The West Indian and Caribbean Trade - Information and Advertisements

For information you'd like to share - Post it here - not for questions
dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 44528
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The West Indian Trade - Information and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Fri Oct 16, 2015 1:03 pm

JOSEPH E. BARCANT

17, Frederick Street, Port-of-Spain, Trinidad


Joseph E. Barcant was noted as a 42-year-old Jeweller, located at 17, Frederick Street, Port-of-Spain, Trinidad in 1918.

Source: The Stamp Herald - September 1918

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 44528
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The West Indian Trade - Information and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Fri Nov 27, 2015 10:14 am

CORREIA'S JEWELLERY ESTABLISHMENT Ltd.

British Guiana and Barbados


Diamond Jewellery Project in Barbados

A new industry, known as Correia's Jewellery Establishment Ltd., a branch of a company of similar name in British Guiana, is reported from Bridgetown by Barclays Bank D.C.O. to have been established in Barbados to cut and polish rough diamonds imported from British Guiana and to manufacture jewellery.

Operations started in August and twelve people are employed under the supervision of four technicians from British Guiana. The company expects to supply cut diamonds for the local and export wholesale market.


Source: Jeweller & Metalworker - 1st October 1962

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 44528
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The West Indian Trade - Information and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Thu Apr 28, 2016 9:01 am

How little American jewelry is used in Martinique is seen from a table of imports contained in a report recently sent by Consul Thomas R. Wallace, which shows that out of the $43,218 worth of jewelry received from all countries in 1917, the amount sent from the United States was but $119.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 18th December 1918

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 44528
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The West Indian Trade - Information and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Fri May 06, 2016 1:33 pm

A listing of those involved in the jewellery and allied trades at Kingston, Jamaica in 1915:

Abrahams, Rowland - 25, King Street
Abahams, A.O. - Orange Street
Church, W.D. - Barry Street
Foerster, R. - King Street
Garriques W. - 115, Water Lane
Henriques, Reginald - West Queen Street
Hoffman, E.V. - 118, Harbour Street
Milke, J.H. & Bro. - 8, King Street
Morrison, W. - Harbour Street
Soulette, S.A. - Water Lane
Soulette, J.A. - Church Street
Tobias, Neuman - 42, Harbour Street

Source: Department of Commerce - Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Comerce - Miscellaneous Series Nos. 19-22 - 1915

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 44528
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The West Indian Trade - Information and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Fri May 13, 2016 12:16 pm

JAMES H. MILKE & BROTHER

8, King Street, Kingston, Jamaica


Pittsburg, Pa., June 11. - S.P. Sanders, alias Albert J. Walker, and A.J. White, alias Ralph Waldman, were arrested here last night, and today one of the biggest diamond robberies in years was uncovered.

Sanders was, until recently, the representative in South and Central America of Abraham Bros., wholesale jewellers, of 92, Vyse street, Birmingham, England, while White was a salesman, employed in the jewellery store of James Milke Bros., Kingston, Jamaica. After he had been put through the "third degree" this evening. White broke down and admitted that the two men had stolen diamonds and jewellery valued at $75,000 from Abraham Bros.

According to White's confession, Sanders came to Kingston, Ja., several months ago with a fine collection of precious stones. He and White decided to steal the samples which had been entrusted to Sanders, and bring them to the United States and sell them. After their arrival they sold some of the stuff in Boston, Washington, New York and Philadelphia.

Three days ago they came to Pittsburg and engaged an expensive suite of rooms at the fashionable Hotel Schenley. They then went around the different jewellery stores, represented themselves as wealthy eastern men, caught short for ready money here, and tried to sell some of the jewellery.

At the Hotel Schenley this evening the police took from the lining of a dress suit case, almose $60,000 worth of plunder. It consisted of 79 diamonds, set, six pairs of diamond and ruby pendant earrings, several pairs of single stone earrings, a number of magnificent diamond necklaces, and many chips and many diamond studs and stickpins.

Scotland Yard was notified this afternoon of the arrest by cablegram.


Source: The Montreal Gazette - 12th June 1908


James H. Milke & Bro. were established in 1882.

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 44528
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The West Indian Trade - Information and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Thu Jun 23, 2016 2:07 pm

In a communication to the Bureau of Manufactures regarding the foreign trade of Trinidad, Consul Franklin D. Hale submits a table giving the value of the declared exports from the Port of Spain to the United States during the years 1909 and 1910. According to this table there were no exports of pearls during 1909, but 1910 shows that pearls to the value of $2,502 were exported.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 13th September 1911

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 44528
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The West Indian Trade - Information and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Wed Aug 10, 2016 2:09 pm

Havana Jewelers Claim to be Unable to Pay the New Duty

Havana, Cuba, Aug. 5.—The jewelers and silversmiths of this city at a meeting to-day passed a resolution declaring that it would be impossible for them to pay the high duty imposed by the new tariff. They decided to communicate their reasons to the Minister of the Colonies, to make a pacific but imposing demonstration as a protest against the extra burdens placed on their trade, and to close their establishments if a reduction of the duty was not granted.

They also decided that they would send to the press and the Chamber of Commerce copies of these resolutions in order that their grievances and the difficulties under which they would labor might be made fully known, and that they might obtain support in defense of public interests.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 10th August 1892

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 44528
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The West Indian Trade - Information and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Thu Aug 25, 2016 4:46 am

GEORGE SAMUEL NEWTON

Havana


Death of an American Watchmaker Captured by the Spanish

Washington, D. C., Oct. 8. — The Acting United States Consul General at Havana has informed the State Department that George Samuel Newton, a young American, formerly a watchmaker in Havana, who was wounded and captured by Spanish troops near Baracoa, in Pinar del Rio province, in August last, died in Havana Sept. 30 from the effects of his wounds and fever. Newton’s father lives in Caracas and his mother in Ogden, Utah.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 13th October 1897

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 44528
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The West Indian Trade - Information and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Sun Sep 25, 2016 7:06 am

ANTIGUA

The new tariff of Antigua provides that all samples, not of saleable value, of manufactured and other goods, and all articles intended for exhibition only, and not for sale, which the Treasurer in his discretion, and subject to any rules made as hereinafter mentioned, shall be imported into the presidency free of duty, but any person found disposing of such samples is liable, on conviction, to a fine of not exceeding $500. Jewelry is subject to a duty of $64.78 for every $486 of value, with an allowance of 13.3 per cent, ad valorem for any goods damaged during transit.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 25th May 1904

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 44528
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The West Indian Trade - Information and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Sun Dec 11, 2016 5:33 am

BONNET

Havana


HAVANA

Mr. Bonnet, a jeweller of this city, was stabbed by one of his slaves. He was beating the slave, when the latter stabbed him. The wound is dangerous.


Source: The Morning Freeman - 21st November 1863

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 44528
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The West Indian Trade - Information and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Fri Jan 20, 2017 5:36 am

SAMUEL L. ISRAEL

Obispo Street, Havana


A despatch from Havana dated Dec. 20 stated that Samuel L. Israel, of New York, who had opened a jewelry store in Obispo St., Havana, was arrested by Spanish authorities because he sold American flags. General Greene, the despatch said, effected his release.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 28th December 1898

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 44528
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The West Indian Trade - Information and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Thu May 25, 2017 5:46 am

EDWIN TROOP CHILD

Hamilton, Bermuda


Image
E.T. Child - Hamilton, Bermuda - 1890


Death of Edwin Troop Child

Edwin Troop Child, the largest and most prominent retail jeweler in the Bermudas, died in the city of Hamilton, Bermuda, of apoplexy on Wednesday last. Mr. Child was 55 years old and was a native of New York State. His father. S. J. Child, was a jeweler in Clyde. N.Y.. where Edwin T. Child was born. About 20 years ago Mr. Child left the jewelry business at Clyde and went to Hamilton. Bermuda, where he established himself as a dealer of jewelry and musical instruments. By his ability and industry he built up one of the largest jewelry businesses in the Bermuda islands, which he continued alone throughout his career. Several other jewelers of Bermuda were graduates of his establishment.

Mr. Child was well known in the jewelry trade in New York, and principally by the manufacturers and large jobbers whom he visited nearly every year. He was an old subscriber of 'The Circular' and always gave us a pleasant call when in New York. He was a man of exceptionally genial temperament, was universally liked, and made friends wherever he went. Of late years, after visiting New York, he made a trip to Europe in the early Summer. His downtown headquarters when in New York were with the Wilcox Silver Plate Co. The deceased was a brother of W. W. Child, who has one of the leading jewelry stores of Jackson, Mich., and of Harold E. Child, who succeeded his father, recently deceased, of Clyde, N.Y. The remains were shipped to this country and arrived in New York on the steamer 'Orinoco' Sunday. They were shipped Monday night to Clyde, N.Y., where the interment will take place.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 13th July 1898

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 44528
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The West Indian Trade - Information and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Mon Sep 04, 2017 2:44 pm

MRS. H.G. RECHT

Reid Street, later, Church Street, Hamilton, Bermuda


Image
Mrs. H.G. Recht - Hamilton, Bermuda - 1890

Image
Mrs. H.G. Recht - Hamilton, Bermuda - 1890

Image
Mrs. H.G. Recht - Hamilton, Bermuda - 1901

Image
Mrs. H.G. Recht - Hamilton, Bermuda - 1902

Image
Mrs. H.G. Recht - Hamilton, Bermuda - 1902


Souvenirs—Mrs. H. G. Recht. Tourists in Bermuda, as elsewhere, indulge in souvenir hunting. Front street has a number of stores where all sorts of souvenirs are sold, but the one that took my fancy is located right opposite the Hamilton hotel, on Church street. The proprietor is Mrs. H. G. Recht, a refined German lady, with a captivating manner and most delightful address. The articles she has for sale are dainty, and display taste and delicacy. The goods are reliable, and the prices reasonable. In Mrs. Recht's establishment I saw so many attractive articles that it became a question to which I should give preference. After finishing my purchases I saw lying on one of the show-cases there what seemed to be a fine specimen of the Bermuda onion. I admired it, and Mrs. Recht took it up and said, "If you want it I will give it to you as a gift." She took it up smilingly, and called my attention to its weight, saying, "Don't you think it is a very pretty onion?" I thought it was. She then said, "I hope you will not be insulted. '' I responded to this, somewhat surprised, '' Why should I be?" She seemed greatly pleased, and with a hearty laugh said, "Well, that onion is nothing but a piece of soap.''

I will advise visitors to Bermuda to call on Mrs. Recht. You will enjoy a little talk with this amiable representative of the German Fatherland, whether you decide to select any souvenir or not.


Source: International Railway Journal - November 1902

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 44528
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The West Indian Trade - Information and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Mon Oct 02, 2017 8:25 am

KATES HERMANOS (KATES BROTHERS)

Havana


Image
Oneida Community Ltd. - Oneida, N.Y. - 1920

Image
Oneida Community Ltd. - Oneida, N.Y. - 1925

Image
Oneida Community Ltd. - Oneida, N.Y. - 1926

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 44528
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The West Indian Trade - Information and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Wed Oct 18, 2017 1:34 pm

CUERVO y SOBRINOS

Calle Muralla, later, Teniente Rey, later, San Rafael y Aguila, Havana


Image

Established in 1882 by Ramón Cuervo, who was later joined by his nephew, Armando F. Río y Cuervo, and later by Armando's brothers, Plácido and Lisardo. It is thought the business survived up unto 1965.

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 44528
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The West Indian Trade - Information and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Thu Nov 09, 2017 6:11 am

REPORTS FROM THE CONSULS OF THE UNITED STATES IN ANSWER TO INSTRUCTIONS FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE


At the request of a Massachusetts firm, a Department instruction was sent, under date of January 16, 1902, to the consular officers of the United States, directing them to report in regard to the trade in foreign countries in silverware and plated ware, and especially as to the possible market for articles of American manufacture. Special information was asked as to the consumption of such goods in the respective consular districts; the extent of local manufacture; the importation from foreign countries as well as from the United States; the tariff on silver and plated goods; the obstacles to the extension of American trade in this line, if any existed; the proper methods of packing, etc.

The answers follow:

BRITISH WEST INDIES

BAHAMAS


CONSUMPTION AND IMPORTS

The amount of silver and plated ware consumed in this colony is very small indeed. It is estimated by competent judges that $2,000 in value would cover all that is imported per annum. Nine-tenths of this is of American manufacture and is imported from the United States. It is mostly of a cheap grade.


MANUFACTURE AND TARIFF

There is no local manufacturing. The tariff is 20 per cent ad valorem.


OUTLOOK FOR AMERICAN WARE

The inability of the people to indulge in such luxuries is the principal obstacle in the way of an extension of trade in this line, and until that is overcome no particular increase is to be expected.

The quality, style, and prices of our goods are very satisfactory, and give us an advantage which controls the trade at present and which will continue to do so.

THOS. J. McLAIN, Consul
NASSAU, February 1902


Source: Special Consular Reports - Silver and Plated Ware in Foreign Countries - Bureau of Foreign Commerce, Department of State - 1902

Trev.

paulh
contributor
Posts: 424
Joined: Wed Nov 29, 2006 6:02 pm
Location: Cheshire, England

Re: Official Hallmarking in Jamaica--1747

Postby paulh » Sun Mar 11, 2018 8:04 am

dognose wrote:GEORGE SAMUEL RANKIN

The mark attributed to George Samuel Rankin who was working in Bermuda c.1820:

Image

Image

Trev.


This is that same mark on a pair of fiddle sugar tongs. They are of a substantial pair gauge, weighing 48 grams and measuring 155mm in length, with a concave fiddle construction, rather than a flat profile. They have a tenuous attribution of once belonging to a family who lived in Bermuda.

Paulh.

Image
Image

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 44528
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The West Indian Trade - Information and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Mon Mar 19, 2018 2:54 pm

A Listing of Jewellers working in Port-au-Prince, Haiti:


F.W.S. Obermeyer is the only recorded jeweller working in Port-au-Prince in 1897.

Source: Commercial Directory of the American Republics - 1897

Four are recorded in 1901:

Audain, Louis
Massa
Obermeyer, F.W.S
Serre, Ve Gaston


Source: Official Commercial Directory of Cuba, Porto Rico and the Entire West Indies with Bermuda for 1901

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 44528
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The West Indian Trade - Information and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Tue Jul 24, 2018 3:11 am

W. JOHNSON

Barbados


W. Johnston, Barbadoes, W. I., is in Toronto with the object of opening up connections with the wholesale trade to obtain a supply of goods, which he is unable to procure in the English markets owing to the scarcity of material.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 6th August 1919

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 44528
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The West Indian and Caribbean Trade - Information and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Sun Nov 25, 2018 3:30 pm

THE SOUVENIR COINS OF THE REPUBLIC OF CUBA

Providence, R.I., July 15. - The special "Patria Libertad" souvenir coins which the Republic of Cuba has ordered to be made by the Gorham Mfg. Co., are nearly completed. The souvenir has been issued by the new republic through its accredited delegation to raise funds to carry on what it is expected will be the last campaign next winter. These souvenirs weigh 348 grains, the same as the four shillings piece, and are 9.10 fine silver. They will sell for $1 plus express charges. In the event of the successful termination of the war, they will be redeemed for $1. These souvenir were designed by Philip Martigny, the eminent sculptor.

Agents from Cuba have been in consultation with members of the Gorham Mfg. Co. at various times for some weeks, and two new machines were put in in order that the work might be completed in the required time. The idea ought to meet with a ready response in this country, for it is one of reciprocity and as much is given by the republic as it is received.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 21st July 1897

Trev.


Return to “Contributors' Notes”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 29 guests