DB on a Bright Cut Table Spoon

PHOTOS REQUIRED - marks + item
paulh
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DB on a Bright Cut Table Spoon

Postby paulh » Sat Jan 01, 2022 1:00 pm

This is an ordinary bright cut table spoon, but all of my searches cannot trace the maker. It is “DB” struck twice, with a crossed downstroke on the “D” Any ideas anyone?

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Aguest
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Re: DB on a Bright Cut Table Spoon

Postby Aguest » Mon Jan 03, 2022 9:51 am

Is it an "LB" or a "DB" because there are possibilities from Cape Town:


"Most probably the son of Lodewyck Christiaan Willem Beck and Woutrina Catharina de Vos. Known activity as jeveller or goldsmith/jeweller from 1847 to 1867 Cape Colony 1850 c. hallmark"

or

"DB
The illegitimate son of Balthus Wilhelm Beets of Neubrandenburg and Angana of the Cape. Married Anna Maria Petronella Bedeker in 1794. Documented activity as silversmith from 1812 to 1828
Cape Colony 1820 c. hallmark"

You would be better able to compare the spoon with these Cape Town hallmarks, I can't make a definitive conclusion because the hallmark is worn on your spoon or maybe the punch is just worn down so the details aren't as crisp ::::

Also if you have a pic of the part where the underneath of the bowl meets the underneath of the shaft it might be possible to better date the spoon. ::::
It seems like 1812-1828 (working dates for DB of Cape Town) matches the form of the spoon but the spoon could be earlier and the construction of the "drop" of the spoon might help to better put a date on the spoon. :::

paulh
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Location: Cheshire, England

Re: DB on a Bright Cut Table Spoon

Postby paulh » Mon Jan 03, 2022 12:39 pm

Hello Aguest,

Thank you for your response. I did consider Daniel Beets, but the “D” on this spoon is very distinctive and does not match any examples of his punch which I have seen. He was also working rather later than the style of spoon would suggest. Although style in colonial silver cannot really be dated along the lines of English fashion.

The punch is definitely worn, as can be seen by the distortion recurring at the top of the initials on both strikes. It is possible therefor that the examples in Stephan Welz’s book are of later replacement punches.

The joint on the back of the spoon is a simple union joint, so no real clues there. I have looked at all manner of colonial silver; Cape, Australian, Indian, Canadian etc, also British and Irish provincial, but have not yet found an exact match. I might just have to put it in the “unsolved mysteries” file until something materialises.

Paul.

Aguest
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Re: DB on a Bright Cut Table Spoon

Postby Aguest » Mon Jan 03, 2022 2:21 pm

Yes I agree. ::: The upright stroke of the "D" looks more like a few Channel Islands Silversmiths because of that little wiggle in the middle of the upright stroke. ::: That's why at first I thought it was Channel Islands related. ::: In a private collection I have seen a triple-stamped symbol that looked like a British Pound symbol like a stylized "L" with a little wiggle in the middle of the letter, and I assumed that spoon to be a duty-dodger, so maybe this is just a duty-dodger who is imitating a provincial hallmark just close enough such that he won't get in trouble :::: Deceiving all of us after 200+ years. ::::

paulh
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Location: Cheshire, England

Re: DB on a Bright Cut Table Spoon

Postby paulh » Mon Jan 03, 2022 5:18 pm

I know what you mean about the Channel Islands. I do have a C. I. spoon with that crossed L. A duty dodger is a possibility.


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