Information Regarding Krementz & Co.

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Information Regarding Krementz & Co.

Postby dognose » Thu May 28, 2015 6:42 am

Information Regarding Krementz & Co.


A topic for recording information regarding Krementz & Co. of Newark, New Jersey.

If you have any details of the above company, advertisements, examples of their work, etc., anything that you are willing to share, then here's the place to post it.

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Re: Information Regarding Krementz & Co.

Postby dognose » Thu May 28, 2015 7:05 am

Collar Buttons and Rolled Gold Specialties


THE manufacturing Jewelry house of Krementz & Co., of Newark, New Jersey, U. S. A., are the Inventors and makers of the well-known collar button and other rolled gold plate specialties bearing their name. This company are fully awake to the possibilities of the export field and report that their foreign selling campaign is producing satisfactory results.

In addition to their resident foreign agents at different points, this firm is building a permanent organization of traveling salesmen for the overseas fields. The pioneer of this corps is Mr. Luis Quintana, a gentleman peculiarly fitted for the career of a cosmopolitan salesman. Mr. Quintana has recently returned from a successful trip through South America and is now in the Orient in the interests of the Krementz concern.

The collar button produced by this company is known throughout the world, and its universal popularity is evidenced by the orders received from such places as Punta Arenas, Abyssinia, Zanzibar, Portuguese East Africa, South American points located 1,500 miles up the Amazon River, from Thibet; in fact, this collar button and other rolled gold productions bearing the Krementz name are sold to buyers everywhere, Including some of the most inaccessible trade centers in the world. The company state, further, that they are one of the largest manufacturers of diamond mounted platinum and solid gold Jewelry to be found anywhere.

To jewelry buyers abroad it will be of Interest to know something of Mr. Quintana's proposed itinerary. This gentleman carries a complete line of Krementz rolled gold specialties, together with a small range of solid gold Jewelry adapted for women's use.

After leaving Japan and traveling along the Chinese coast, Mr. Quintana's trip is outlined as follows: Hong kong, February 28 to March 3; Singapore, March 17 to 26; Batavia, March 28 to April 12; Singapore, April 14; Rangoon. April 21 to 25 ; Calcutta, April 20 to May 8; Madras, May 10 to 14; Bombay, May 16 to 26 ; Karachi, May 30 to June 4, and Cairo, June 10 to 17.

These dates are contingent upon steamer sailings, and it is suggested that interested merchants communicate with the American Consuls at these points, in advance, In order that they may be Informed of the exact dates upon which Mr. Quintana may be expected to visit their localities.

Subsequent to the Far East trip, the Krementz representative will visit Italy, Spain, Portugal, France, Belgium, the Scandinavian countries and Great Britain, on his way back to the United States.

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The Krementz line of collar and cuff buttons are widely known. These products are made in many designs and high-grade workmanship and have won recognition in jewelry centers throughout the world. This company are fully awake to the possibilities of the export field and report that their foreign selling campaign is producing satisfactory results.


Source: Dun's International Review - April 1919

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Re: Information Regarding Krementz & Co.

Postby dognose » Fri May 29, 2015 7:04 am

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Krementz & Co. - Newark, N.J. - 1908

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Re: Information Regarding Krementz & Co.

Postby dognose » Sat May 30, 2015 9:30 am

One of the largest and best known of the jewelry manufacturing concerns during the past half century since the American Horological Journal was established is that of Krementz & Co., whose main office and factory is located at Chestnut and Mulberry Sts. The concern had its beginnings in 1866.

The concern had its beginnings in 1866 when George Krementz, in partnership with two other young men, commenced manufacturing, in a small way, on the second floor of 14 Oliver St., Newark. This partnership did not continue long. After another change in business, Mr. Krementz associated himself, in 1869, the very year whose anniversary we are now observing, his cousin, Julius Lebkuecher. At that time the firm name was changed to Krementz & Co., which name has been retained ever since.

So rapidly did the business grow that the whole of the Oliver St. building, a three-story and basement structure, was occupied. A few years later this building became too small, and in 1875 the factory building at Chestnut and Mulberry Sts. was purchased. It was remodeled and enlarged, and in the Spring of 1876 was occupied by the firm. A T-shaped addition was built in 1899 on the adjoining lot, extending 75 feet on Chestnut St., with a width of 100 feet. The factory ranked among the best equipped in the country.

When the addition was first built the structure was too large for the immediate demands of Krementz & Co. Accommodations were furnished other jewelry manufacturing concerns, including Larter, Elcox & Co., A Joralemon & Co. and Van Houten Bros. In a few years, however, the company required the whole building for its own needs.

Until 1878 the firm's sales were confined to the jobbing trade. At that time an office was opened in New York and salesmen were sent out to visit the retail trade. From that time the reputation of Krementz & Co., as producers of jewelry of attractive design, fine workmanship and popular price has been growing, until the firm became one of the best known in the United States.

In June, 1894, the principal office of the concern, which was then located at 182-184 Broadway, New York, was removed to Newark so as to bring office and factory into closer connection.

George Krementz, the founder of the concern, invented new articles and the machinery with which to produce them, which has made the firm famous. Among these articles is the Krementz one-piece collar button. Patents for the button and the machinery necessary to make them were secured by Mr. Krementz in 1884. To the collar button has been added the well-known one-piece bean and post cuff button, and the Krementz bodkin clutch vest button. The development of these lines carries the firm's products to all parts of the world.

George Krementz was born in 1837. He was apprenticed to the jewelry firm of Ailing, Hall & Dodd, of Newark, in 1855, and after serving his apprenticeship he entered the employ of Smith & Ford, 25 Maiden Lane, New York city. He remained with this concern tor eight years, the last four of which he was foreman of the factory. He commenced business in Newark on leaving this concern, and continued to take an interest in it up to his death, March 5, 1918.

Julius A. Lebkuecher was born in 1844. After he had served his apprenticeship in the trade he served a number of years in the commercial branch with Smith & Ford.

For four years after leaving there he was a traveling salesman for Leonard Decker. He left him in 1869 to become associated with his cousin, George Krementz. From the time of its formation until his death, May 13, 1913, Mr. Lebkuecher had charge of the sales and the business management of the concern.

Mr. Lebkuecher was elected mayor of Newark in 1894. Although the city administration had been Democratic for many years, he secured a large Republican majority.

Because of their valuable services for the concern, John N. Taylor, Thomas Krementz and Frank Krementz were admitted to an interest in the business in 1893. Mr. Taylor for years represented the firm as a traveling salesman in the eastern territory. Thomas Krementz and Frank Krementz, who were brothers of the senior partner, assisted him in the supervision of the factory.

Mr. Taylor is now head of the jewelry manufacturing concern of Taylor & Co., Inc., and Frank Krementz heads Frank Krementz Co., manufacturing jewelers. Thomas Krementz is retired.

At the death of Julius A. Lebkuecher his son, Carl H., who had been actively engaged in the business, took over his interest in the firm. After the death of George Krementz his two sons, Richard and Walter M., succeeded to his interest. The firm is now composed of Carl H. Lester (the family name having been changed in April, 1918, from Lebkuecher to Lester) and Richard and Walter M. Krementz.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 5th February 1919

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Re: Information Regarding Krementz & Co.

Postby dognose » Sun May 31, 2015 4:34 am

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Krementz & Company - Newark, N.J. - 1913

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Re: Information Regarding Krementz & Co.

Postby dognose » Mon Jun 01, 2015 10:57 am

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At the South-west corner of Chestnut and Mulberry streets, the firm of Krementz & Co., carry on their extensive jewelery manufacturing business. They occupy the greater part of the large four story brick buildings, having a frontage of 185 feet on Chestnut and 55 feet on Mulberry street, also the rear extensions. Our artist has given a faithful portrayal which has been transferred to these pages. The business was commenced in 1869, in a comparatively small way by Messrs. George Krementz and J. A. Lebkuecher, and the same parties with the able corps of assistants which they have gathered about them still carry it on, and have enlarged it to its present proportions. Messrs. Krementz & Co., manufacture a large line of jewelery, principally for ladies wear, and their productions have attained a high reputation with the trade throughout the country. One of the specialties manufactured by this firm we shall not fail to mention, and that is the "Krementz one piece collar button" the invention of Mr. Krementz, which has become the standard collar button of the country, and which is largely exported to Europe. As a mark of the progress in the art, this button now made of a single piece of metal without seam or joint was formerly made of several pieces soldered together, any one at all acquainted with the manipulation of metal will see at once the superiority of this button, the metal having suffered nothing of the annealing effect of the soldering process of the old method, with the consequent softening which must eventually follow. The business offices and salesrooms of this company are at 182 and 184 Broadway, corner of John street, New York city.

Source: Newark, N.J. Illustrated - 1893

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Re: Information Regarding Krementz & Co.

Postby dognose » Tue Jun 02, 2015 4:53 am

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Krementz & Co. - Newark, N.J. - 1914

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Re: Information Regarding Krementz & Co.

Postby dognose » Wed Jun 03, 2015 9:14 am

KREMENTZ COLLAR BUTTONS

Kremeutz & Co., Newark, makers of the Krementz Collar Button, are undoubtedly one of the leaders when it comes to the unrestricted guarantee. It is now upwards of fifteen years since this firm first assured the public that it stood ready to back up its product whatever happened. Throwing itself entirely upon the mercy of the public (and it took considerable courage in those days to do it), it offered to give a new collar button in exchange for any old one which became unsatisfactory in any way. No matter whether a Krementz Collar Button wears off its plate, or is stepped on and bent, or is damaged from any cause whatsoever, the nearest dealer is instructed to give a new button in exchange “and no questions asked."

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The idea seemed ridiculously liberal at first. One of the humorous weeklies poked fun at it by printing a fake ad in which an offer was made to the effect: "No matter what happens, even if you lose it, bring in your old button and we'll give you a new one."

But the Krementz guarantee has admittedly proved to be a paying proposition. The company has stood behind its guarantee, but in so doing it has found that human nature is a much more dependable element than is generally supposed. The number of those who have taken unfair advantage of the Krementz guarantee has been very small. The public has seemed to appreciate that, it a collar button is run over by a road-roller and crushed flat, the company which manufactured it is rightly not the one to suffer.

Such a sweeping guarantee is not practical with all more costly or complicated products. especially mechanical devices, although it is interesting how very far some manufacturers will go in their guarantees and charge up the loss involved to advertising. Richard Sears says his earliest and best advertising was when he replaced a watch which the owner had smashed by his own negligence.

An advertiser of an expensive mechanism who at first guaranteed tor all time has changed to one year, finding that repairs by expensive mechanics were a sore drain on him. It is now an extensive practice among sellers of mechanical devices to guarantee in general for a limited time, and against defective parts for all time.


Source: Printer's Ink - 25th August 1910

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Re: Information Regarding Krementz & Co.

Postby dognose » Thu Jun 04, 2015 5:59 am

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Krementz & Co. - Newark, N.J. - 1904

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Re: Information Regarding Krementz & Co.

Postby dognose » Fri Jun 05, 2015 11:25 am

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Krementz & Co.

In no branch of skilled industry perhaps in the world, has more rapid advances been made than in the jewelers' art, and the industrial pursuits of a kindred nature. In former years, especially for the finer and more artistic productions in these lines, the American people were compelled to look to Europe for their jewelry supplies, but to-day Europeans look to America, to Newark, which manufactures fully seven-eighths of all the jewelry in the whole United States, and is noted for its beauty of designs, excellence of workmanship and highest standards.

One of the more prominent concerns devoted to this important industry, which has done much toward placing Newark to the front as a manufacturer of jewelry and well worthy of more than passing mention is that of Krementz & Co., located at 49 Chestnut street, with branch offices at 286 Fifth avenue, New York City and 722 Shreve Building, San Francisco, Cal., was established in 1868 by George Krementz and Julius A. Lebkuecher, which partnership has continued to the present date and has developed into one of the largest and best known firms engaged in the manufacturing of fine 14 karat gold and platinum jewelry, the line being probably the most extensive and complete one of fine jewelry made under one roof.

To give an idea of the magnitude of the Krementz productions, their wares consist of about forty different lines of jewelry, of which the following are the most important:

Ladies' jewelry–Brooch pins, veil pins, necklaces, lavalliers, bar and handy pins, bangles and bracelets, lorgnons, souroirs, etc. Men's jewelry–Scarf pins, sleeve links, vest buttons, studs, chains, fobs, match boxes, tie clasps.

Krementz & Co. are also the manufacturers of Krementz collar buttons, w hich enjoy a national reputation; in fact, are known the world over, and are made in 18 karat, 14 karat, and 10 karat gold and 14 karat rolled gold plate. One of the latest achievements of this concern is its new patented Bodkin fastener which it uses on mother-of-pearl vest buttons and studs for evening dress. While these mother-of-pearl dress sets for gentlemen are much in vogue now and finding a very ready sale, this new Bodkin attachment has given a very material impetus to the popularity of this line.

The very newest of its creation is the making of the bean and post of a gentleman's cuff button of one single piece of metal. This feature has greatly increased the output of men's cuff buttons.

The richness, strength, durability and beauty of style and finish of the jewelry which this establishment turns out, are marvelous. A firm and unalterable determination from the start to use nothing but the best and purest among materials, to employ artists of the highest order, and workmen of skill and character, it has built upon this foundation an industry of grandeur and promise.

The illustration shown above of the Krementz building gives an idea of the large space and facilities required in the manufacture of the various products, while in the neighborhood of three hundred skilled workers are continuously employed to conduct this immense business.


Source: Newark, the City of Industry: Facts and Figures Concerning the Metropolis of New Jersey - Published under auspices of Newark Board of Trade - 1912

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Re: Information Regarding Krementz & Co.

Postby dognose » Sat Jun 06, 2015 7:43 am

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Krementz & Co. - Newark, N.J. - 1920

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Re: Information Regarding Krementz & Co.

Postby dognose » Sun Jun 07, 2015 7:57 am

George Krementz

Many jewelers were present at the funeral of George Krementz, held from his late home, Newark, N. J., March 7. Mr. Krementz founded Krementz & Co. and had ranked among the leading manufacturing jewelers in the country for many years. He had been in feeble health for some time, though he continued active in business until stricken at the age of 81. He is survived by two sons and three daughters.

Throughout the trade Mr. Krementz was known for his many inventions. Among these were the Krementz one piece collar button, the seamless wedding ring and the bodkin clutch fastener for military and other buttons. Patents were secured for these inventions, and also for the machinery with which they were made, which were also inventions of Mr. Krementz.


Source: The Brass World and Platers' Guide - March 1918

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Re: Information Regarding Krementz & Co.

Postby dognose » Mon Jun 08, 2015 3:02 am

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Krementz & Co. - Newark, N.J. - 1913

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Re: Information Regarding Krementz & Co.

Postby dognose » Wed Jun 10, 2015 1:05 pm

Gold Plate Jewelry of Quality

Krementz 14kt. rolled gold plate differs from ordinary jewelry in three respects, First it is guaranteed as follows:

If a piece of Krementz 14-kt. rolled gold plate jewelry is damaged from any cause, even if it is stepped upon and crush, any dealer anywhere, or we, will replace it free.

Second, all exposed parts of Krementz 14-kt. rolled gold plate jewelry are 14-kt. gold.

Third, it excels in superiority of design.

Krementz plate is so well and strongly made that it has always been sold under an iron-clad guarantee. it wears for a lifetime. and it is so strong that nothingshort of stepping upon it will break any piece of Krementz plate jewelry. Since this so seldom happens, Krementz 8: Company have always been willing to guarantee it and the replenishments are few indeed.

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No solder is used in the construction of Krementz plate. Through using machinery, exclusive with Krementz & Company, this Jewelry is made with all exposed parts 14-kt. gold. The gold is hammered in the making until it is so had it resists wear for a lifetime. Due to all exposed parts being 14kt. gold, Krementz plate would not be distinguishable from solid gold jewelry, were needs except scarf pins and chains.
it not for the fact that each piece is stamped on the back with the words “Krementz Plate".

Krementz & Company state that they are the largest manufacturers in America of line solid gold and platinum jewelry, which jewelry is sold in the most exclusive shops. In marketing jewelry of this kind, design and line workmanship play an important part. Since Krementz 14-kt. rolled gold plate is made in the same shops and by the same workmen who make their solid gold and platinum Jewelry, it is easy to understand why Krementz plate excels in design and is superior in finish.

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The features mentioned above have made Krementz plate extremely popular, being universally sold throughout the world. It is extremely popular in the tropical countries as the hardened 14-kt. gold successfully resists the combined action of excessive perspiration and the acids of the body, never tarnishing the gold or blackening the skin.

The Krementz line of 14-kt. rolled gold plate jewelry embodies everything a man needs except scarf-pins and chains. There are many styles of collar buttons for him to select from. In loose links and dumb-bells the patterns are of endless variety.

Their tie clasps are made with a concealed spring. The shirt studs and vest buttons of the evening Jewelry are fitted ‘with a patented bodkin clutch back which “goes through the stiffest shirt front like a needle and holds like an anchor” until voluntarily released.

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This bodkin back has also been fitted to mother-of-pearl coat buttons. which are extremely popular wherever washable suits are worn. due to the ease with which they may be removed.

Krementz catalogue illustrates the complete line. It is printed in Spanish, Portuguese and English and is free to any merchant writing for it. Address: Krementz & Company, Newark, New Jersey, U.S.A.


Source: Dun's International Review - May 1918

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Re: Information Regarding Krementz & Co.

Postby dognose » Thu Jun 11, 2015 3:28 am

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Krementz & Co. - Newark, N.J. - 1908

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Re: Information Regarding Krementz & Co.

Postby silverly » Fri Jun 12, 2015 2:49 pm

A few things about George Krementz from primary sources:

18 June 1851 George Krementz with his father, mother and siblings arrived in New York City aboard the Mocambique. They came from Nassau, Germany and the father's occuption was listed as Miller.

1860 US Census George Krementz with his parents and siblings listed in New Albany, Indiana as a Goldsmith as was his father Martin at that time.

18 May 1878 George Krementz US Passport Application shows birth at Wiesbadan, Baden, Germany on 6 November 1837.

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Re: Information Regarding Krementz & Co.

Postby dognose » Sat Jun 13, 2015 6:01 am

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Krementz & Co. - Newark, N.J. - 1912

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Re: Information Regarding Krementz & Co.

Postby dognose » Sun Jun 14, 2015 7:26 am

Some images of the interior of Krementz & Co.'s works at Chestnut Street, Newark:

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These images are from 1918.

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Re: Information Regarding Krementz & Co.

Postby dognose » Mon Jun 15, 2015 4:42 am

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Krementz & Co. - Newark, N.J. - 1884

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Re: Information Regarding Krementz & Co.

Postby dognose » Tue Jun 16, 2015 4:56 am

John Kister, a dangerous burglar who has served ten years of a thirty years term in the state prison at Trenton, N. J., has fallen heir to $60,000 left him by a relative in Devonshire, England. The convict was a confederate of Red Leary and other infamous cracksmen, and had figured prominently in several daring jewelry store robberies. Kister was finally captured and sentenced to 30 years' imprisonment for the robbery of Krementz & Co.'s factory at Newark, N. J.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - June 1884

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