The Newcastle and North of England Trade - Information, Advertisements, Examples

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Re: The Newcastle Trade - Information, Advertisements, Examples

Postby dognose » Thu Apr 06, 2017 4:46 am

Marks of the Newcastle Assay Office taken from The Book of Hall Marks, Or, Manual of Reference for the Gold and Silversmith By Alfred Lutschaunig - 1872:

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Re: The Newcastle Trade - Information, Advertisements, Examples

Postby dognose » Sat Jul 22, 2017 4:10 am

KIRTON

Dean Street, South Shields


1842 (May 19.)—Thursday morning, about six o'clock, the shop of Mr. Kirton, jeweller, Dean-street, South Shields, was discovered to be on fire. Considerable alarm was excited as to the safety of the adjoining houses, but owing to the promptitude with which the men in Messrs. Cookson's employ brought the engine belonging to the glass-works, and the friendly aid afforded by the neighbours in furnishing water, the fire was soon restrained; and a short time after, the town waterplugs were opened, and other engines employed, so that the fire was extinguished. The loss of jewellery was considerable.

Source: The Local Historian's Table Book: Of Remarkable Occurrences, Historical Facts, Traditions ... Connected with the Counties of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Northumberland and Durham - Moses Aaron Richardson - 1846

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Re: The Newcastle Trade - Information, Advertisements, Examples

Postby dognose » Sun Aug 13, 2017 1:18 pm

WILLIAM LISTER - WILLIAM LISTER & SON - WILLIAM LISTER & SONS

12, 14, 16 & 17, Mosley Street, Newcastle-upon-Tyne



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W. Lister - Newcastle - 1828

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W. Lister - Newcastle - 1834

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W. Lister - Newcastle - 1836

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Wm. Lister - Newcastle - 1836

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Wm. Lister & Son - Newcastle - 1838

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Wm. Lister & Son - Newcastle - 1839

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Wm. Lister & Sons - Newcastle - 1840

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Lister & Sons - Newcastle - 1842

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Wm. Lister & Sons - Newcastle - 1842

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Lister & Sons - Newcastle - 1843

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Lister & Sons - Newcastle - 1843

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Lister & Sons - Newcastle - 1863

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Lister & Sons - Newcastle - 1868

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Lister & Sons - Newcastle - 1869


William Lister served his apprenticeship under Clement Gowland of Sunderland.

William Lister married Margaret Gowland on the 28th Augut 1814, at Sunderland. William died on the 3rd November 1868, aged 82 years.

William Lister & Sons was the partnership of William Lister and his sons, William (II) and Clement Lister.

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Re: The Newcastle and North of England Trade - Information, Advertisements, Examples

Postby dognose » Thu Aug 17, 2017 8:31 am

RICHARD DUNCAN

5, Crown & Anchor Lane, Market Place, later, 40, English Street, Carlisle


R. DUNCAN, WORKING SILVERSMITH, etc., (Late with Mr. Bateman, London, Silversmith to his present Majesty,) Begs most respectfully to inform the Noblility and Gentry of Carlisle and its Vicinity, that he has commenced working at the above Business.

Source: Carlisle Journal - 3rd August 1833


Richard Duncan entered his marks, 'RD' contained within an oval punch, with the Newcastle Assay Office as from the 17th December 1833.

Richard Duncan, silversmith, was noted as a member of the Carlisle Temperance Association in 1837.


At New York, Mr. Richard Duncan, silversmith, formerly of Carlisle, to Miss Elizabeth Noble, also late of Carlisle.

Source: Carlisle Journal - 18th December 1841

Richard Duncan appointed Dentist at Carlisle, c.1858.

Richard Duncan later removed to Whitehaven, where he practised as a Dentist. He died somewhere between 1861 and 1865.

See: http://www.925-1000.com/dlNewcastle2.html (Robert Duncan, should read Richard Duncan)

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Re: The Newcastle and North of England Trade - Information, Advertisements, Examples

Postby dognose » Thu Aug 24, 2017 3:41 am

W. WILSON

105, Pilgrim Street, Newcastle-upon-Tyne


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W. Wilson - Newcastle - 1847

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Re: The Newcastle and North of England Trade - Information, Advertisements, Examples

Postby dognose » Fri Sep 15, 2017 6:17 am

ROBERT MAKEPEACE I

The Side, Newcastle


"Richard, by the grace of God King of England and France, and lord of Ireland, to whomsoever these presents shall come, greeting. Know ye that we, considering the honour of the town of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, of our special grace concede to our beloved William Bishopdale, now Mayor, as long as he shall be Mayor, and to all others who in future time shall be Mayors of the aforesaid town, that before him and them one sword may be carried; the which sword we concede truly for the cause above written. In witness whereof, etc., at Westminster, the 23th day of January, in the fourteenth of our reign."—Letters Patent Of Richard II., 1391

The office of sword-bearer in Newcastle was formerly one of dignity and honour, and the discharge of its duties was considered fit employment for persons occupying respectable positions in life. From the date of its creation under the letters patent quoted above, down to recent times, a succession of worthy citizens marched before the Mayors of Newcastle bearing the double-edged emblem of royal favour. Some of them valued the post for the pomp, the pageantry, the good company and the good living, rather than for the emoluments they derived from it, though these, in the shape of fees and bounties, may have been at one time considerable. To precede the Chief Magistrate upon all occasions of ceremony, dressed like his Worship, in robes of office; to wait upon illustrious persons visiting or passing through the town, and present them with substantial gifts from the Mayor and his brethren; to issue all official invitations to municipal banquets and entertainments, and partake of the good cheer provided—these formed a series of occupations that to a wellbred and well-favoured man must have been easy to undertake and pleasant to follow.

Towards the middle of the eighteenth century the duties of sword-bearer in Newcastle were discharged by Robert Makepeace, a member of the Goldsmiths' Company. He was appointed in 1732, and occupied the post for thirteen years. In 1745, on the day that the young Pretender embarked upon his rash attempt to recover the English crown, John Ord, the Mayor of Newcastle, died in London, and shortly afterwards Makepeace resigned his office.


Source: Men of Mark 'twixt Tyne and Tweed: A-C - Richard Welford - 1895


Robert Makepeace I served his apprenticeship under Francis Batty II. He was Warden of the Company on 17 occasions and a Member of the Common Council, he died on the 9th May 1755.

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Re: The Newcastle and North of England Trade - Information, Advertisements, Examples

Postby dognose » Sun Sep 17, 2017 6:23 am

A.H. ROSS

Press Lane, High Street, later, 138, High Street, later, 25, Bridge Street, Bishopwearmouth, Sunderland


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A.H. Ross - Sunderland - 1847

The business of Archibald Hilton Ross.

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Re: The Newcastle and North of England Trade - Information, Advertisements, Examples

Postby dognose » Tue Oct 10, 2017 4:43 am

RALPH BEILBY


RALPH BEILBY

Thomas Bewick's Master

It was a happy event for Newcastle when William Beilby, a Scarborough silversmith, failing in business at Durham, brought his family to the banks of the Tyne, and endeavoured among the nobility and gentry of Northumberland, and the merchants and tradesmen of Newcastle and Gateshead, to woo fickle fortune anew. A happy event because William Beilby's sons and daughters were gifted beyond the common run of people in their social position, and had the happy faculty of endowing other young men and women with their own tastes for intellectual pursuits, and with some share of their own devotion to the study and practice of art. Richard, the eldest son, had served an apprenticeship to a die-sinker, or seal engraver, at Birmingham; William, the second son, had learned enamelling and painting at the same place; Ralph, who was a skilful musician, had been brought up to his father's trade of a silversmith and jeweller, and had acquired the art of seal-cutting from Richard; Thomas and Mary were taught enamelling and painting by William, and gave lessons in drawing. Thus music, drawing, engraving, and enamelling had each its representative in the household, contributing to the resources of the family, and giving an impulse to the cultivation of art in Newcastle, which was genuine and effective while it lasted, and useful long after.

The Beilbys lived at Gateshead, where the father carried on his business, and where he and his son Richard died. The mother and the daughters opened a school after the father's death, and the sons assisted in keeping the family circle together. An opportunity occurred about this time for Ralph to commence business on his own account, and he was not slow to take advantage of it. An engraver named Jameson, who carried on a respectable trade in Newcastle, was charged with committing a forgery upon the Old Bank, and was tried for the crime. The evidence was insufficient to convict him, but his character was destroyed and he left the town. Ralph Beilby started a workshop directly afterwards and obtained the patronage and support which Jameson had forfeited. Presently his mother and sister gave up the school at Gateshead and came to Newcastle to keep house for him; the brothers joined them, and assisted in the workshop; copper-plate printing (introduced into the town, as already described, by Joseph Barber) was added to seal engraving and the marking of plate; and in a short time a substantial business was built up.

During the summer of 1767, Ralph and William Beilby, being at Bywell on a visit to the widow of the Rev. Mr. Simons, one of the vicars of that place, were told of a young genius, her godson, whose passion for drawing pictures upon gravestones and flagstones and the walls of houses could not be repressed, and whose future life it was desirable to fix. They were so much interested in her account of him that they set off with the old lady and her daughter to visit his parents, who were living at Cherryburn, near Eltringham, on the other side of the water. This visit turned out more important than any of them imagined. They were pleased with Mrs. Simons' godson, and he was delighted with them. Before they left the house it was arranged that he should enter the workshop of the Beilbys on trial, with a view to apprenticeship. The probation was satisfactory to both parties. On the 1st of October, indentures were signed which bound Ralph Beilby, at his house near Amen Corner, facing St. Nicholas' Churchyard, to teach the art of engraving to Thomas Bewick.

Most of that which is known respecting Ralph Beilby comes to us through Thomas Bewick's Autobiography. "The first jobs I was put to do," writes Bewick, "was blocking out the wood about the lines on the diagrams (which my master finished) for the 'Ladies' Diary,' on which he was employed by Charles Hutton, and etching sword blades for William and Nicholas Oley, sword manufacturers, etc., at Shotley Bridge. It was not long till the diagrams were wholly put into my hands to finish. After these I was kept closely employed upon a variety of other jobs, for such was the industry of my master that he refused nothing, coarse or fine. He undertook everything, which he did in the best way he could. He fitted-up and tempered his own tools, and adapted them to every purpose, and taught me to do the same. This readiness brought him in an overflow of work, and the workplace was filled with the coarsest kind of steel stamps, pipe moulds, bottle moulds, brass clock faces, door plates, coffin plates, bookbinders' letters and stamps, steel, silver, and gold seals, mourning rings, etc. He also undertook the engraving of arms, crests, and cyphers on silver, and every kind of job from the silversmiths; also engraving bills of exchange, bank-notes, invoices, account-heads, and cards. These last he executed as well as did most of the engravers of the time, but what he excelled in was ornamental silver engraving. In this, as far as I am able to judge, he was one of the best in the kingdom."

In wood-engraving Mr. Beilby was not so fortunate. Bewick states that what he did was wretched. He did not like the work, but was forced into it by a desire to oblige Dr. Charles Hutton, who designed bill-heads for him, writing with an ink or preparation which was easily transferred to the copper. The doctor procured boxwood from London, with the necessary tools for cutting it, and tried to interest his friend in the operation, but nothing of the kind had been executed in Newcastle before, and Beilby was too old to learn; Bewick, however, took kindly to the work, and soon became an adept. Dr. Hutton used to say with pride that it was he who really taught wood-engraving to Bewick, and enabled the firm of Beilby to undertake that class of art workmanship in Newcastle.

In 1777, Beilby took his former apprentice into partnership, and in 1780 he married, his wife being Ellen, daughter of John Hawthorn, of Newcastle, watchmaker. Beilby looked after the engraving on silver, etc.; Bewick developed the engraving on wood, and between them they obtained a large and remunerative connection. In 1785 Bewick commenced to engrave blocks for a "History of Quadrupeds," and Mr. Beilby, "being of a bookish or reading turn," employed his evenings at home in writing the descriptive matter. They were then living, Beilby in West Spital Tower, newly turned into a dwelling-house, and Bewick in a house at the Forth which had been tenanted by Dr. Hutton, part of whose furniture he had purchased. The book was published in 1790, and sold rapidly. It was followed by a "History of British Birds," the first volume of which came out in 1797, and was eagerly purchased. To this volume also Mr. Beilby compiled the letterpress, and it was his last effort of that kind. He had for some time been in partnership with a firm of watch-glass manufacturers in Dean Court; and as soon as the first volume of the Birds was issued he gave up the engraving business altogether, dissolved his connection with Bewick, and devoted himself to the glass factory. In this new undertaking he was equally enterprising and successful. When their premises were destroyed by fire in 1806 the firm erected a new manufactory in Orchard Street, and added to their production of watch-glasses the making of clock-work. He continued in that business till the infirmities of age overtook him, and he sought in retirement the repose to which an unusually active and busy life entitled him.

Ralph Beilby's fame has been overshadowed by that of his apprentice and partner, and his attainments have received less recognition than they deserved. For he was undoubtedly a man of genius, with great originality and force of character. To the manners and polish of a gentleman, he added social qualities which endeared him to a select and intelligent circle. Among his most intimate friends was the Rev. John Brand, the historian of Newcastle, some of whose letters to him, referring chiefly to the engraving of plates for the History, form one of the tracts of the Newcastle Typographical Society. He was an ardent Churchman, and followed the good old practice of attending his place of worship twice every Sunday, taking his household with him. To this habit there was perhaps a secondary inducement in his love of music, for he was a capable musician, a companion of the younger Avisons, and a performer at some of those local concerts by which unfortunate Dr. Brown, when Vicar of Newcastle, strove to improve musical taste and encourage musical education in the town. His literary acquirements, if not great, were respectable, and, delighting himself in the companionship of books, he was energetic in the encouragement of habits of reading and reflection in others. The formation of the Literary and Philosophical Society in Newcastle had his warmest support. He was one of its founders, acted as a member of the managing committee for many years, and remained one of its most ardent friends to the day of his death. He died on the 4th of January, 1817, in the 74th year of his age, and was buried in the churchyard of St. Andrew, where there is a tombstone to his memory.


Source: Men of Mark 'twixt Tyne and Tweed: A-C - Richard Welford - 1895

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Re: The Newcastle and North of England Trade - Information, Advertisements, Examples

Postby dognose » Wed Oct 25, 2017 5:13 am

H.A. SPIEGELHALTER

28, Flowergate, Whitby


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H.A. Spiegelhalter - Whitby - 1897

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Re: The Newcastle and North of England Trade - Information, Advertisements, Examples

Postby dognose » Wed Nov 01, 2017 6:01 am

T.L. KIDD

33, Flowergate, Whitby


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T.L. Kidd - Whitby - 1897

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Re: The Newcastle and North of England Trade - Information, Advertisements, Examples

Postby dognose » Sat Nov 18, 2017 5:02 am

W.H. DAY & Co.

27, Baxtergate, Whitby


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W.H. Day & Co. - Whitby - 1897

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Re: The Newcastle and North of England Trade - Information, Advertisements, Examples

Postby dognose » Mon Jan 22, 2018 5:12 am

EDWIN COWLEY

130, later, 131, High Street and Dovecot Street, Stockton-on-Tees


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E. Cowley - Stockton-on-Tees - 1901

'Late Gattaneo's' - this appears to be a misprint and should read 'Cattaneo'

Edwin Cowley, born 1851/2, died 1904.

Recorded in Kelly's Directory of the Watch & Clock Trades 1880 at 130, High Street.

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Re: The Newcastle and North of England Trade - Information, Advertisements, Examples

Postby dognose » Thu Jan 25, 2018 7:07 am

CATTANEO & SON

131, High Street, Stockton-on-Tees


Predecessor to the business of Edwin Cowley (see above post).

Recorded in The Post Office Directory of Durham and Northumberland 1879 at 131, High Street.

Recorded in Kelly's Directory of the Watch & Clock Trades 1880 at 131, High Street.


Cattaneo.—On the 13th inst., at Saltburn-by-the-Sea, aged 26, Seraphin Austin, only surviving child of the late Seraphin and Eleanor Cattaneo, of Stockton-on-Tees.

Source: Yorkshire Gazette - 12th August 1882


Pursuant to a Judgment of the High Court of Justice, made in the matter of Seraphin Austin Cattaneo, deceased, and in an action J. S. Greenberg and Co. and E. D. Wilmot and Son, plaintiffs, against Emily Eastham, defendant, 1883, G., 1291, the creditors of Seraphin Austin Cattaneo, late of Stockton-on-Tees, in the county of Durham, Jeweller, who died on or about the 13th day of August, 1882, are, on or before the 17th day of December, 1883, to send by post, prepaid, to Messrs. Bainsbridge and Barnsley, of 24, Albert-road, Middlesborough, in the county of York, Solicitors of the defendant, Emily Eastham, the executrix of the deceased, their Christian, surnames, addresses, and descriptions, the full particulars of their claims and statement of their account, and the nature of the securities (if any) held by them, or in default they will he peremptorily excluded from the Benefit of the said Judgment. Every creditor holding any security is to produce the same before Mr. Registrar Parry, at his chambers, situate at the County Court, Corporation-street, Birmingham, in the county of Warwick, on Thursday, the 3rd day of January, 1884, at half-past two o'clock in the afternoon, being the time appointed for adjudicating on the claims.-Dated this 17th day of November, 1883.

Source: The London Gazette - 20th November 1883

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Re: The Newcastle and North of England Trade - Information, Advertisements, Examples

Postby dognose » Mon Jan 29, 2018 2:18 pm

COLLINGWOOD & SON Ltd.

Corner of Corporation and Linthorpe Roads, Middlesbrough, and Stockton-on-Tees, Darlington and Hartlepool


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Collingwood & Son - Middleborough - 1901


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Collingwood & Son Ltd. - Birmingham - 1936


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Collingwood & Son Ltd. - Birmingham - 1938

The business of Collingwood & Son traces its history back to the Clockmaker, Matthew Collingwood who was christened in Alnwick on April 10, 1796. Matthew married Mary Cramer on the 28th November 1819, at Alnwick and the couple had nine children, all born in Alnwick between 1821 and 1840. Two of Matthew’s sons, John (b.1822) and Matthew George (b.1827) were also noted as Watchmakers and Jewellers, as was a grandson, Horatio Nelson Collingwood.

It was Matthew George Collingwood that established the business at Middlesbrough in c.1886. The firm is thought to have continued in business until the 1960's.

Matthew George Collingwood was noted as Deputy Mayor of Middlesbrough in 1890.

An earlier address of the business was 5, Cleveland Terrace, Middlesbrough (1880).

The business was under sole ownership of Horatio Nelson Collingwood by 1896.

Collingwood & Son had additional branches at Newcastle (21, New Bridge Street, Newcastle-upon-Tyne), noted in 1899, 131, High Street, Stockton-on-Tees c.1905, and at Sunderland, noted in 1909.

The Hartlepool address in 1899 was recorded as 25, Church Street, West Hartlepool.

The firm were converted into a limited liability company on the 17th November 1909.

As Matthew George Collingwood & Son, they entered a mark 'MGC & S' contained within an oblong punch, with the London Assay Office on the 20th February 1899.

Collingwood & Son also used the services of the Chester Assay Office. Their first mark 'C & S' contained witin an oblong punch will clipped corners, was entered on the 25th April 1896. Their second mark 'MGC & S' contained within an oblong punch, was entered on the 25th February 1899, and a third mark 'M.G.C & S' contained within an oblong punch with a diamond shaped centre, on the 21st January 1902.

Collingwood & Son were at least the third jewellers and silversmiths, following Cattaneo & Son, then Edwin Cowley, to occupy 131, High Street, Stockton-on-Tees, but they were not the last, the premises later became a branch of Ratners.

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Re: The Newcastle and North of England Trade - Information, Advertisements, Examples

Postby dognose » Wed Jan 31, 2018 5:25 am

J.W. LIDDLE

8, Dundas Street, Saltburn-by-the-Sea


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J.W. Liddle, D.B.O.A. - Saltburn-by-the-Sea - 1901

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Re: The Newcastle and North of England Trade - Information, Advertisements, Examples

Postby dognose » Sat Feb 03, 2018 12:35 pm

HENRY ABBEY

4, South Street, South Cliff, Scarborough


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Henry Abbey - Scarborough - 1901

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Re: The Newcastle and North of England Trade - Information, Advertisements, Examples

Postby dognose » Tue Feb 06, 2018 2:35 pm

A.G. COCKBURN

29, St. Nicholas Street, Scarborough


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A.G. Cockburn - Scarborough - 1901

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Re: The Newcastle and North of England Trade - Information, Advertisements, Examples

Postby dognose » Fri Feb 09, 2018 4:58 am

T. KIRKNESS & SONS

2, Westborough and 14, Huntriss Row, Scarborough


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T. Kirkness & Sons - Scarborough - 1901


Notice is hereby given, that the Partnership heretofore subsisting between us the undersigned, Arthur Edward Kirkness and George Edgar Kirkness, carrying on business as Watchmakers and Jewellers, at 3, Westborough and 14, Huntriss-row, Scarborough, in the county of York, under the style or firm of T. Kirkness and Sons, has been dissolved, by mutual consent, as and from the 13th day of January, 1891. All debts due to and owing by the late firm will be received and paid by the said George Edgar Kirkness, who will continue to carry on the said business at 4, Westborough aforesaid, in partnership with his brother, Octavius Allen Kirkness, under the style or firm of T. Kirkness and Sons.-Dated this 28th day of August, 1891.
A. E. KIRKNESS.
G. EDGAR KIRKNESS.


Source: The London Gazette - 15th December 1891


In 1904, T. Kirkness & Sons supplied the clocks and ornaments for the new North Riding County Hall.

In 1907 the business appears to be in the hands of George Edgar Kirkness and Octavius Allen Kirkness.

The firm went into bankruptcy in 1908.

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Re: The Newcastle and North of England Trade - Information, Advertisements, Examples

Postby dognose » Mon Feb 12, 2018 8:33 am

GEORGE F. SMITH & SON

6 & 7, Westborough, Scarborough


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Geo. F. Smith & Son - Scarborough - 1901

Established in 1856.

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Re: The Newcastle and North of England Trade - Information, Advertisements, Examples

Postby dognose » Fri Feb 16, 2018 12:59 pm

ALBERT E. BULLEY

West Street, Filey


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Albert E. Bulley - Filey - 1901

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