The Continental Silver Co. and The Continental Silver Co. and the......

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The Continental Silver Co. and The Continental Silver Co. and the......

Postby dognose » Thu Aug 13, 2015 5:53 pm

For the last couple of years I've been attributing various sets of marks to the Continental Silver Co. of Brooklyn, but now a seed of doubt has crept into my head and some further research reveals the possibility that there were two perhaps separate businesses that operated the same name, indeed three if you include the Continental Sheffield Silver Co. that was connected to the Continental Silver Co. of Brooklyn.

In this topic all information to hand can be added and hopefully a conclusion can finally be reached as to correct attribution of the marks.

Trev.

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Re: The Continental Silver Co. and The Continental Silver Co.

Postby dognose » Fri Aug 14, 2015 8:44 am

Image
Continental Sheffield Silver Co. - Brooklyn, N.Y. - 1920

Image
Continental Sheffield Silver Co. - Brooklyn, N.Y. - 1922

According to Rainwater, the Continental Silver Co. of Brooklyn was the sales outlet of the Continental Sheffield Silver Co. of New York, and were thought to be in business from c.1920 to 1950.

Their marks can clearly be seen in the above advertisements.

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Re: The Continental Silver Co. and The Continental Silver Co.

Postby dognose » Fri Aug 14, 2015 12:54 pm

However, there was definitely an earlier Continental Silver Company, located at Scottdale, Pennsylvania:


CONTINENTAL SILVER COMPANY—Scottdale, July 26. 1906. Capital, $35,000. Manufacturing and selling hardware and metallic castings.

Source: List of Charters of Corporations Enrolled in the Office of the Secretary of the Commonwealth - 1907


The business of the Grilley Co., of State Street, New Haven, Conn., has been divided and the casket hardware department has been taken over by a new company called the Continental Silver Co. This company is situated at Scottdale, Pa. A. H. Kelley is president, B. F. Overholt is vice-president, and F. R. Bailey is the secretary and treasurer. A full line of coffin hardware will be manufactured and a good mold maker is desired. The Grilley Co. will still continue to manufacture brass goods.

Source: The Brass World and Platers Guide - July 1905


THE CONTINENTAL SILVER COMPANY, Scottdale, Pa., has succeeded to the Casket Hardware business formerly carried on by the Grilley Company of New Haven, Conn. The Continental Company will make a full line of Hardware for the undertaking trade. Its officers are Albert H. Kelley, president; B. F. Overholt, vice-president, and F. R. Bailey, secretary and treasurer.

Source: The Iron Age - 10th August 1905


Scottdale, Pa.—The Continental Silver Co. has been incorporated for the manufacture of hardware and metallic castings. Directors, H. F. Overholt, F. R. Bailey H. C. Rich. A. C. Overholt, Clyde Overholt, Scottdale; Albert H. Kelley, Allegheny.

Source: Hardware - 25th August 1905


MOLD MAKER WANTED by the Continental Silver Company, Scottdale, Pa.

Source: The Metal Industry - September 1905


The Worcester Metal Goods Co., 17 Hermon St., Worcester, Mass., have purchased the plant and business of the Grilley Co., of New Haven. Conn., and will move the business to Worcester. Buckles and sheet metal novelties have been manufactured by the Grilley Co.

Source: The Brass World and Platers Guide - November 1906


The Standard Casket Hardware Co. has been organized at Tionesta, Pa., and are now in operation. Casket handles from sheet steel are manufactured. Heretofore these have always been made of antimonial lead. A steel handle, of course, is much stronger. The handles are silver plated in the usual manner. Albert H. Kelley, of the Continental Silver, Co., Scottdale, Pa., is connected with the new company.

Source: The Brass World and Platers Guide - October 1907


Compound Electroplating with Silver and Nickel. (U.S. Pat. 850,944. Metallurgie, 4. pp. 570-571, Aug. 22, 1907. Abstract.)—R. H. Marshall deposits Ag and Ni simultaneously from compound solutions of nickel cyanide (from precipitating sulphate with cyanide of potassium) and silver chloride or silver cyanide; 11 oz. of each of these salts are dissolved in 1 gallon of water. Temperature, current strength, and voltage are not stated; the anodes are silver plates. The Continental Silver Co., of Scottdale, has worked the process for some time, and the plated articles are said closely to resemble silver-plated goods. The deposition is much quicker than with pure silver.

Source: Science Abstracts: Electrical engineering abstracts - Institution of Electrical Engineers - 1907


Die Continental Silver Co., Scottdale, Pennsylvania verkauft nach Metallurgie versilberte Artikel, die in Wirklichkeit mit Nickel and Silber Uberzogen sind. Nach Marshalls Patent löst man eine Mischung von Nickelcyanid und Chlorsilber (oder Silbercyanid), und zwar 42,5 g dieser Salze in 3,785 kg Wasser; als Anoden dienen Silberplatten. Angaben über Spannung, Strom, Temperatur fehlen. Die Fällung geht schneller wie bei reinem Silber, und die Sachen sollen sich besser halten.

Source: Fortschritte der Elektrotechnik: Vierteljärliche Berichte über die neueren Erscheinungen auf dem Gesamtgebiete der angewandten Elekricitätslehre mit Einschluss des elektrischen Nachtrichten- und Signalwesens - Julius Springer - 1908


The entire plant of the Continental Silver Company, manufacturers of casket hardware, Scottdale, Pa., including real estate, plant, tools, machinery, and supplies have been sold to A.C. Overholt of Scottdale, and will he hereafter known as the Continental Casket Hardware Company. E.F. Doorley, General Manager; Charles Coughenour, Foreman; and Robert E. Collins, Foreman Plater, have all been retained by the new concern.

Source: The Metal Industry - February 1911

Trev.

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Re: The Continental Silver Co. and The Continental Silver Co.

Postby dognose » Fri Aug 14, 2015 1:23 pm

In case you are wondering where all this is heading, I've no idea, just learning, recording, and sharing as I go along.

Trev.

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Re: The Continental Silver Co. and The Continental Silver Co.

Postby dognose » Fri Aug 14, 2015 1:32 pm

Patented designs by the Continental Sheffield Silver Co. of Brooklyn, filed on the 27th February 1920:

Image

Note, these designs were filed by the Continental Sheffield Silver Co., not the Continental Silver Co.

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Re: The Continental Silver Co. and The Continental Silver Co.

Postby dognose » Fri Aug 14, 2015 2:30 pm

Back to Scottdale:

J. F. Hubbs. formerly with the Continental Silver Co. of Scottdale. Pa., has assumed charge of the plating and polishing departments of the Bowmanville Foundry Co. of Bowmanville, Canada.

Source: The Brass World and Platers Guide - July 1907


J. F. Hubbs, formerly with the Continental Silver Company, of Scottdale, Pa., has accepted a position to take charge of the polishing and plating departments of the Bowmanville Foundry Company, of Bowmanville, Ontario, Canada.

Source: The Metal Industry - July 1907

Trev.

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Re: The Continental Silver Co. and The Continental Silver Co.

Postby dognose » Fri Aug 14, 2015 2:48 pm

Back to Brooklyn:

Two more designs, this time filed under the name of Victor Gaertner (partner in the Continental Sheffield Silver Co.) and filed on the 21st July 1921:

Image

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Re: The Continental Silver Co. and The Continental Silver Co.

Postby dognose » Fri Aug 14, 2015 2:53 pm

Aaron W. Warshavsky and Jacob Cohen were noted as co-partners in Warshavsky & Cohen in 1909.

Source: Polk's New York Copartnership and Corporation Directory - 1909


Victor Gaertner was noted as a director and secretary of the Traders Metal Goods Co. Inc. of New York in 1915.

Source: Polk's New York Copartnership and Corporation Directory - 1915


Aaron W. Warshavsky and Victor Gaertner were noted as co-partners in the Continental Sheffield Silver Co. in 1919.

Source: Polk's New York Copartnership and Corporation Directory - 1919

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Re: The Continental Silver Co. and The Continental Silver Co.

Postby dognose » Fri Aug 14, 2015 3:14 pm

DEATH OF A. W. WARSHAVSKY

Senior Member of Continental Sheffield Silver Co., Brooklyn, and Inventor, Passes Away Suddenly

Aaron W. Warshavsky, senior member of the Continental Sheffield Silver Co., 187 Broadway, Brooklyn, N. Y., and an inventor, died suddenly on Tuesday, March 8. at his home 134 S. 9th St. The funeral services were held last Wednesday afternoon at which Rabbi Dr. Morias of the Portugese Synagogue officiated, after which the body was interred in Baron De Hirsch Cemetery, Staten Island, N. Y.

Aaron W. Warshavsky was born in Russia 47 years ago, and at the age of 16 years came to this country. While living in Russia, Mr. Warshavsky developed some of his natural mechanical ability and after reaching this country, engaged in the antique brass business and in later years became one of the leaders in this industry.

Some years ago, he started in the antique brass business on his own account in Brooklyn and while in this business, invented a number of mechanical devices including an aeroplane. About five years ago, he turned his brass factory into a shop capable of manufacturing silverware and a year later was joined by M (sic). Gaertner after which the business became known as the Continental Sheffield Silver Co. He was engaged in the silver business when he perfected an invention to utilize the power of ocean waves and convert it into electricity.

Mr. Warshavsky was not only a mechanical genius but was also an unusually bright business man. He had a charming disposition and was loved by everyone who knew him.

As a mark of respect every employee at the concern's factory attended the funeral services last Wednesday afternoon. He was a member of the Brooklyn Federation of Jewish Charities of the Zionist organization of America.

He is survived by a widow and one sister.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 16th March 1921



AARON W. WARSHAVSKY

Aaron W Warshavsky, a manufacturer of silver-plated ware and part owner of the Continental Sheffield Silver Company in Brooklyn, died from heart disease on Tuesday at his home, 134 South Ninth street, Brooklyn. Mr. Warshavsky was born in Russia forty-seven years ago. He was a member of the Brooklyn Federation of Jewish Charities and the Zionist Organization of America.


Source: The Metal Industry - April 1921

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Re: The Continental Silver Co. and The Continental Silver Co.

Postby dognose » Fri Aug 14, 2015 3:56 pm

Note of perhaps yet another Continental Silver Co., recorded at Room 1610, Flatiron Building, Manhattan, New York. The manager noted as George W. Keebler, two other employees noted as August C. Keebler and a Miss McKenzie.

Source: Regulating Collection of Money - United States Congress. Senate. Committee on Military Affairs - 1919

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Re: The Continental Silver Co. and The Continental Silver Co.

Postby dognose » Sat Aug 15, 2015 10:16 am

An advertisement for the Grilley Company, part of which was acquired by the Continental Silver Company of Scottdale in 1905:

Image
The Grilley Company - New Haven, Conn. - 1899

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Re: The Continental Silver Co. and The Continental Silver Co. and the......

Postby dognose » Sun Aug 16, 2015 7:49 am

Yet another company with a similar name rear's its head:

The Continental Silver Plating Works, noted as being located at East Haddam, Connecticut. In business and recorded in local directories during the years 1883 and 1884.

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Re: The Continental Silver Co. and The Continental Silver Co. and the......

Postby dognose » Wed Aug 19, 2015 12:46 pm

A 1922 advertisement from the Continental Silver Co. that describes themselves as manufacturers of Sheffield hollow ware but that clearly mentions Sales and Showrooms. It would appear to me that rather than the Continental Silver Co. being the sales outlet for the Continental Sheffield Silver Co., that there has merely been a restyling of their name.

Image
Continental Silver Co. - Brooklyn - 1922

The advertisement mentions that the showrooms located at 341-347 Fifth Avenue are under the charge of W.C. Newland, who was formerly with George Borgfeldt & Co..

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Re: The Continental Silver Co. and The Continental Silver Co. and the......

Postby dognose » Sat Aug 22, 2015 7:47 am

An interesting snippet of information from 1924, that suggests an interruption in the business of The Continental Silver Co. The business now appears to be in the hands of W.C. Newland and A.E. Warshavsky (son of Aaron W. Warshavsky?).

The Continental Silver Corporation, New York, Incorporated with $100,000 capital stock to manufacture metal plated wares, is developing organization matters and has no definite plans under way as yet for manufacturing. W. C. Newland and A.E. Warshavsky are the incorporators. Address in care of A.P. Bersohn, 25, West Forty-Third Street.

Source: The Iron Age - 1924

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Re: The Continental Silver Co. and The Continental Silver Co. and the......

Postby dognose » Sun Aug 23, 2015 8:13 am

It was announced recently that W. Clifford Newland, for some time head of the domestic china and glass department of Geo. Borgfeldt & Co., 119 E. 16th St., has tendered his resignation to take effect on Jan. 1. After severing connections with the Borgfeldt concern, Mr. Newland will become associated with the Continental Sheffield Silver Co., of Brooklyn and will occupy the position of sales manager. He will establish show rooms in this city.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 23rd November 1921

W.C. Newland was connected with George Borgfeldt & Co. for ten years, seven of which were spent as the manager and buyer of the firm's china and glass department, a position in which he was replaced by Paul Schneelock.

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Re: The Continental Silver Co. and The Continental Silver Co. and the......

Postby dognose » Wed Aug 26, 2015 11:22 am

Changes in Firm of Warshavsky & Cohen

A. W. Warshavsky, senior partner of the firm of Warshavsky & Cohen, the well known brass goods manufacturers, has bought out his partner, Jacob Cohen, and will henceforth continue the business under the old name under his personal management, with Philip Lasker in charge of the sales end of the business. As Mr. Warshavsky is the founder of the business and has always been the practical man therein, having entire charge of the manufacturing end, and as Mr. Lasker has had charge of the sales end for some time past, the change will make no difference in the conduct of the business. The New York offices of the concern have been moved from the Flatiron Building to Suite 515, No. 41 Union Square. and are in charge of Clarence McMurray, who is well known to the trade.


Source: The Pottery & Glass Salesman - 18th February 1915

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Re: The Continental Silver Co. and The Continental Silver Co. and the......

Postby dognose » Thu Aug 27, 2015 7:43 am

The American Association of Opticians Convention

Atlanta, Georgia


Image

J. H. Lewis, southern representative for Warshavsky & Cohen. New York; the Irving Cut Glass Co., Honesdale. Pa., and the Tower Mfg. and Novelty Co.. New York, took personal charge of an exhibit of porcelain ware, cut glass and hammered copper goods that was unique and handsome, and attracted much attention.

Source: The Optical Review - July 1909

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Re: The Continental Silver Co. and The Continental Silver Co. and the......

Postby dognose » Fri Aug 28, 2015 7:11 am

S. Sipser has taken the agency for the Metropolitan District for the Warshavsky & Cohen, Brooklyn, line of portables, domes, semi-indirect fixtures and casseroles, and is now showing the season's new samples at his showrooms.

Source: Crockery and Glass Journal - 5th March 1914

S. Sipser was noted as the New York manager of the Crown Novelty Co. in 1913.

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Re: The Continental Silver Co. and The Continental Silver Co. and the......

Postby dognose » Sat Aug 29, 2015 6:29 am

A tiny, but interesting, advertisement from Warshavsky & Cohen that gives their address as the Flatiron Building and shows that they were at this time making silver-plated wares and using the trade name 'Beautility Ware'.

Image
Warshavsky & Cohen - New York - 1915

Warshavsky & Cohen
"Beautility Ware", Brass and Silver Plated
Ware, Casseroles, Lamps. Flatiron Bldg.


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Re: The Continental Silver Co. and The Continental Silver Co. and the......

Postby dognose » Mon Aug 31, 2015 12:32 pm

The Continental Sheffield Silver Co. becomes The Continental Silver Co.

Why the name change? This was probably due to the attitude of the trade at time over the use of the word 'Sheffield', when it had little or no connection with product being offered.

The below article from a trade journal sums up the feeling at the time:

The Sale of So-Called Sheffield Ware

A word of caution should again be given to retail jewelers in regard to the sale of so-called Sheffield ware or imitation of the old Sheffield plate, as complaints which have been received by 'The Jewelers' Circular' and business bureaus in the past month or so indicate that some jewelers are none too careful in the sale of such articles under the name of "Sheffield," that is, at least, their clerks are not sufficiently explicit with customers to keep the latter from believing that they are buying some special metal that differs from silver plate and ranks next to silverware.

As we have often noted in the past, complaints of this kind have often been made against department stores and dealers in other lines whose ignorant clerks have sold Sheffield pieces to the public under representations that it was a special ware, that it was not silver plated ware but was far superior to the latter. That jewelers would stoop to such misrepresentation, we did not believe and do not believe that the trade as a class will at all consider for a minute the sale of silver plated ware under the name of ''Sheffield" as if it were something different from the ordinary plated ware. We are glad to state that even in the complaints that we have heard about in the trade, the sale was made by clerks who apparently did not understand what they were selling but this does not relieve the proprietors of the responsibility of the sales, for they should have instructed their clerks what they were selling and under no circumstances permitted the articles to be sold for anything except what they were, silver plated ware.

As a matter of fact, the whole atmosphere surrounding the sale of these so-called "Sheffield" lines has been redolent of misrepresentation or at least of misunderstanding on the part of the buyer. The very name stamped on these articles is to a large extent unrepresentative of their character. None or practically none have ever seen the City of Sheffield and have no excuse for the name they bear. Some, but by no means all, are reproductions of the patterns used in the real Sheffield plate and none so far as we have been able to ascertain are made by the process that the old Sheffield plate manufacturers used and are, therefore, devoid of the essentia! characteristics that cause the demand for Sheffield plate in the olden days.

As the trade well knows the manufacture of Sheffield plate started in 1742 as an invention of Thomas Bolsover, who succeeded in producing an imitation of silver by beating out a thin layer of silver and placing it on a copper foundation and then fusing the two metals together by the action of heat. This process, which was developed by Bolsover's apprentice, Joseph Hancock, and others, resulted in the production of articles of great wearing quality and artistic merit that are in demand by collectors today. But it practically died out since the introduction of the electroplating process, and for about 70 years, Sheffield plate has been growing in demand as a curiosity and antiquity as well as for the wearing qualities and artistic properties it possessed.

Sheffield plate, therefore, is known all over the world to collectors as something with an artistic meaning, an article produced by the old Bolsover process made in the City of Sheffield, England. Reproductions of Sheffield plate made in the old way or reproductions of patterns of the old Sheffield plate made in a different way may have their place in the merchandise world today but they only have a place as "reproductions," and to sell such articles of Sheffield or Sheffield plate is a misrepresentation of which no jeweler should be guilty. As a matter of fact, much of the so-called Sheffield plate coming to the trade today does not even reproduce the old patterns, lots of which is plated ware of the cheapest kind and cheapest character and for a jeweler to sell such articles as Sheffield plate is more than a misrepresentation, it is a fraud.

As every progressive merchant in our industry understands, the only way the jewelry trade can develop, the only way it can establish its hold upon the people of the country is by having its members obtain and maintain the confidence of their customers in the articles which they sell. For this reason, we have continually cautioned the jewelers to forbid their clerks from selling articles under any ambiguous names or trade terms not understood by the public at large. No more ambiguous or misrepresentative term has ever been used in any line than the word, "Sheffield," as applied to some of the cheap plated ware now being sold by the trade and it is up to our legitimate merchants, for the sake of the reputation of the industry at large, to see that its members neither actively or passively consent to the misuse of this name for the sale of cheap silver plated ware.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 13th July 1921

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