasgow School of Art and in London yesterday exhibited the results of her studies at the Stanley Coe Gallery.

She is Czechslovakian born Mrs. Inge King, whose jewellery and sculpture are being shown together with an art display by her husband, Grahame King.

All the jewellery Is unique, for Mrs. King does not repeat a design. One beautiful bird-shaped pendant was raised on a piece of silver, decorated with gold and set with garnets.

Tiny corals decorated a set of earrings and heavy choker in sterling silver, and there were several pieces of exquisite repousee work.

Mrs. King, who does only privately commissioned work, has been living in Melbourne for nine months since arriving from England.


Source: The Argus - 28th November 1951

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Sep 10, 2019 3:57 am

CARTIER ESTATE PURCHASED

Roslyn Harbor, Long Island, New York


Roslyn, Jan. 8 - The large estate of Pierre Cartier, prominent jeweler, has been purchased by Mrs Sarah Wiler Hughes, wife of Dr. Wendell L. Hughes of 131 Fulton Ave., Hempstead. The estate covers 19 acres.

Source: The Brooklyn Daily Eagle - 9th January 1944

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Sep 11, 2019 5:26 am

VULGARITIES OF ENGLISH JEWELLERY DESIGN

London


A recent article in our columns on "Vulgarities of English Jewellery Design" seems to have attracted a good deal of attention, from the number of quotations, criticisms, and letters in regard to it which, have reached us. Some of the letters have expressed the most cordial gratitude to us for thus "showing up" the taste of the average jeweller and the average public in such matters; most of the newspaper comments express sympathy, and the trade organs of the goldsmiths and jewellers, one or two of which have been considerately forwarded to us, seem to be literally choking with anger, and relieve their feelings by contemptuous remarks on the presumption of a "trade paper for builders" pretending to know anything of jewellery design. Probably these good people know perfectly well that they are printing a falsehood, and that this is an architectural journal dealing with artistic as well as with constructive subjects; but we observed a remark in a journal of a higher class—the St. James's Gazette—to the effect that an architectural journal was "not a quarter in which one would expect to find such a subject treated." Now that is just the mistake of the St. James's Gazette, and of some other papers and persons. The art of designing jewellery and silversmiths' work is the same art as architectural detail and ornament, carried out on a minute scale and in more precious materials. He who understands the one understands the other, and as a matter of fact some of the finest designers of this class of work have been architects,, alike in the Medieval, the Renaissance, and the modem period.

Source: The Builder - 7th November 1891

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Sep 12, 2019 3:46 am

MANHATTAN SILVER PLATE Co.

Lyons, New York


There are 125 persons now employed at the Manhattan Silver Plate Co.’s works, Lyons, N. Y.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 9th March 1892

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Sep 13, 2019 4:53 am

THE SPLENDID BANQUET AT GOLDSMITHS' HALL

London


On Saturday the Goldsmiths' Company gave a magnificent banquet at their hall to the Duke of Wellington, Sir Robert Peel, and several other eminent public men.

The preparations were, it is believed, upon a more gorgeous scale than any within the recollection of the members of this most opulent and powerful of the great Conservative companies of the city of London. Indeed such pains had been taken to give splendour to the scene as to give rise to the report that the give splendour to the scene as to give rise to the report that the Queen was to be the guest of the company.

Alderman Copeland, Prime Warden, in the chair; supported on his right by the Archbishop of Canterbury, and on his left by the Duke of Wellington.

Amongst the company were the Duke of Rutland, the Marquess of Londonderry, the Earl of Jersey, the Earl de Grey, the Bishop of Winchester, the Bishop of Llandaff, the Bishop of Chester, Lord Lyndhurst, Lord Bexley, Lord Tenterden, Lord Abinger, the Marquess of Chandos, Lord Stanley, Lord Mahon, Lord Ingestrie, Lord Eliot, Lord Sandon, the Chief Justice of the Common Pleas, Sir Robert Peel, See. &.c.

The sideboard immediately behind the chairman was covered with massive gold plate, piled up in a pyramidical form, and so arranged as to exhibit in the most striking manner the taste employed by the superintendents of the feast, as well as the enormous wealth of the company, who make it a rule never to borrow from the companies, the means of adding to the effect of their entertainment. In the recess behind the chair, in the midst of other pieces, stood an ancient dish and ewer, which were made 150 years ago by the celebrated Lemarie. They were highly embossed, and of exquisite workmanship. Vases and candelabra were thickly placed in the recess, which would have continued to attract the notice of the guests, if their attention had not been led away by an unrivalled work of art which stood on the cross table immediately before the chairman. This was a plateau of gold, representing an ancient garden, with terrace and balustrades. There are steps leading up to the terrace, and in different parts of the garden are groups of children in mimicry of the art and mystery of the silversmiths, hammering away at vases and other decorative work. The terrace is surrounded by a lake of water, most beautifully represented by costly mirrors, while four cascades are seen gushing from an archway, over which appear the arms of the Goldsmiths' Company, in the centre of the plateau a group of figures are seen supporting branches of lights. Cupids are climbing up the branches of the trees, while the Graces arc endeavouring to catch the mischievous little gods in their ascent. Costly pieces of plate, of various forms and dimensions, were most tastefully disposed round the tables. One of them was a cup, the workmanship, if not of Cellini himself, of an eminent pupil of that great master. This Cup had been presented by Queen Elizabeth to Sir Martin Bowen, Lord Mayor of London, when that sovereign first visited the city of London. Sir Martin was a member of the Goldsmiths' Company, and by his will left this cup to the company.

The toasts, which, as the evening advanced, became deeply tinged with a political complexion, embraced "The Church and Queen;" "The Bishop of Durham;" "The Duke of Wellington" (received with bursts of applause) "Lord Lyndhurst;" "Sir Robert Peel" "Sir Nicholas Tyndal; &e.

The Chairman, in proposing "The health of the noble lord the member for North Lancashire," said he had not had the honour of seeing his lordship in the city except upon one occasion, and that was in his mayoralty [the company here cheered Lord Stanley]. He was aware that they were not assembled for political objects, nor for political discussion, but it was impossible to forget the circumstance of the secession from office of the noble lord with the right honourable baronet, involving a subject so near and dear to those around. He trusted, however, that the country would soon have the gratification of seeing them again co-operating in power, for the protection of its best interests. (Cheers.)

Lord Stanley said that he was taken by surprise, but he felt deeply grateful for the high distinction to which the company were pleased to consider him entitled. He had made considerable sacrifices in the performance of his public duties, but he had made those sacrifices from principle, and he should be ready upon future occasions, should any arise, to make similar sacrifices for the good of the community. With reference to future events, he believed, so far as he was capable of judging of probabilities, so far as his foresight was able to penetrate, he should most cordially co-operate with the right honourable baronet, in connection with whose name his had been joined. (Cheers.)

Sir Charles Wetherell (his health and the bar having been given) said, that although the prime warden had said that they had not assembled for political discussion, and had intimated that politics were not likely to be introduced on occasions of this kind, he happened to be more years in the world, and therefore was obliged to say that it was quite impossible but that politics must ooze in and out, even in their times of conviviality and enjoyment. A laugh and cheers. He joined in the hope that a speedy termination would be put to the well-grounded alarms which existed, by the appointment of men able and honest enough to serve the country.

The facetious knight creditably appeared in a clean shirt, and the adoption of suspenders indicated an inexpressible improvement on his appearance in public heretofore. It is quite needless to say a word about the quality of the dishes and the wines.

All the delicacies that money could purchase were in profusion upon the tables.


Source: The Monmouthshire Merlin - 5th May 1838

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Sep 14, 2019 5:53 am

NEW DESIGNS IN ENGLISH SILVER

London


London — Young British silversmiths are turning from traditional English designs to more contemporary patterns.

They are focusing their attention on what the modern housewife wants, such as, for example, the introduction of the silver pepper mills.

The silver industry noticed how popular the wooden grinders were and set about designing one in silver.

Silver cigarette and cigar boxes with inlaid enamel work, which, were first produced with Royal emblems as coronation souvenirs, have proved so popular that they are still being produced in modified form.

The newest gift for card players is a set of four tiny, elegant silver pencils, decorated with a heart, club, diamond or spade.


Source: The Evening Advocate - 8th September 1954

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Sep 15, 2019 4:30 am

PAY JEWELER HIS OWN MONEY

Paris


Parisian Swindlers Inveigle Merchant Into Signing Name to Order for Three Hundred Pounds

A very clever swindle was successfully carried out In the Rue de la Pali, Paris. A carriage drove up to a large Jeweler’s shop, and an elderly man,
with his arm In a sling, accompanied by a footman, who carried a rug, entered the shop.

The gentleman selected and bought some three hundred pounds’ worth of Jewelry, and then said, “If you do not mind, I will send my man home for the money.” The Jeweler bowed, and the gentleman continued: “I should be pleased If you would write for me. I have hurt my arm. Just write, ‘Please give Robert three hundred pounds,’ and sign It ‘Henri.’ ”

The Jeweler wrote as he was directed, and in a quarter of an hour the footman came back with the money, and then he, with his master, left with the Jewelry.

When the Jeweler went home to dinner his wife asked him the reason he had sent for three hundred pounds. Then the swindle was discovered. The rogues knew that the Jeweler’s name was Henri, and they had got him to write the note for the money, which was taken to his wife, and then they paid him for the jewels with his own money.


Source: The Eureka Sentinel - 15th June 1918

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