The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Apr 04, 2019 3:05 am

THE PEARY EFFECT

Providence, Rhode Island


North Pole jewelry and novelties is the latest offering of the T. W. Lind Co., findings manufacturers, of this city. These include “Cook bears,” “Peary seals,’’ reindeers, snowshoes, sledges, Eskimos and similar articles suggestive of the Arctic.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 6th October 1909

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Apr 05, 2019 1:40 am

ANNUAL CONFERENCE OF THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF GOLDSMITHS - 1907

Chester


The annual conference of the National Association of Goldsmiths took place at the Grosvenor Hotel, Chester, on Monday. The late Mr. A. W. Butt took a great interest in this association, and was vice-chairman at the time of his death, just prior to which he had invited the association to hold its 1907 conference here. Out of compliment to their late member the association decided to come to Chester, and the result has been a very successful reunion. The business of the conference occupied the whole of Monday. The meetings were attended by members from all over the country. Mr. Walter Bull, a member of the Corporation of the City of London, presided. The annual report congratulated the association on the passing of the Imported Watch Cases Bill, which came into force on June 1st this year, and which gives absolute protection to the traders of this country. The report also stated that the association's persistent and drastic campaign against the instalment houses and their tallymen was gradually but surely exterminating those "parasites." Mr. J. Hodgson, of Exeter, said the Imported Watch Cases Bill was calculated to do a great deal of good to English trade, and his remarks were corroborated by other speakers. Mr. John Dyson (Leeds) said the importation of foreign rubbish for many years had greatly injured the reputation of their honourable craft, but we should presently get back to the time when a lady or gentleman would be proud to take out his or her watch and show it.

A discussion took place with reference to the practice of auctioneers of good reputation allowing their names to be used in regard to sales of bogus jewellery. The hon. secretary was asked to write to the Auctioneers' Institute asking them to discourage the practice.

The election of officers for the ensuing year took place, with the following result:—Chairman. Mr. J. Dyson, Leeds; vice-chairman, Mr. J. Hodgson, Exeter; hon. treasurer, Mr. Walter Bull, London; hon. organising secretary, Mr. Thomas Field, Aylesbury: solicitor, Mr. Lepper; auditor. Mr. J. Garland Godwin. When the chairman was elected, Mr. Walter Bull, the retiring chairman, invested his successor with the jewel of office. Mr. Richards, of Cork, a genial Irishman, who was the life of the company, came forward, and in his best national brogue begged Mr. Dyson to accept a handsome jade stone, from New Zealand. He said since it had been given to him he had always had good luck. He hoped it would bring Mr. Dyson good luck, although he would still have some luck left for himself. (Cheers.)—The council were re-elected, with alterations, one of the new members being Mr. S. Barnett, of Chester. An animated discussion took place during the afternoon session relating to the new rules. Mr. Levy, of Ply- mouth, rose to speak, and his right to do so was challenged by the chairman. He claimed that he joined the Plymouth branch under a rule which made him also a member of the National Association, but the chairman contended that only members who paid their subscriptions direct to the hon. treasurer could be recognised. It transpired that this disadvantage applied to nearly all the Plymouth members. After an angry debate the meeting allowed the members affected to take part in the proceedings, their position being due to a misunderstanding. The new rules, it was stated, would avoid a repetition of this difficulty. In further debates, Mr. Yeates, of Penrith. advocated that jewellers should take up the optical trade more largely, he remarking that chemists were running them out of a business which really belonged to jewellers.

At the close of the business Mr. R. Marsh raised the question of the new hallmarks for foreign watches, and asked the chairman whether the new arrangement would be beneficial for the trade. He did not think any foreign watch ought to come into this country and receive our official assay mark. Every country should adopt its own mark. The Chairman said the new system was a very good thing for the trade. The foreign hallmark was absolutely different from the English hallmark. He hoped he should not be breaking the rules if he said he was a very strong Protectionist, and he thought the new system was a grand step in the right direction. (Hear, hear.) Mr. G. B. Lowe, at the invitation of the chairman, gave some explanation of the new marks. He said there could not be the slightest mistake in regard to foreign gold or silver which had received a hallmark in England. There was no lion on the foreign hallmark. Each of the halls had adopted their own mark, and the Chester office had adopted the badge of the Cheshire Regiment for the purpose.

TRIBUTE TO THE CITY

The annual banquet was held on Monday evening, when a large company sat down in the assembly-room of the Grosvenor Hotel, under the presidency of Mr. J. Dyson. The manageress (Miss Lockwood) had provided an excellent menu, the most conspicuous course being "Chat de Cheshire," which was a triumph of skill on the part of the chef, who carried the dish around the room. In addition to the members of the association, including Dr. Butt and Messrs. G. B. Lowe, F. R. Brown and S. Barnett, were several guests. The Sheriff (Mr. R. H. Lanceley) sat next to the chairman, and others present were the Town Clerk (Mr. J. H. Dickson), Alderman R. Cecil Davies, the Chief Constable (Mr. J. H. Laybourne), and Messrs. T. Moore Dutton, S. Percy Davies, G. A. Bowers, etc.

The toast of the National Goldsmiths' Association was proposed by Dr. Butt, and the Chairman responded.

Mr. Walter Bull proposed "The City of Chester" in a graceful speech. If he might dilate for a moment on the city, he would say of its antiquity that it seemed to have come up wet with the spray of the Deluge. (Laughter.) In another simile lie would say it was in existence when Adam delved and Eve spun, and he suggested that, as there was no evidence to the contrary, he was correct. Continuing, Mr. Bull said: In this wonderful city of yours—for me it is a wonderful city - I have visited your Cathedral, and I was interested in its magnificent service yesterday morning. (Hear, hear.) I saw your beautiful effigies and statues and monuments, and the magnificent mosaics on its walls, and I looked with admiration upon the beautiful screen which nothing but love could have wrought. It is not the outcome of the labours of men who work for wages alone it is the result of the efforts of men who have worked for the glory of their Creator, and nothing but that can produce such beauty. When I see your wondrous architecture, I say this city stands out pre-eminent throughout the whole length and breadth of the land. (Applause.) I know no other that can approach it, and I know of no place to which so many flock. It Is, as it were, a Mecca for all those who live in America or on the Continent, and who gather here to worship at this shrine. In your glorious history and tradition you stand out far above any other city in this England of ours. (Hear, hear. ) The Sheriff responded, in the unavoidable absence of the Mayor. In thanking Mr Bull, he said he had not told one half the story. (Hear, hear.) Our grand old city stood out pre-eminent without a rival in the land, whether it was regarded from the point of antiquity, or architecture, or natural beauty.

In the subsequent toasts, Alderman Cecil Davies responded for the visitors, and Mr. G. B. Lowe replied on behalf of the ladies. A musical programme was provided by Mr. Benyon's band, and Miss Francis Jones. Mr. J. H. Ditchburn and Mr. A. Armstrong.

On Tuesday the party went for an excursion into Wales, visiting Chirk Castle, Glyn Ceiriog and Llangollen, returning to Chester in the evening. Wednesday morning was spent in viewing the attractions of the city, and in the afternoon by a steamer trip up the Dee to Eaton Hall. On Monday afternoon, while the meeting was being held, the ladies of the party were taken for a drive to Hawarden, returning for tea to the residence of Mrs. A. W. Butt in Curzon Park. Tho local committee consists of Dr. Butt, Mr. G. B. Lowe, Mr. James Lowe and Mr. F. G. Brown, while the local secretarial work was carried out by Mr. S. Barnett managing director Messrs. Butt and Co., Ltd.


Source: The Cheshire Observer - 13th July 1907

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Apr 06, 2019 5:11 am

THE EFFECT OF THE BOER WAR ON THE DIAMOND MARKET

South Africa


Owing to the cutting off of the Kimberley output, four large diamond-cutting houses of Hanau, Prussia, have closed down. In Antwerp three thousand men have been thrown out of employment by the closing of the lapidary establishments, and in Amsterdam twenty-five hundred men. The correspondents abroad do not take a cheerful view of the situation. The diamond importers are not viewing the situation with absolute complacency. They point out that if the Boers are victorious they may take a notion to put the entire output of the mines on the market at "bargain prices," in order to raise money. The syndicate which controls the output has always held back a portion of the yield, and if there should be a wholesale marketing of the gems without any restraint, the consequent fall in prices might be ruinous to those who have stock on hand.

Source: The Argonaut - 26th February 1900

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Apr 07, 2019 3:24 am

CLEMENT MFG. COMPANY

New York


Clement Mfg. Company, 75 Chambers street, New York, and Northampton, Mass., have for many years confined themselves almost exclusively to manufacturing high grade Steel Blades and solid Steel Blanks used by silversmiths and plated ware manufacturers in their sterling silver, pearl, ivory and plated hollow handle Table Cutlery. They determined during the past year to enlarge the scope of their business, and since then have fitted up to produce a full line of Stag, Rubber, Celluloid, Ivory and Pearl Handle Goods in Dessert, Medium and Table Knives, Carving Knives and Forks, Table Steels, &c. They announce that all goods offered will be free from imperfections as to quality of materials, workmanship and finish, and court critical inspection by intending purchasers.

The line will include a variety of new styles, supplementary to those now regularly known to the trade. A large assortment of standard patterns are now ready and others are being added as promptly as the making of new dies will permit. The company have for the present adopted the plan of issuing illustrated sheets, 8 x 10 inches in size, giving numbers sizes, &c., which later will be replaced by a catalogue in book form. Those who desire prices or further information can address W. M. Caldwell, who has charge of the marketing of the goods, at the New York address given above.


Source: The Iron Age - 15th February 1894

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Apr 08, 2019 4:08 am

THE PEARY EFFECT - II

Providence, Rhode Island


A copper medal about the size of an old-fashioned cent has been brought out by P. A. Willemin, designer, diemaker and toolmaker at 95 Pine St., as an advertising medium. On one side is shown a polar bear on a cake of ice, carrying off the North Pole, with his card on the other side.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 6th October 1909

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Apr 09, 2019 4:38 am

LOTTERY WINNER

Oxford


A young man, named Lawson, son of a working silversmith of Oxford, is the winner in the Dublin lottery of the ex-Lady Mayoress's state chariot, horses, and harness, value 400 guineas.

Source: The Brecon Reporter - 10th June 1865

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Apr 10, 2019 1:57 am

PLATINUM 1987

London


Platinum's latest show of strength owes a good deal to sentiment in the gold market, “ without, however, being in danger of losing the individuality it has re-acquired since mid 1985," observes Johnson Matthey, the London bullion trader, in its recently-published review “Platinum 1987”. Johnson Matthey sees this as “a further demonstration of platinum’s twin attributes as a precious as well as an industrial metal”.

According to Johnson Matthey, non-industrial demand accounted for 45.7 per cent of last year’s record total Western world platinum consumption of 2.85m oz. compared with 34.9 per cent of 2.32m oz in 1982. That share increase was due to a surge is investment demand from 2 per cent (46,000 oz) to 15.7 per cent (447.000 oz).

While jewellery’s consumption share was down from 1982's 32.9 per cent to 30 per cent in 1986, it still represented a rise of 90,000 oz. And about 40,000 oz of the rise came between 1985 and 1986, a performance which surprised many market experts, who had assumed that high prices would be reflected in lower jewellery usage.

The platinum jewellery sector is heavily dependent on Japanese demand. “They love the stuff,” says Patrick Smith of Johnson Matthey. Of the 855,000 oz purchased by the jewellery trade in 1986 some 740,000 oz went to Japan, according to Platinum 1987.


Source: Financial Times - 22nd June 1987

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Apr 13, 2019 6:28 am

HENRY M. EATON

Boston, Massachusetts


Dying almost instantly from heart disease, Henry M. Eaton, 75 years old, a skilful gold and silver engraver, was discovered by his friends, Feb. 20, in the retiring room of the Crawford House. Hoping that some spark of life was left, the body was hurriedly sent to the Relief Hospital, where the physicians pronounced the death as instantaneous and due to heart disease.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 4th March 1908

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Apr 14, 2019 7:22 am

JEWELLERY ROBBERY IN DUBLIN

Dublin


A strange robbery has been perpetrated at the Central Hotel, Dublin. Messrs Martin and Hall, jewellers, of Sheffield, forwarded 24 cases of samples to Mr Crossley, their representative in Dublin, and they were duly delivered at the hotel. Subsequently one of the cases was found to be missing. The contents are valued at over £500. The matter is in the hands of the police.

Source: South Wales Daily News - 8th June 1892

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Apr 15, 2019 2:56 am

SILVER SERVICE FOR H.M.C.S. RAINBOW

Canada


The Goldsmiths and Silversmiths' Company of London has just completed the magnificent service of plate which is to be presented by the province of British Columbia to H. M. C. S. Rainbow. The centrepiece bears the following inscription: " Presented by the province of British Columbia to H. M. C. S. Rainbow in welcome recognition of this being the first vessel of the Canadian navy to be stationed on the Pacific coast of the Dominion, and with the loyal hope and belief that the Rainbow and her successors may fulfil their part in uniting and strengthening the naval defences of the Empire—1911."

Source: The Orchard City Record - 23rd February 1911

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Apr 16, 2019 5:04 am

A WATCHFUL COW

Mason City, Iowa


Seven years ago a farmer living west of this city hung his vest on a fence in the barnyard. A calf chewed up a pocket of the garment in which was a standard gold watch. Last week the animal, a staid old milch cow, was butchered for beef, and the timepiece was found in such a position between the lungs of the cow that the respiration —the closing in and the filling of the lungs—kept the stemwinder wound up, and the watch had lost but four minutes in the seven years!

Source: Mason City Globe-Gazette - February 1920

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Apr 17, 2019 2:40 am

NO SOVEREIGNS IN CIRCULATION

London


The British sovereign is not to be restored to circulation for some time, according to dispatches from England. A commission of bankers and financial men, after considering the question, recommended that for the present at least gold be concentrated in one central reserve in the Bank of England. Circulation of gold was termed by the commission "neither necessary or desirable".

Source: The Trader and Canadian Jeweller - July 1920

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Apr 18, 2019 4:01 am

ANTAL BACHRUCH

Budapest


A somewhat singular action has arisen in Vienna over a couple of pearls which the late Count Moriz Esterhazy bought for £4,400 from the Court jeweller Bachruch, in Buda-Pesth. The count, who died two years ago, had the pearls made into buttons, and presented them to his wife. The pearls were not paid for when the count died, and the countess declined to pay for them on the ground that the price was too high. The matter was brought into the courts. The jeweller offered to take the pearls back, but the countess declined to part with them, saying that they were a memento of her husband. She offered to settle the matter if the jeweller would knock £1,200 off the price. The jeweller declined to do this. Then experts were called in to testify as to the value of the pearls. Each differed as to their worth. One placed their value at £3,200; another said they were worth quite £6,000; a third expert made somewhat random guesses - they might be worth £4,000, £6,000 or even £8,000 he said. The judge has been landed into a dilemma by this multiplicity of advisers. He will take time to consider his judgment.

Source: Evening Express and Evening Mail - 5th June 1903

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Apr 19, 2019 6:11 am

DEATH OF EVERETT B. BLISS

Attleboro, Massachusetts


Attleboro, Mass., Aug. 6.—Everett B. Bliss, for years a successful jewelry manufacturer and known to all the older generation in the trade, passed away suddenly at his home Thursday. He is particularly remembered as one of the firm of Bliss Bros.

Mr. Bliss was at his Peck St. home Wednesday noon, strolling across the yard, when a stroke of paralysis felled him to the ground. He arose and reached the house, but greatly weakened. His brother, Charles E. Bliss, was hastily summoned, and shortly after his arrival a second attack brought unconsciousness. Medical aid was secured, but proved unavailing. The funeral, held at his late home to-day, was wholly private.

Mr. Bliss was nearly 67 years of age, the greater part of his life being spent in Attleboro. He was one of 13 children, and inured to a life of hard work and ambitious effort. With his brother Charles he founded in 1873 the Bliss Bros.’ concern, making the name favorably known all over the country. About 10 years ago he sold his interests to his brother and retired to comparative quiet, devoting his principal attention to his large real estate holdings.

He and his brother erected on opposite sides of Peck St. large, handsome and very similar residences, from both of which radiated influences of kindness, charity to the needy, inspiration to younger men and a fine quality of Christian citizenship.

Five years ago Charles E. Bliss followed Everett into retirement from business, but has devoted his leisure to public service in many positions of trust. The manufacturing house they started has been incorporated as the Bliss Bros. Co., in the hands of the younger generation in the family.

Everett B. Bliss leaves a war record of which he rarely spoke, but of which his descendants may well be proud. He was early to enlist in the Union army, and was in a long succession of battles and arduous experiences. He rarely drew attention to himself, but took pleasure in the annual reunions of his old regiment.

Deceased leaves a widow, a son, Milton, in business in Providence, R. I., and a son, Edward, in business in Canada.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 8th August 1906

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Apr 20, 2019 6:44 am

JEWELRY MANUFACTURER IN WHIRLWIND ROMANCE

New York


New York, July 1. A desperate three-month siege by two millionaires for the hand of a little 19-year-old hotel newsgirl ended the other day when Nan Corrigan left her stand in the great Vanderbilt hotel here to become the bride of Frank M. Bates, jewelry manufacturer of Attleboro, Mass.

It was early in January when the new hotel was first opened that Bates noticed the simple, unassuming girl behind the paper and magazine counter. He contrasted her unassuming beauty with that of the proud dames that strutted up and down "Peacock Alley' as the great blue-green corridor is called. And he was unanimously in favor of Nan's looks.

So was a millionaire widower from Buffalo, who was also a guest at the hotel. And then the fun began. Nan was besieged with flowers and candy and trinkets by the score. And then, as the month of brides and roses came, she surrendered her heart to Bates.

"He's more my age," she said, "and I love him. I am sorry that anyone had to be hurt by my decision. But I have to marry the man I like the most."

Bates brought his mother down from her mansion in the hills of Massachusetts to see the little newsgirl. She met her and then she turned to Bates and said, ''You have chosen wisely, my son. She is a real woman and will make a good wife."

All Bates' family were present when Nan was married and they showered her with costly gifts. Bates gave her a casket of jewels and an automobile.

When the ceremony was ended he made over a great deal of his property to the little girl who, just two weeks ago, was selling the papers over the counter at the Vanderbilt hotel.


Source: The Day Book - 1st July 1912

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Apr 21, 2019 7:00 am

DEATH OF JOSH. W. MAYER

New York


MILLIONAIRE JEWELER AND MAGICIAN DIES

Josh W. Mayer’s Hobby Was Entertainment of Children Throughout Country


By the Associated Press

NEW YORK. October 5.—Josh W. Mayer, 67, millionaire diamond jewelry manufacturer, whose hobby for 35 years was the entertainment of children throughout the country with magicians' tricks, died yesterday after a brief illness.

He was the president-founder of Powers & Mayer. Inc. He practiced his skill at magic before the inmates of scores of institutions and was reputed to know as many tricks as some of the professional masters.

All his performances were given free. He studied his art with James Mulholland, celebrated magician.

Mayer, beginning as a poor boy, amassed millions, but consistently practiced his hobby daily during most of his business life.

His widow. Mrs. Flora Eichberg Mayer, and two sons, survive.


Source: The Evening Star - 5th October 1931

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Apr 22, 2019 1:41 am

JEWELRY MANUFACTURER IN WHIRLWIND ROMANCE -II

Boston, Massachusetts


ROMANCE OF VANDERBILT HOTEL NEWSGIRL IS OVER

Pretty Nan Corrigan, Who Was Wooed and Won by Frank Morton Bates at Her Paper Stand, Now Sues Rich Jewelry Manufacturer for Divorce


Boston, March 20. The once rosy romance of Frank Morton Bates, the "Nat Goodwin of Attleboro" and millionaire Jewelry manufacturer, and his wife, who as Nan Corrigan was wooed, won and wedded when she was working as a newsgirl at the Hotel Vanderbllt, In New York, has been shattered on the rocks of domestic unhappiness. This became known to-day through the filing by Mrs. Nan Corrigan Bates of a divorce suit at Taunton, in which she makes sensational charges.

For the couple, whose courtship and marriage held the Interest of half-a-dozen states, love's sweet dream has lasted less than two years. And when on their honeymoon in Boston both used up Cupid's vocabulary In telling reporters how deeply they loved - now the former newsgirl says she has been disillusioned and accuses Bates of cruelty, of wanton neglect to provide and of gross confirmed habits of intoxication from opium and other drugs.

Mrs Bates came to the Hotel Essex with her husband only a few days after their wedding in Danielson, Conn., on June 5, 1912. There she said: "Money is far from being a thing of scorn and derision and is much to be desired as a matrimonial asset".

Then they moved to Attleboro, where Mrs. Bates soon became a leader in the social set, and was one of the most popular hostesses of the town. Her divorce libel came as a surprise to her friends.

The marriage was Bates's third. His first wife was Miss Mary McDougall, of North Attleboro, who lived with him until 1907, when they were divorced. Bates next married Jessle Campbell Corcoran, of the "When We Were Twenty-One" company, Which was playing in Attleboro. Later they were divorced. The former newsgirl's suit is thus the third of the kind that has come in Bates's career.

Frank M Bates was among the first guests to register at the Hotel Vanderbilt and Miss Corrigan was attending the newsstand. Before she got her job at the Vanderbilt she had been in charge of the newsstand at the Belmont. Bates bought a book of Miss Corrigan, and after that spent a good deal of his time buying all editions of the afternoon papers. The next morning he was downstairs as soon as the newsstand was open, it wasn't long before he had proposed and been accepted, and Miss Corrigan quit her place on June 4. 1912. Then she left town with a girl friend as maid of honor and was married to Bates the following day. At the time of the marriage Miss Corrigan gave her age as twenty-two and Bates said that he was thirty-three.

At the time Bates met Miss Corrigan a widower from Buffalo was paying marked attention to her, but he was older than Bates, and the Buffalo man left the hotel. Before her marriage Miss Corrigan lived with her parents at No. 106 West 96th street, this city.


Source: New York Tribune - 21st March 1914

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Apr 23, 2019 4:36 am

JEWELER AND COINER

Marquette, Kansas


M. J. Muma, a jeweler of Marquette, Kan., was arrested last week by United States Special Agent Burns on the charge of operating a private mint in connection with his store. The officers consider that in Muma they have a dangerous counterfeiter who has been handling and making “queer” money for years When arrested he was in his store in Marquette and was heavily armed. In the basement were found wax casts of coins, metal, coins in an unfinished state and liquid used in check raising. Muma is about 50 years old and has lived in Marquette for a number of years, being a man of some reputation as a jeweler. He was arraigned before United States Commissioner Case in Junction City and lodged in jail in Topeka.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 24th April 1895

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Apr 24, 2019 4:50 am

BENJAMIN FISH CHESTER

Stonington, Connecticut


Benjamin Fish Chester, former well-known jewelry manufacturer and secretary of the Providence Stock Company for twenty-three years before his retirement from active business life eight years ago, died Monday morning at the Home for Aged Men on Broad street, Providence. His death followed an acute attack of heart trouble last Friday evening. He was in his 78th year, and had lived at the home for four years.

Mr. Chester had lived in Providence for 50 years. He was born Sept 5, 1843, in Mystic. In his younger days he taught country school for a few years before going to Providence to become associated with the old Merchant Union Express, which later was taken over by the Adams Express Company.

At the time these two firms combined Mr. Chester retired from the express business and became interested in jewelry manufacturing. He spent a number of years with Louis Katzo, one of the pioneers among jewelry manufacturers in this section. Later he branched out for himself in gold and silver jewelry manufacturing under the firm name of Chester & Manchester. He was secretary for twenty-three years of the Providence Stock Company, up to eight years ago, when he was forced to retire from active business because of failing eye sight.

In 1875 he married Helen M. States of Stonington, who survives him. He also a leaves a son, James S. Chester, a brother, John Chester, both of Providence. The funeral will be held this (Wednesday) morning from the Home for Aged Men. Burial will be In Stonington.


Source: Norwich Bulletin - 21st July 1920

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Apr 25, 2019 5:58 am

JEWELLER SHOOTS BURGLAR

Sutton, Surrey


Mr Foot, a jeweller, of Carshalton-road, Sutton, was awakened at three o'clock on Sunday morning by the noise of some one breaking into his shop. Going round into the street, he saw two men at his front door. He ordered them to hold up their hands, but as they ran away he fired at them with a revolver. The shot missed, and he went in pursuit. One of the men turned and went towards some stables. Mr. Foot fired again, and shot the fugitive in the thigh. Mr. Foot then took up the pursuit of the second man. who ran until he heedlessly approached a police station. The jeweller shouted "Stop thief!" and the sergeant on duty coming out, arrested the offender. The wounded man is in Sutton Hospital.

Source: The Chester Courant - 17th August 1904

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