British Military Accoutrement Makers - Advertisements & Information

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Re: Military Accoutrement Makers - Advertisements & Information

Postby dognose » Fri Sep 11, 2015 1:43 pm

JAMES McKIERNAN

15, St. John's Lane and 7, Albion Place, Clerkenwell, later, 62, St. John's Square, Clerkenwell, London


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James McKiernan - London - 1870

Formerly in partnership with George Kenning as Kenning & McKiernan until 27th March 1865.

Notice is hereby given, that the Copartnership heretofore carried on at No. 4, Little Britain, in the city of London, by George Kenning and James McKiernan, as Gold Lacemen, under the style or firm of Kenning and McKiernan, was this day dissolved by mutual consent. Mr. George Kenning is empowered to receive and pay all debts respectively due to and by the said copartnership concern.—

Dated this 27th day of March, 1865.

George Kenning
James McKiernan


Source: The London Gazette - 28th March 1865

Noted as a contractor to Her Majesty's Government.

James McKiernan entered his mark 'JMcK' contained within an oblong punch, with the London Assay Office on the 20th March 1867.

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Re: Military Accoutrement Makers - Advertisements & Information

Postby dognose » Tue Nov 10, 2015 1:15 pm

OAKES & SON

6, Exeter Row, Birmingham


DISSOLUTIONS OF PARTNERSHIP

Oakes and Son.—6 Exeter row, military ornament makers, platers and spur makers. John Oakes, William Oakes. Debts received and paid by William Oakes, who will in future carry on the business on his own account. 26th August 1864.


Source: The Birmingham Commercial List - Estell & Co. - 1874

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Re: Military Accoutrement Makers - Advertisements & Information

Postby dognose » Thu Dec 03, 2015 3:24 pm

ACCOUTREMENTS

The term “accoutrements” connotes a vast number of objects, some of which are useful and others merely ornamental. To describe in detail the manufacture of military caps and helmets, ornamented belts, embroidered, badges, gold and silver lace, stamped buttons, etc., would require a considerable amount of space. It must suffice here to point out that all British-made goods of this kind are of far better quality than the products of foreign factories, and are much superior in point of artistic merit. Without a reputation -for thoroughly honest workmanship, no firm of accoutrementmakers could hope to obtain custom in this country or in any other part of the Empire. Moreover, the really successful firm must possess a precise knowledge of the exact requirements of every regiment or quasi-military organisation—such, for example, as a fire brigade—and of the various insignia worn on various occasions in various ways as part of military and civil uniforms. It will be found that this knowledge is a vast accumulation of facts gathered during a long course of years and stored up for the benefit of military tailors and other retail dealers. A brief account of the development and present condition of the manufacture of embossed buttons—the most common and convenient of all forms of the badge—may help the reader to understand the comprehensive nature of the productive and distributive business of the accoutrement-maker.

It is not easy to ascertain when ornamental brass buttons came into general use in this country. It is probable, however, that they first became fashionable when the manufacture of cloth-covered buttons was prohibited by a statute of the reign of George I. However that may be, we know that in 1702 or 1703 the founder of the most important firm of accoutrement-makers in London sold them at the Red Lion, “over against Norfolk Street, in the Strand,” and that he subsequently received a charter from George II. In those days, according to the Birmingham Directory for 1777, “buttonmaking was a very tedious and expensive business. The button consisted of one solid piece of metal, and the ornaments on the face of it were the work of an engraver. To obviate this the press, stamp and engine for turning the moulds were invented.”_ The invention and gradual improvement of this machinery has greatly diminished the cost of the button, which is also a badge of dignity, and has placed it within the reach of every person who has the right to wear the uniform to which it forms an adjunct. In the Eighteenth Century the use of stamped metal buttons was generally confined to the services or to those who wore the “King’s coat” and to the “retainers” of men of rank and lineage, but nowadays every hunt, every yacht club, all police and railway officials, and a great number of corporate bodies have their special buttons.

On the premises of a great firm of accoutrement-makers all the numerous processes involved in the making of a stamped button, from cutting the plain discs out of a sheet of metal to placing the polished perfect buttons on cards, may be seen in operation. Perhaps the. most striking feature of such an establishment is the extraordinary number of dies to be seen arranged in cases on every spare space of wall. The cost of making a pair of dies (necessarily there must be a pair of them, the one for stamping coat buttons and the other for stamping the smaller ones used on the'waistcoat) varies from 80s. to 7gs. When it is said that the old-established firm to which reference has been already made has over 50,000 pairs of these dies, some idea may be formed of the amount of capital invested in the business. The business of this firm increased 25 per cent. in volume after the beginning of hostilities in South Africa—a fact which throws a curious sidelight on the economic effects of a great war.

Another important branch of this firm’s business is the manufacture of metal helmets for the Household Cavalry and the Dragoons, for the London Fire Brigade, and for many county volunteer brigades.


Source: Great Britain, Her Finance and Commerce - Morning Post - 1901

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Re: Military Accoutrement Makers - Advertisements & Information

Postby dognose » Fri Dec 04, 2015 4:42 am

HARRISON & SMITH

Alma Street Button Works, Birmingham; 74, High Street, Manchester; 62, Argyle Street, Glasgow, and 8, Trinity Street, Dublin


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Harrison & Smith - Birmingham - 1885

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Re: Military Accoutrement Makers - Advertisements & Information

Postby dognose » Thu Dec 10, 2015 1:40 pm

WILLIAM JENKINSON & Co.

Albion Hall, White Street, Moorfields, and, 44, London Wall, and, 18, Panton Street, Haymarket


One of the oldest established firms in the metropolis who supply saddlers’ universal requirements is that of Messrs. Wm. Jenkinson and Co., of Albion Hall, White Street, Moorfields, E.C., who have established and maintained a reputation for sound workmanship and good quality of material. The business was originally founded by a Mr. Goodwin, of Bloxwich, \Valsall, in 1750, who traded as lorimer, bridle bit and stirrup maker, so that although now under a new name, it has been carried on for over 150 years, and has developed wonderfully during this lengthy period. The business was acquired in 1844 from Mr. Green, a saddlers’ ironmonger who succeeded Mr. Goodwin, by the late Mr. Wm. Jenkinson, sen., a native of Colton, near Windermere, who served a seven years’ apprenticeship with Mr. Crosthwaite, of Ulverston (Furness), and for some considerable time was carried on as a retail establishment. Mr. Jenkinson was formerly a journeyman in the West End of London, and before commencing business on his own account had charge of a saddler’s establishment in the City, and so laid the foundation of his subsequently successful career. The rapid development of the business at London Wall necessitated at an early date increased facilities, and the freehold of the whole of the building was therefore secured. After a short time further extensions were made, and at first part, and later the whole, of Albion Hall Buildings. within a stone's throw of London Wall, were acquired as a Workshop and warehouse, the principals then being Mr. Wm. Jenkinson, sen., Mr. Wm. Jenkinson, jun., the eldest son, and Mr. Joseph Webb Squier, a nephew. Mr. Jenkinson, sen., retired in 1879. and died about eight years ago. Two younger sons were admitted into partnership at a later stage, and each department of the business, therefore, came under the direct personal, supervision of a member of the firm. The business is now carried on by Mr. Wm. Jenkinson, Mr. George Jenkinson, and Mr. J. W. Squier, the two former being in charge of the wholesale establishment at Moorfields, whilst the latter controls the retail department at London Wall, where the firm’s own manufactures. consisting of saddlery, travelling requisites, fancy leather and other goods, are stocked. In addition to these two establishments the firm have also extensive premises at 18 Panton Street, Haymarket, S.W.

On a recent visit to Albion Hall we were greatly impressed by the multifarious array of saddlery goods of every description, and we should recommend provincial saddlers when in town to give this firm a call, for an inspection of their stock and workrooms would undoubtedly prove instructive and interesting. On the top floor we saw the workmen engaged in the manufacture of fitted and other cases, bridles coachman‘s boots, etc. The latest improvements in machinery for trimming, pricking, punching, veining, etc., are used in this department. One of their specialities also manufactured here is the riveted lawn boot. in which there is no stitching whatever, whilst another useful line is a hoof pad used to prevent the sharp edges of the hoofs or shoes injuring the horse when lying down in the stable, and this is in great demand by horse owners. Light fancy articles complete the manufactures of this department. In another room on the same floor waterproof goods were being produced, and some entirely new designs were brought to our notice. One of these was a very smart-looking cashmere coat edged with leather. The advantages of this innovation will, of course, be apparent to all who have handled waterproof goods, for whilst the ordinary coat soon frays at the edges and exposes the interlining of rubber, the new design of Messrs. Jenkinson and Co. is calculated to resist the hardest wear. The effect, too, is very pleasing, and there should be a good demand for this class of goods. Another smart coat manufactured by this firm is of box-cloth, thoroughly waterproof and of fine texture.

In the horse clothing department there was an exceptionally fine show of girths, rollers, etc., whilst rosettes were also being made in large quantities. The sale of rosettes depends largely, of course, upon the weather, but in anticipation of a rush during April, Messrs. Jenkinson and Co. have been engaged in the production of these for some considerable time. With regard to horse clothing there is little demand at the present time, but this firm are already preparing for the autumn and winter seasons, and pride themselves on the fact that they retain the services of all their workpeople as far as possible even though there is no immediate sale for the goods they manufacture. Perhaps the only machine of its kind for trimming horse clothing is that invented by Mr. J. W. Squier, and used in this department. It can be adjusted from ¼in. to 2in., and is worked by means of detachable measuring rods, the speed being regulated as desired.

In the black harness department, despite the depression in trade, there were signs of a fair amount of business being done. All the harness is hand-stitched throughout, there being no harness stitching machinery on the premises.

The stock-rooms we found packed with every conceivable description of saddlery, harness, and other leather goods. Here was displayed mule harness for the West Indies side by side with elegant sets of carriage pair-harness, whilst on other shelves was heavy farm harness, etc., and saddles innumerable. We were particularly interested in a model of a saddle made for the son of President Roosevelt, of which we give an illustration, which was of exceptionally fine quality, and has brought many repeat orders. Messrs. Jenkinson have now placed on the market a “Roosevelt” saddle, in every respect identical with the one sent to the United States, and this has become exceedingly popular.

A new department is now being added on the first floor, where, by the way, there is a fine model of a black horse for the display of saddlery. This department will shortly contain every description of fancy leather goods and travelling requisites of the firm’s own manufacture. and in which they are now specialising.

In addition a considerable amount of space will be devoted to the display of sporting goods of all kinds, including golf, cricket, tennis, and polo accessories. Some especially fine suit and sample cases are now exhibited in their stock-rooms, whilst cases made to order receive every attention.

In racing saddles, Messrs. Jenkinson do a large trade. and our attention was attracted bv a very light saddle weighing about 2lbs. complete. This is, however, by no means the lightest racing saddle made by this firm, who not long ago made to the order of an American visitor a saddle which, when complete, weighed only 16ozs. Repairs of all kinds are executed at Albion Hall, this being not the least important department of the business.

On the ground floor is the harness furniture and general ironmongery department, whilst a large stock of leather is also stored in the basement, together with collar check, webs, rugs. etc. A fireproof room is provided for the storage of oils, dubbing, composition, and other proprietary articles.

Throughout our inspection of the premises we were particularly impressed with the splendid facilities for dealing with the vast assortment of goods which this progressive firm handle, whilst the immense stock of everything a saddler needs speaks well for their enterprise, and justifies their claim to having one of the most convenient and complete saddlery and harness establishments in London. We have already mentioned that this firm originally started as a retail business, out of which their wholesale connection subsequently grew. Messrs. Wm. Jenkinson and Co. are now endeavouring to increase the sale of their goods through the trade. and are advertising in some of the best and widest circulating illustrated papers (such as Country Life) that their goods can be obtained “through saddlers everywhere at home and abroad." Our commentary would be incomplete without a word of commendation for the courtesy extended to us which rendered our visit an enjoyable one.


Source: Saddlery and Harness - April 1908



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Wm. Jenkinson & Co. - London - 1905

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W. Jenkinson & Co. - London - 1908

Established in 1750.

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Re: Military Accoutrement Makers - Advertisements & Information

Postby dognose » Fri Dec 11, 2015 6:12 am

GARDEN & SON

200, Piccadilly, London


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Garden and Son - London - 1877

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Re: Military Accoutrement Makers - Advertisements & Information

Postby dognose » Sat Dec 12, 2015 11:17 am

HAWKES & Co.

14, Piccadilly, London


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Hawkes & Compy. - London - 1899

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Re: Military Accoutrement Makers - Advertisements & Information

Postby dognose » Sat Dec 26, 2015 7:49 am

SIMPSON & ROOK

9 & 10, Little Britain, London


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Simpson & Rook - London - 1875

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Simpson & Rook - London - 1882

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Simpson & Rook - London - 1884

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Simpson & Rook - London - 1885

Simpson & Rook were noted as exhibitors at the Calcutta International Exhibition, 1883-84, and the Melbourne Centennial International Exhibition 1888-89

Their exhibit at Melbourne was recorded as thus in the official catalogue:

Simpson & Rook, 9 and 10 Little Britain, London, Manufacturers of Naval and Military Accoutrements, Helmets, Caps, Gold and Silver Laces, Cord, Braid, and Embroidery.

The Exhibit consists of Naval and Military Cocked Hats, Helmets, Caps, and Belts. Specimens of Military, Diplomatic, Court, and Heraldic Embroidery; Gold and Silver Embroidery Materials, Laces, Cord, and Braid.

Simpson & Rook, being the only Lacemen in England who manufacture their own materials, are in a position to guarantee the quality of all goods supplied, and also to compete favourably with other firms.

The contract for the supply of all the Laces used in the Imperial Army Clothing Departments has been in our hands more than twelve years.


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Re: Military Accoutrement Makers - Advertisements & Information

Postby dognose » Wed Feb 03, 2016 6:37 am

LINCOLN, BENNETT & Co.

Sackville Street, Piccadilly, and 23 & 24, Nelson Square and 19, Charlotte Street, Blackfriars Road, London and Birmingham, Manchester and Glasgow


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Lincoln, Bennett & Co. - London - 1881

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Lincoln, Bennett & Co. - London - 1893

Noted as exhibitors at the Philadelphia Exhibition 1876, Paris Exhibition 1878, Sydney Exhibition 1879, Melbourne Exhibition 1880-1881, and the Chicago Exhibition 1893.

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Re: Military Accoutrement Makers - Advertisements & Information

Postby dognose » Sat Feb 06, 2016 1:28 pm

THOMAS TOWNEND & Co.

110, Oxford Street and 16, 17, and 18, Lime Street and 14, Fenchurch Street and 130, London Wall, London and at Bredbury, Stockport and Atherston, Warwick


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Thos. Townend & Co. - London - 1872

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Thomas Townend & Co. - London - 1872

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Thomas Townend & Co. - London - 1875

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Re: Military Accoutrement Makers - Advertisements & Information

Postby dognose » Mon Feb 22, 2016 2:05 pm

THOMAS BENT WILKINS

84, Vyse Street, Birmingham


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Thomas Bent Wilkins - Birmingham - 1858

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Thomas Bent Wilkins - Birmingham - 1858

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Re: Military Accoutrement Makers - Advertisements & Information

Postby dognose » Mon Feb 29, 2016 4:37 am

CHARLES ROWLEY & Co.

23, Newhall Street, Birmingham, 31, Addle Street, later, 49, Aldermanbury, London and 1, High Street, Manchester


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Charles Rowley & Co. - Birmingham - 1860

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Charles Rowley & Co. - Birmingham - 1862

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Charles Rowley & Co. - Birmingham - 1863


Later to become J. Nicklin & Co. (see above post).

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Re: Military Accoutrement Makers - Advertisements & Information

Postby dognose » Wed Mar 02, 2016 5:44 am

PIGOTT & Co.

31-32, St. Paul's Square, Birmingham, and London


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Pigott & Co. - Birmingham - 1862

Successors to Thomas Ledsam & Sons.

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Re: Military Accoutrement Makers - Advertisements & Information

Postby dognose » Sun Mar 20, 2016 5:59 am

SIMONS

100, Houndsditch, London


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Simons - London - 1917

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Re: Military Accoutrement Makers - Advertisements & Information

Postby dognose » Sun Apr 17, 2016 12:56 pm

JOHN GUMMERY

Blackwell Street, Kidderminster


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Gummery - Kidderminster - 1820

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Re: Military Accoutrement Makers - Advertisements & Information

Postby dognose » Mon Jun 27, 2016 1:36 pm

REEVES, GREAVES, & REEVES

Bartholomew Street, later, Charlotte Street Mills, Newhall Street, Birmingham


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Reeves, Greaves, & Reeves - Birmingham - 1851

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Re: Military Accoutrement Makers - Advertisements & Information

Postby dognose » Fri Jul 01, 2016 12:27 pm

J.W. LEWIS

38, Howard Street, Birmingham


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J.W. Lewis - Birmingham - 1851

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Re: Military Accoutrement Makers - Advertisements & Information

Postby dognose » Tue Sep 06, 2016 3:37 am

J. WISE & SONS

Birmingham


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J.W & S - Birmingham - 1907


Member silvermakersmarks wrote:

The form of the lion passant and date letter punches mark this as being a Birmingham mark from 1907. The maker's mark is that of J Wise & Sons who registered this mark in 1904 as "military ornament makers". There is only a partial hallmark because the rest of it is on the other part of the belt.

See: viewtopic.php?f=58&t=45583

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Re: Military Accoutrement Makers - Advertisements & Information

Postby dognose » Wed Jan 25, 2017 2:17 pm

JOSEPH WINGFIELD

78, Buckingham Street, Birmingham


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Joseph Wingfield - Birmingham - 1858

Late with J.W. Lewis. See: viewtopic.php?f=38&t=39456&p=130752&hilit=lewis#p130752

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Re: Military Accoutrement Makers - Advertisements & Information

Postby dognose » Sun Jan 29, 2017 6:57 am

CHARLES REEVES

Toledo Works, Charlotte Street, Birmingham and 8, Air Street, Piccadilly, London


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Charles Reeves - Birmingham and London - 1858

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Charles Reeves - Birmingham and London - 1860

Perhaps to be identified with the earlier firm of Reeves, Greaves & Reeves, see: viewtopic.php?f=38&t=39456&p=130605&hilit=reeves#p130605

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