HAYNE, Jonathan (Grimwade p.541, 751)

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MCB
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HAYNE, Jonathan (Grimwade p.541, 751)

Postby MCB » Wed Aug 14, 2013 4:29 am

He was christened in 1782 at St James, Clerkenwell, the son of Jonathan and Catherine.
No record of his marriage to Sarah Dinah has been traced.
Their two children were christened at churches in Clerkenwell in 1812 and 1815.
The burial of his wife Sarah Dinah aged 25 years, late of Holloway, was registered at St Mary, Islington in 1816.
He married Mary Ward in 1821 at St Pancras parish church; he was from St John’s parish, Clerkenwell.
A son was christened at St James, Clerkenwell in 1823 when their address was Middleton Terrace.
Their three daughters were christened at All Saints, Camden between 1825 and 1830 when their address was Camden Street.
George Pritchard of London in 1809, William James Lampright of London in 1810, Robert Arnold Hucks of Bermondsey in 1811, William Henry Morris of London in 1825, Charles Thomas Parson of Devon and Henry George Wiggins of London both in 1831 and Edward Stokes of Camden in 1832 all signed to be his apprentices.
His sons Samuel Holditch Thomas (born 1814) and Watson Ward (born 1822) were made free by patrimony in 1835 and 1843 respectively.
He was recorded in the 1841 UK Census aged 59 years of independent means living with his wife Ann and his family at Park Hill House, Park Lane, Croydon.
His burial in 1848 aged 65 years, late of Christ Church district, was registered at St John, Clerkenwell.
The Will of Jonathan Hayne, silversmith late of Park Hill, Croydon, was proved for probate on 24th June 1848 (National Archives reference PROB 11/2076/261).

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Re: HAYNE, Jonathan (Grimwade p.541, 751)

Postby dognose » Thu Jun 26, 2014 1:06 pm

Jonathan Hayne's 1833 Patent for the manufacture of flatware:

STAMPING OF METALS The following-ingenious machine for manufacturing metal spoons, forks, and other articles, was made the subject of a patent by Jonathan Hayne, of Clerkenwell, in May, 1833. He employs a stamping-machine with dies, in which the hammer is raised lo a height between guides, and is let fall by a trigger. He prefers fixing the protuberant or relief portion of the die to the stationary block or bed of the stamping-machine, and the counterpart or intaglio to the falling hammer or ram.

The peculiar feature of improvement in this manufacture consists in producing the spoon, ladle, or fork perfect at one blow in the stamping-machine, and requiring no further manipulation of shaping, but simply trimming off the barb or fin, and polishing the surface, to render the article perfect and finished.

Heretofore, in employing a stamping-machine, or fly-press, for manufacturing spoons, ladles, and forks, it has been the practice to give the impressions to the handles, and to the bowls or prongs, by distinct operations of different dies, and after having so partially produced the pattern upon the article, the handles had to be bent and formed by the operations of filing and hammering.

By his improved form of dies, which, having curved surfaces and bevelled edses, allow of no parts of the faces of the die and counter-die to come into contact, he is enabled to produce considerable elevations of pattern and form, and to bring up the article perfect at one blow, with only a slight barb or fin upon its edge.

In the accompanying drawings, fig. 1344 is the lower or bed die for producing a spoon, seen edgewise; fig. 1345 is the face of the upper or counter-die, corresponding;

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fig, 1346. is a section, taken through the middle of the pair of dies, showing the space in which the metal is pressed to form the spoon.

To manufacture spoons, ladles, or forks according to his improved process, he first forges out the ingot into flat pieces, of the shape and dimension of the die of the intended article ; and if a spoon or ladle is to be made, gives a slight degree of concavity to the bowl part ; but, if necessary, bends the back, in order that it may lie more steadily and bend more accurately, upon the lower die; if a fork, he cuts or otherwise removes portions of the metal at those parts which will intervene between the prongs; and, having thus produced the rude embryo of the intended article, scrapes its entire surface clean and free from oxidation-scale or fire-strain, when it is ready to be introduced into the stamping-machine.

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He now fixes the lower die in the bed of the stamping-machine, shown at a, a, in the elevations figs. 1347. and 1348., and fixes, in the hammer b, the upper or counter-die c, accurately adjusting them both, so that they may correspond exactly when brought together. He then places the rudely-formed article above described upon the lower die, and having drawn up the 1347 hammer to a sufficient elevation by a windlass and rope, or other ordinary means, lets go the trigger, and allows the hammer with the counter-die to fall upon the under die, on which the article is placed; when, by the blow thus given to the metal, the true and perfect figure and pattern of the spoon, ladle, or fork is produced, and which, as before said, will only require the removal of the slight edging of barb or fin, with polishing, to finish it.

On striking the blow, in the operation of stamping the article, the hammer will recoil and fly up some distance, and if allowed to fall again with reiterated blows, would injure both the article and the dies; therefore, to avoid this inconvenience, he causes the hammer on recoiling to be caught by a pair of palls locking into racks on the face of the standards, seen 1348. In fig. 1347 the hammer b. of the stamping-machine, is seen raised and suspended by a rope attached to a pair of jointed hooks or holders d, d, the lower ends of which pass into eyes e, e, extending from the top of the hammer. When the lever or trigger t is drawn forward, as in fig. 1046, the two inclined planes g, g, on the axle h, press the two legs of the holders d, d, inward, and cause their hooks or lower ends to be withdrawn from the eyes e, e, when the hammer instantly falls, and brings the dies together : such is the ordinary construction of the stamping-machine.

On the hammer falling from a considerable elevation, the violence of the blow causes it to recoil and bound upwards, as before mentioned; it therefore becomes necessary to catch the hammer when it has rebounded, in order to prevent the dies coming again together ; this is done by the following mechanism :–

Two latch levers i,.i, are connected by joints to the upper part of the hammer, and two pall levers k, k, turning upon pins, are mounted in the bridge l, affixed to the hammer. Two springs m, m, act against the lower arms of these levers, and press them outwards, for the purpose of throwing the palls at the lower ends of the levers into the teeth of the ratchet racks n, n, fixed on the sides of the upright standards.

Previously to raising the hammer, the upper ends of the pall levers k, are drawn back, and the latches i, being brought down upon them, as in fig. 1345, the levers k are confined, and their palls prevented from striking into the side racks; but as the hammer falls, the ends of the latches i strike upon the fingers о, о, fixed to the side standards, and liberate the palls, the lower ends of which, when the hammer rebounds, after stamping, catch into the teeth of the racks, as in fig. 1046, and thereby prevent the hammer from again descending.


Source: A Dictionary of Arts, Manufactures, and Mines - By Andrew Ure - 1858

silverly
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Re: HAYNE, Jonathan (Grimwade p.541, 751)

Postby silverly » Thu Jun 26, 2014 3:52 pm

22 March 1810 Jonathan Hayne of the Parish of Saint James Clerkenwell in the County of Middlesex a batchelor aged twenty-seven years and upward made an oath that he intended to marry Sarah Dinah Wiggins of the Parish of Danbury in the County of Essex a minor aged eighteen years and upward but under the age of tweny-one years with the consent of her mother Elizabeth the widow of John Wiggins.

dognose
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Re: HAYNE, Jonathan (Grimwade p.541, 751)

Postby dognose » Sun Mar 29, 2015 12:53 pm

Recorded as Wallis and Hayne, Wholesale Silversmiths of 16, Red Lion Street, Clerkenwell.

Source: Johnstone's London Commercial Guide - Corrected to 31st August 1817 - Andrew Johnstone - 1818

dognose
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Re: HAYNE, Jonathan (Grimwade p.541, 751)

Postby dognose » Sat Feb 08, 2020 2:31 pm

An example of the work and mark (Grimwade No.1408) of Jonathan Hayne:

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I·H - London - 1831

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I·H - London - 1831

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I·H - London - 1831


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