The Newcastle and North of England Trade - Information, Advertisements, Examples

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The Newcastle and North of England Trade - Information, Advertisements, Examples

Postby dognose » Sat Nov 15, 2014 11:30 am

The Newcastle and North of England Trade - Information, Advertisements, Examples

A topic for recording any snippets of information regarding the silver trade in Newcastle and the north-east of England. If you have some details to share, then here's the place to post them.

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Re: The Newcastle Trade - Information, Advertisements, Examp

Postby dognose » Sat Nov 15, 2014 11:35 am

A listing of silversmiths and allied trades, extracted from a Newcastle trade directory of 1827.

Armstrong, Thomas…………..Gold Beater…………………………..Orchard Street
Armstrong, John……………....Gem & Seal Engraver…………..…..20, Dean Street
Ayre, Henry…………………...Watch & Clockmaker……...Bottle Bank, Gateshead
Baptist, George………………..Working Cutler………….5, St Nicholas Churchyard
Battersby, John………Surgical Instrument Maker & Cutler………...5, Groat Market
Bell, James……………………Jeweller & Silversmith………………10, Dean Street
Berwick, Thomas & Son………Engraver……………….16, St Nicholas Churchyard
Dinsdale, Christopher……….Goldsmith & Assaymaster…………….12, Dean Court
Duncan, Thomas……………….Clockmaker……………………………….…..Forth
Fallow Joseph………………..Clockmaker & Toy Dealer……….127, Pilgrim Street
Ferguson, Robert……………..Clock & Watchmaker…….…High Street, Gateshead
Fletcher, Thomas……………..Clock & Watchmaker……………….…….Ouseburn
Frame, George………………..Clock & Watchmaker……….Bottle Bank, Gateshead
Greaves, Thomas……………..Clock & Watchmaker………………….52, Quayside
Hamilton, James………………Working Jeweller…………………66, Pilgrim Street
Kirton, William……………….Watch & Clockmaker……….14, Collingwood Street
Lewis, George Samuel…….G/S, S/S, Jeweller & W/Maker.…….....6, Mosley Street
Lister, William……………..Goldsmith & Watchmaker………..…16, Mosely Street
Loraine, James…………………Watch & Clockmaker…………………..….96, Side
Macadam, James……………….Watch & Clockmaker…………………….103, Side
Nicholson, Isaac………………….Engraver………………..……..22, Mosely Street
Pearson, Thomas………………..Watch & Clockmaker…………..29, Groat Market
Potts, Robert………..Surgical Instrument Maker & Cutler……………Denton Chare
Poulutchey, Bernard & Co….Jeweller & Toy Dealer…………….182, Pilgrim Street
Reid, Christain Ker & Son…G/S, Silver Plate Man., & W/M……….12, Dean Street
Reid, David……………………….Goldsmith………………………Hanover Square
Rennison, William………………Watch & Clockmaker……….…..St. Annes Street
Robinson, Thomas…………Silversmith & Die Sinker…………..Oakwellgate Chare
Sessford, Joseph…………………Watch & Clockmaker………….10, Groat Market
Smith, Edward……………………Watchmaker……....Court 7, Old Butcher Market
Smith, John………………………Watch & Clockmaker………………..…..44, Side
Sommerville, Francis…..Working Goldsmith & Silversmith…5, Collingwood Street
Stuart, George. Senior……………Watch & Clockmaker..........16, Groat Market
Stuart, George. Junior…………….Watch & Clockmaker……….164, Pilgrim Street
Tinkler, Stracham…………………Watch & Clockmaker…………..St Marys Street
Trotter, Joseph……………………..Watch & Clockmaker……..….16, Broad Chare
Tweedy, William………..……Watch & Clockmaker….Blackgate, nr. Head of Side
Watson, Dorothy……………………Silver Burnisher…….Court 76, Newgate Street
Watson, Michael………………Watch & Clockmaker……....8, Old Butcher Market
Watson, Thomas……….Working G/S, S/S, & Jeweller……………………106, Side
Wheinell, James………………...Watch & Clockmaker…………………....22, Close
Wright, John………..…Jeweller, Silversmith, Watchmaker*……….32, Dean Street
Young, Richard…………………..Watchmaker………………..….13, Bigge Market

* John Wright is also noted as 'Agent for the Crown Life Assurance Co.'

Source: History, Directory, and Gazetteer of the Counties of Durham and Northumberland - W. Parson and W. White - 1827

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Re: The Newcastle Trade - Information, Advertisements, Examp

Postby dognose » Sat Nov 15, 2014 3:30 pm

The Arms of the Plumbers, Pewterers and Glaziers Companies with which the Newcastle goldsmiths were incorporated with until 1702, and associated with, until 1716:

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Re: The Newcastle Trade - Information, Advertisements, Examp

Postby dognose » Sun Nov 16, 2014 6:05 am

JOHN AIREY

48, Grainger Street, Newcastle


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John Airey - Newcastle - 1883


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Re: The Newcastle Trade - Information, Advertisements, Examp

Postby dognose » Tue Nov 18, 2014 4:56 am

The Newcastle Goldsmiths became an independent Company in 1702 as The Company of Goldsmiths of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, and an Act of Parliament in that same year received royal assent on the 30th March, re-establishing the Newcastle Assay Office.

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At their first official meeting on the 24th June 1702, the Company elected Francis Batty as the Assay-master, and Robert Shrives and Thomas Armstrong as the first Wardens of the Company.

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Re: The Newcastle Trade - Information, Advertisements, Examp

Postby dognose » Wed Nov 19, 2014 7:17 am

OLIVER YOUNG

27, Sandhill, Newcastle


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Young's Newcastle Watch Establishment - Newcastle - 1882


The capital watchmaker's and jeweller's shop at 27, Sand Hill, Newcastle-on-Tyne, fitted throughout by Sage, of London, and occupied for over twenty years by Mr. Oliver Young, is to let at a very moderate rent and good terms.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 5th March 1885

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Re: The Newcastle Trade - Information, Advertisements, Examp

Postby dognose » Thu Nov 20, 2014 3:44 pm

JOHN COOK

Rackett Court, 92, Newgate Street, Newcastle


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The maker is the rarely seen Newcastle silversmith John Cook. Cook's working period spanned eighteen years from 1832 until 1850, the top example was assayed in 1835 and the lower one in 1837. The records of the Newcastle Assay Office show the amount of silver that he submitted to assay was small indeed.

His submissions were as follows:

1832 = 211 oz.
1833 = 493 oz.
1834 = 272 oz.
1835 = 349 oz.
1836 = 323 oz.
1837 = 258 oz.
1838 = 95 oz.
1839 = 74 oz.
1840 = 69 oz.
1841 = 55 oz.
1842 = 44 oz.
1843 = 9 oz.
1844 = 21 oz.
1845 = 83 oz.
1846 = 0 oz.
1847 = 4 oz.
1848 = 36 oz.
1849 = 14 oz.
1850 = 3 oz.

John Cook's relationship with the assay office was not a happy one, it is noted in the records that between the 23rd November 1833 and the 27th May 1845 he had several batches of submissions broken by the assay office for being below standard.

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These spoons also show the improvement in the quality of the punches that were acquired by the Newcastle Company in July 1837 from the London engraver John Smith. Smith who was fast falling out of favour with the London Company (he was replaced by William Wyon in 1839), produced somewhat better examples than those previously used at Newcastle despite his failing eyesight.

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Re: The Newcastle Trade - Information, Advertisements, Examp

Postby dognose » Fri Nov 21, 2014 8:56 am

GEORGE BULLOCK

Suicide in Newcastle.–Mr. Theo. Hoyle, city coroner, held an inquest on the 17th ultimo, at the Stone Cellars Inn, St. Lawrence, Newcastle, on the body of George Bullock, silversmith, 57 years of age, who died in the jeweller's shop of Mr. Craig, 37, Dean Street, on the 10th ultimo. James Craig, son of Mr. R. M. Craig, jeweller, 37, Dean Street, deposed that deceased had been drinking very heavily for the past few weeks, and during the last two years witness had often heard him threaten to poison himself. On Monday morning deceased came to the shop under the influence of drink. He walked into the work rooms, where he was seen to tamper with some poisons. He was cautioned to let them alone, but whilst witness's attention was engaged at some work he swallowed a quantity of gilding solution, containing cyanide potassium, from the effects of which he quickly died. The jury returned a verdict that deceased poisoned himself whilst suffering from the effects of excessive drinking.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st January 1890

George Bullock was likely to have been a journeyman silversmith for all of his working life, and it would seem likely, due to the contents of the above report, that he was working for Robert Miller Craig at the time of his death. He did not enter a mark with the Newcastle Assay Office, but was recorded as a silversmith in the Baptismal records of his son at All Saints Church, Newcastle on the 21st July 1856. 'George Bullock, Pandon Bank, Silversmith' . He wife's name was noted as Jane.

37, Deane Street was the former premises of the silversmith, Thomas Sewell. Robert Miller Craig had occupied that address since c.1884.

Robert Miller Craig was the last person to have his work submitted to the Newcastle Assay Office. Thirty teaspoons were assayed on 22nd April 1884, and thirty gold rings assayed on 2nd May 1884. Robert Miller Craig then entered his mark 'RMC' with the Chester Assay Office on the 30th June 1884.

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Re: The Newcastle Trade - Information, Advertisements, Examp

Postby dognose » Sat Nov 22, 2014 8:30 am

G. KUSS & SONS

6, Northumberland Street, and, New Bridge Street, Newcastle


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G. Kuss & Sons - Newcastle - 1884


Notice is hereby given, that the business of Watchmakers and Jewellers heretofore carried on by the undersigned Joseph Kuss and William Kuss, at Number 6, Northumberland-street, in the city and county of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, under the style or firm of " G. Kuss and Sons," has as and from the 8th day of May, 1901, been sold to the undersigned, John Barnett Mennie, of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, who will alone as from the above mentioned date continue to carry on the same business under the old style or firm of " G. Kuss and Sons."–Dated this eighth day of July, 1901.

JOSEPH KUSS.
WILLIAM KUSS.
JOHN BARNETT MENNIE.


Source: The London Gazette - 16th July 1901

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Re: The Newcastle Trade - Information, Advertisements, Examp

Postby dognose » Mon Nov 24, 2014 10:29 am

WILLIAM MORLEY (MORALEY)

Newcastle


1762. January 19.–Buried, “ William Morley, Watchmaker.” (St. Nicholas Register.) This singular individual, whose real name was Moraley, was of good family and the heir to a considerable paternal estate, which was spent in reckless extravagance and eventually he had to make a living as a watchmaker in Newcastle :–He published in 1743, an account of various transactions, which had occurred to himself, previous to that year, under the title of “ The Unfortunate: or, the Voyage and Adventurers of William Moraley of Moraley in Northumberland, Gent.” The late Mr. J. R. Wilson, had a copy of this extremely scarce tract, which at his sale, was purchased by Mr. Thomas Bell, land-surveyor, a work abounding in extraordinary and romantic incidents, but which is understood to have been a faithful record of the circumstances of his early life.

Source: The Local Historian's Table Book: Of Remarkable Occurrences, Historical Facts, Traditions ... Connected with the Counties of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Northumberland and Durham - M.A. Richardson - 1841

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Re: The Newcastle Trade - Information, Advertisements, Examp

Postby dognose » Mon Nov 24, 2014 10:52 am

JOSEPH SWALLOW

Durham


Joseph Swallow, of Durham, jeweller, was tried at the assizes there, for drinking King James"s health–Local Papers.

Source: The Local Historian's Table Book: Of Remarkable Occurrences, Historical Facts, Traditions ... Connected with the Counties of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Northumberland and Durham - M.A. Richardson - 1841

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Re: The Newcastle Trade - Information, Advertisements, Examp

Postby dognose » Wed Dec 31, 2014 5:33 am

W. BURNETT

Jarrow-on-Tyne


People might do worse than take a wrinkle from Mr. W. Burnett, jeweller, Jarrow-on-Tyne, because he issues a monthly list of second-hand goods of all kinds, including watches, jewellery, silver plate, etc., etc., free of charge.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 5th March 1885

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Re: The Newcastle Trade - Information, Advertisements, Examp

Postby dognose » Sun Feb 01, 2015 6:35 am

EMMANUEL FRYDE

Sunderland


A County Court Point.–At the Hartlepool County Court last month, Nicholas Barrasford, pitman, of Castle Eden Colliery, sued Emmanuel Fryde, jeweller, of Sunderland, to recover £15, money overpaid to the defendant and damages sustained by an excessive levy in two executions. Mr. Wilson appeared for the plaintiff, and Mr. Fryde, jun., for his father. It appeared that in 1883 defendant sold a watch to the plaintiff for £6 10s., to be paid for by instalments, which being irregularly kept up, the defendant sued for the balance in 1884 at the Durham County Court, judgment being given in his favour for 4s. per month. Instead, however, of paying the money into court, the plaintiff paid it to the defendant, and the latter accepted it ; but upon the lapse of the payments on the proper dates he issued an execution, but nothing was realised from it, though the costs incurred amounted to £3. A year later a second execution was issued, and £5 realised, leaving, according to Mr. Fryde's version, a balance of £3 or £4 still due. Plaintiff's contention was that he had overpaid the debt, and that the levy was excessive. The books of the County Court were produced, and his Honour (Judge Meynell), after a careful perusal, found that the balance due to the defendant was not so large as he alleged, and although his verdict was for the defendant, he considered that by accepting the money instead of allowing it to pass through the court by the proper channel, defendant had practically caused the action. Costs would, therefore, be disallowed.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 2nd June 1890

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Re: The Newcastle Trade - Information, Advertisements, Examp

Postby dognose » Thu Feb 26, 2015 1:40 pm

ROBERT WHITE

Bigg Market, Newcastle


Judge Greenwell, in Newcastle County Court, gave judgment in an action on August 26, in which an electrician claimed £25 as balance of contract price for electrical work from a builder, the said work having been carried out on premises the builder was building in 1903, in the Bigg Market, Newcastle, for Mr. Robert White, wholesale jeweller. The contention was that this payment should be made by the building owner and not by the contractor. His Honour found that the architect employed' the plaintiff as agent of the contractor, and not as agent of the building owner. He found that the contractor had received from the building owner the whole of the money to which he was entitled, and that that included the money due to the plaintiff. He gave judgment for the plaintiff with costs.

Source: The British Architect - 2nd September 1904

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Re: The Newcastle Trade - Information, Advertisements, Examples

Postby dognose » Thu Jun 25, 2015 12:18 pm

The Exhibition Of Plate Bearing The Hall-Marks Of The Newcastle Goldsmiths' Company

[NOTE.—The recent exhibition of Newcastle plate was so successful in every way that we hope it may be followed in other localities by similar exhibitions of provincial plate. We have thought it well to give a detailed account of it in our pages, and for this purpose we venture to borrow verbatim the excellent report which appeared in the "Newcastle Chronicle" of May 20 and 21.]

"Widespread interest is being taken in all parts of the North of England in the exhibition of Newcastle plate held under the auspices of the Newcastle Society of Antiquaries, which was opened to the public yesterday, in the Black Gate Museum. There are in the collection exhibited over 300 separate pieces of plate, each possessing, in the eyes of the antiquary, intrinsically an interesting history, and many having, beyond this, a record of ownership or manufacture even more pregnant with human interest. But beyond this, the exhibition possesses a general interest from an aesthetic and artistic point of view. If only as an elevator of public taste, the exhibition of to day, tomorrow, and the next day, should be deemed a valuable means of instruction. The philosophy of the exhibition, indeed, is the feature likely to have the most widely extended results, at a time when so many shop windows and domestic side-boards are filled with meretricious electro plate, flashy and over-ornate. Silver and gold, from their intrinsic value as precious metals, call upon those who work in them to exercise the most economy in using them, and to effect this a special mode of construction is resorted to, widely different from the principles observed by those who work in the common materials of clay or glass. The precious metals are at all times worthy materials for the manufacture of works of art, and, in view of their great durability, it is of the highest importance that the objects created should be well considered both as to the utility of their design and the beauty of their form. The principal danger which besets the products of the goldsmith's and silversmith's art is the temptation which many rightful owners have of consigning them to the melting-pot, and the attraction, in the direction of unlawful possession, which they provide for the thief. To this may be attributed the increasingly great popularity which cheaper and consequently less artistic productions in electro-plate now enjoy. In view of the greater longevity of articles fashioned out of solid metal, it becomes of the highest importance to impart to them beauty and dignity of form, richness of design, intricacy and delicacy of cunning detail, and a general refinement of effect, so that they may long be considered with admiration and be repeatedly enjoyed by all who behold or use them. The defect of modern plate is chiefly its shoddy character and the subordination of utility of construction to florid ornamentation. This is commonly seen in silver and gold vessels bearing handles or spouts, and it is curious how rarely such vessels are designed as they should be. A pound weight is easily lifted, but when applied to the shorter end of the steelyard it will balance a hundred-weight. If this principle is applied to a teapot which actually weighs but little, the teapot may yet be very heavy to lift, and in nineteen cases out of twenty silver jugs and teapots are so designed that they are in practice lifted only by a force that would be capable of raising two or three such vessels if only the principle of the steelyard was not acting against the person using the vessel. Another common error is noticeable in many vases and similar vessels covered with figures in high relief, the groups of which do not follow the line of the vase, but appear as irregular projections from it. If figures or other ornaments are beaten up on the surface of a vessel, they should not be allowed to destroy or mar its general contour. These are but a few of the considerations which become prominent in comparing the art of the silversmith of the present day, directed to meet the modern taste for the maximum of show with the minimum of substantiality, with the more solid and artistic workmanship which prevailed in the time of our forefathers of the last century. The present exhibition, however, is one exclusively of Newcastle plate, from the earliest date up to the year 1800, and thus several important offers by collectors to lend for exhibition examples of old plate otherwise extremely interesting have had to be declined. But Newcastle was so long an office for assaying and hall marking plate that even of its own products there exist so many and so handsome specimens that it is probably all the better and more useful in purpose that the restriction of the exhibits to locally marked plate was made.

"We may supplement our remarks last week on one of the greatest makers of Newcastle plate during the last century, Isaac Cookson, to wit, by some further interesting details. It has commonly been supposed, even by members of this particular family, that the Cooksons of Whitehill and Meldon, who during the present century have been one of our best known Northumbrian and Durham county families were the direct descendants of Isaac Cookson, the Newcastle goldsmith. Researches, carried out during the preparations for the present exhibition, and now first set out in print, have shown accidentally and somewhat unexpectedly that such was not the case, but that they were descended from another branch of the same family. The Cooksons of Meldon are directly descended from the Cooksons of Penrith, who were the ancestors in the female line of Wordsworth the poet. One of the arguments in support of this is furnished by Mr. George Watson, of Penrith, who, in a paper on 'Nolabilia of Old Penrith,' finds in the registers of the old Cumbrian town the regular recurrence of established families of Cooksons in 1639. There were, however, Cooksons in Penrith forty years before, as the following entries show: '1597. Janet, wife of William Cookson, buried: 1599, William Cookson and Elizabeth Cookson married ; and 1600, William Cookson, buried.' Mr. Watson thinks that this William Cookson was the father of the three Cooksons, William, Lancelot, and Anthony, who appear, in 1639, to have been established in the town. Between 1639 and 1742 no fewer than sixteen William Cooksons appear in the registers as fathers of families. In the middle and latter part of the last century there were two William Cooksons, first cousins, and both leading townsmen of Penrith, one a grocer, the other a mercer. The latter was the maternal grandfather of William Wordsworth, the Poet Laureate (and was also a grandson of the William Cookson who married Alice). William, the grocer, was a son of William Cookson, the eldest son of William and Alice Cookson, and was a nephew of Isaac Cookson, the merchant, of Newcastle.

"Much has been written, and much suggested, as to the identity of Isaac Cookson, the well known Newcastle silversmith, and it has proved somewhat difficult and involved much careful research to establish beyond reasonable doubt that some of the conclusions hitherto arrived at are erroneous, and that, though a connection, he was only collaterally a connection of the Cooksons of Whitehill and Meldon. The following facts have all been verified, in most instances by direct reference to original documents. Let us go back to the grandfather of William, the grocer, who was William Cookson of Penrith, who died in 1712. His wife was named Alice, and he had several sons and daughters; but, for the present purpose, it is necessary to refer to only two of them. Their eldest son was William, baptized in 1668, and their second son Isaac, baptized in 1679, who was a merchant in Newcastle. The eldest of these two brothers, William Cookson the younger, married Esther, and by her had, with other children, a son Isaac, baptized August 30,1705. His wife died the following month, and he married secondly Susannah. It was this son Isaac who was the Newcastle silversmith.

"Isaac, the merchant, son of William the elder, settled in Newcastle, and married Hannah Helton, by whom he had a son named John. This Isaac died in 1744, and his widow Hannah died in 1760, the remains of husband and wife being interred in St. Nicholas's Church. This Isaac, the merchant, purchased considerable property in Newcastle and erected a spacious mansion, and was succeeded by his son John, believed to be an only child. The latter in 1745 purchased the estate of Whitehill, near Chester-le-Street, marrying Elizabeth, eldest daughter and co-heir of Thomas Ludwige, of Whitehaven, and having issue (among others) Isaac Cookson, of Whitehill. This latter had seven sons, including John, of Whitehill ; James, colonel in the army; and Isaac, of Meldon Park. William Cookson the elder, who died in 1712, in his will, proved at Carlisle in that year, refers to all his children, and by it he bequeaths, inter alia, to his 'son Isaac Cookson, living at Newcastle-on-Tyne,' five pounds to buy a ring, and one pound to his wife, Hannah, for the like purpose. This clearly identifies Isaac the merchant who married Hannah Belton.

"The books of the Newcastle Goldsmiths' Company show only one Isaac Cookson as a member of that guild, and indicate that in 1720 Isaac Cookson, son of William Cookson of Penrith, gentleman, was bound an apprentice to Francis Batty, silversmith, paying the unusually large apprenticeship fee of £35, while in 1727-28 Isaac Cookson was made free of the guild. On May 23, 1734, Isaac Cookson, of Newcastle, silversmith, married Susannah Gilpin—this connecting him with the Gilpin family, the great Puritan preacher of Newcastle, formerly Presbyterian Rector of Greystoke, being their ancestor—at Trinity Church, Whitehaven, and in 1737 Esther, their only child, was born, Susannah being buried at St. Nicholas' on May 10, 1746, while her husband was buried at the same church on August 22, 1754. The next month, at York, letters of administration were granted to William Bowes, who was appointed curator of Esther Cookson, the only daughter and sole next-of-kin of Isaac Cookson, of Newcastle, the silversmith. No plate has ever been found with Isaac Cookson's mark dated before 1728 or after 1754-57. After his death the business was carried on by John Langlands, his former apprentice and journeyman; and in 1758 Esther Cookson, having attained her majority, took out letters of administration de bonis non of the estate of her father as daughter and sole next-of-kin. Isaac Cookson, the silversmith, therefore, who died without male heir, seems clearly to have been the nephew of the Isaac Cookson, the merchant, who was the ancestor of the Cooksons of Whitehill and Meldon. William Cookson, the father of the silversmith, is described as a brazier, but in his son's indentures as a gentleman; it appears that, although a brazier by trade, he had attained a considerable position, for he was also concerned in coal and iron works, being, with his father and brother, a pioneer in the iron trade of Cumberland and Tyneside.

"The Black Gate Museum, yesterday, was visited by an eager and greatly interested throng of ladies and gentlemen for the purpose of inspecting the large and varied collection brought together from all parts of the North of England, and it soon became obvious that all the requirements of the promoters had been satisfied, for, while they had an excellent collection of varied examples of the work of as many as possible of the Newcastle Guild of Goldsmiths, they had also succeeded in awakening a surprising degree of interest in the general public. From an antiquarian standpoint the success of the exhibition has been complete, for nearly all the working silversmiths of Newcastle up to the close of the eighteenth century are represented by examples, and many of the better-known makers in a large way of business are abundantly in evidence through their work. Every separate piece is adequately and succinctly described by means of a card containing the name of the maker, the period in which he flourished, and the actual or probable date of the plate, as well as the exhibitor's name. But beyond these particulars the pieces themselves often bear curious inscriptions, interesting monograms or coats of arms, or other features of peculiarity whereby may hang an interesting tale. Probably the first thing to strike an observer would be the fact that, of the 360 pieces of plate shown, more than one-third is ecclesiastical in character, while another striking trait of the exhibits is the predominance of the names of the great makers, and these only of a comparatively recent date. Though the Newcastle Goldsmiths' Guild existed early in the fifteenth century, none of the plate which they made is known to have come down to us, and the earliest known piece of Newcastle plate—at any rate, the oldest in the collection on exhibition—is the portion of Communion plate from Ryton Church (consisting of cup and paten), dated 1664, the work of John Wilkinson. Other plate may be older, but is dateless; this is the oldest known which bears a date mark. Very few other specimens bearing John Wilkinson's mark are believed to be in existence. The most frequent name attached to the seventeenth-century plate exhibited is that of William Ramsey, who worked from about 1656 to 1702, and whose mark appears upon a great quantity of ecclesiastical plate. An exceptionally interesting sample of his work in the exhibition is the large flagon from Sawley Church, near Ripon, which apparently formed part of the Corporation plate of Newcastle. At any rate, it is embellished with the arms of the town, and bears the date mark 1670, and has engraved upon it the name of Thomas Davison, mayor. But it also bears the inscription: 'The gift of Edward Norton, Esq., Mr Philip Lauder, Mr. William Kay, and ye Revd. Thomas Kay to ye Chapel of Sawley, 1756.' This was nearly a hundred years before the Newcastle Mansion House sale, and it is a puzzle even to the experts how it came to be transferred from the custody of the Corporation to its present ecclesiastical owners. An interesting bit of local history must attach to the flagon if it could be known. Further fine examples of William Ramsey's work are to be seen in the loans of church plate from St. Nicholas' (Newcastle), St. John's (Newcastle), Durham, Boldon, and Rose Castle Chapel, Cumberland. Much of the secular plate on exhibition also bears his mark. Two handsome flagons from St. Mary's, Gateshead, bear the mark of another prominent seventeenth-century goldsmith, John Dowthwaite.

"The local clergy have responded most heartily to the committee's invitation to lend their church plate, and so this section is exceptionally complete, embracing examples of all dates from the earliest known to the end of the last century, fine contributions having been received from St. Nicholas', All Saints', St. Ann's, St. John's, Newcastle, St. Mary's, Gateshead, and other churches in the district. In the secular section the most notable contribution is that of Mr. Thomas Taylor, of Chipchase Castle, who has sent a very fine collection from his large store of old plate, including some pieces of very early secular plate. Probably the two most handsome of these are a parcel gilt tankard on three ball feet by William Ramsey, circa 1670, and a loving cup and cover by John Langlands, 1769. Mr. Taylors nearest competitor amongst the collectors is Mr. L. W. Adamson; while Mr. J. R. Carr-Ellison, Miss Reed (of Old Town), Major Widdrington, Mr. W. Ord (of Nunnykirk), Miss Allgood (of the Hermitage, Hexham), and others also contribute rare and handsome pieces of plate, and not the least interesting section of the exhibition are the massive pieces lent by the various guilds in the North of England." — Newcastle Chronicle, May 20.


Continuing the report on the following day, the writer says: "Yesterday, the exhibition of old Newcastle plate, held in the Black Gate Museum, Newcastle, under the auspices of the Newcastle Society of Antiquaries, was visited by many collectors and other interested ladies and gentlemen. It must have struck many who have seen the handsome collection there gathered together from many parts of the North of England that almost the only pieces of Newcastle Corporation plate exhibited have been lent, not by the Corporation, but by the vicar and wardens of Sawley Church, near Ripon (who possess in a fine flagon the oldest example extant of Newcastle plate), by Mrs. Aubone Potter, who showed two butter boats, and by Mrs. Demay, her sister, who showed a similar piece. The old Corporation of Newcastle had at the beginning of this century a very fine collection of plate, much of which was of Newcastle make, but at the time when the new Newcastle Town Council, under the provisions of the Municipal Corporation Reform Act, came into office, some eighteen months before the beginning of the Queen's reign, all the old Corporation plate was sold and dispersed to various parts of the country, an act of utter vandalism from an antiquarian standpoint, so that, although they retain a few relics of their ancient grand stock of silver, the present Corporation of the city do not possess one single piece of very old plate that was made by a Newcastle silversmith. Dr. L. W. Adamson was another exhibitor of silver formerly belonging to the Corporation in the shape of a number of spoons and dessert-forks. The same gentleman showed a series of engraved spoons by various makers illustrative of the work of the early part of last century.

"After the church plate, the largest feature of the exhibition—which, by the way, closes today—the old guild plate is the most important section, and almost the finest tankard shown is one belonging to the Tanners' Company of Newcastle; it is the work of John Ramsey, jun., bears the date of 1721, and has engraved upon it the arms of the company and the names of the stewards for 1723. The Drapers' Company of Durham show a wine-cup by John Dowthwaite, dated 1671, and a very fine tankard of about the year 1700 by Eli Bilton. The Carlisle Tanners' Company have a tankard by John Ramsey, given to the guild by the Bishop of Carlisle in 1701, and this is one of the few pieces made when no one had a right to mark plate in Newcastle, so that, while bearing the maker's mark, it does not show the Newcastle assay mark. Mr. Thomas Taylor, of Chipchase, occupies a case all to himself with a choice selection from his large and valuable collection. This includes an old wine-cup by John Wilkinson, dated circa 1664; a small porringer with Chinese decoration, by Abraham Hamer, circa 1690; a fluted porringer, by Eli Bilton, circa 1696; a fine old cleft-ended spoon by William Ramsey, circa 1686 ; and an unusually fine flagon by Jonathan French, 1721, as well as a handsome pair of sugar-castors and a pair of beautifully-worked rosewater ewers. The coffee-pots are a most attractive and interesting feature of the show, Major Widdrington, Miss Reed (of Old Town), Mr. James Dand, and Mr. John Watson being exhibitors. Dr. L. W. Adamson shows a fine double-handed cup and a cover by Thomas Partis, 1721, and an octagonal-shaped teapot and stand by Langland and Robertson ; while other handsome tea-kettles include two of Mr. Carr Ellison's made by Isaac Cookson, one dated 1732 and the other 1751, showing a marked difference of style. Mr. Ord, of Nunnykirk, has lent a very fine sauceboat, with a dragon's head for a handle and lions' heads for feet, made by Isaac Cookson in 1746. Miss Allgood, The Hermitage, shows two candlesticks by John Langlands, circa 1760, the only pair of candlesticks of old Newcastle make met with in the exhibition. The successful exhibition has highly pleased the antiquaries who promoted it, and interested large numbers of visitors from all parts of the district, while it has certainly increased the zest of collectors for old Newcastle plate.

"Perhaps it will be useful to give here a chronological list of Newcastle goldsmiths from the earliest time for which examples are known to exist up to 1800, which is the most recent date of works comprised in the exhibition: William Ramsey, 1656-98; John Wilkinson, 1658 to circa 1670; John Dowthwaite, 1666-73; Francis Batty, sen., 1674-1707; Eli Bilton, 1683-1712; Robert Shrive, 1694 to circa 1702; Thomas Hewitson, 1697 - 1717; Abraham Hamer, circa 1690; John Ramsey, 1698-1707; Richard Hobbs, 1702-18; Jonathan French, 1703-32; John Younghusband, 1706-18; Francis Batty, jun., 1708-28; James Kirkup, 1713-52; John Carnaby, 1718-33; Robert Makepeace, 1718-55 ; John Ramsey, jun., 1720-28; William Dalton, 1724-67; George Bulman, 1725-43; Isaac Cookson, 1728-54; Thomas Makepeace, 1729-38; John Kirkup, 1753-74; Langlands and Goodrick, 1754-56 ; John Langlands alone, 1756-78; Langlands and Robertson, 1778-93; James Crawford, 1763-95; Samuel James, 1763 65; David Crawford, 1763-95; John Jobson, 1771-76; James Hetherington, 1772-82 ; Stalker and Mitchison, 1774-84 ; John Mitchison, 1784-92; Pinkney and Scott, 1779-90; Christian Reid, 1791-1800 and on; Thomas Watson, 1793-1800 and on ; John Langlands, jun., 1793-1804; and John Robertson, 1796-1801. The following goldsmiths living in other towns assayed plate at Newcastle: Thomas Partis, Sunderland, 1720-26; William Partis, ditto, 1735-59; William Beilby, Durham, 1739-61 ; Samuel Thompson, ditto, 1750-85; and Anthony Hedley, ditto, 1789-1800 and on. Isaac Cookson, John Langland, and Langland and Robertson were the largest makers of Newcastle plate of their day, and consequently a greater quantity of their plate remains to us, so that very many of the specimens exhibited are their work. There are fewer examples of the other makers shown, but altogether the collection is a most comprehensive and interesting one, as it is one well illustrating the progress and development of the craft in Newcastle. —Newcastle Chronicle, May 21.


Source: The Antiquary - July 1897

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Re: The Newcastle Trade - Information, Advertisements, Examples

Postby dognose » Tue Aug 18, 2015 5:18 am

NEWCASTLE-UPON-TYNE

CONSUMPTION AND TRADE

The consumption of such goods in this consular district can not very well be given, but silverware and plated ware are universally used here, both in private houses and hotels, and I should say the consumption is very large.

These goods are not manufactured in this district, but are exclusively manufactured in Sheffield and Birmingham.

IMPORTS

There are no imports from foreign countries or from the United States. Watches, clocks, timepieces, etc., are, however, extensively imported from the United States and Germany.

OPENING FOR AMERICAN WARE

I do not know of any obstacles as to the extension of American trade in this line, and would suggest that American manufacturers should either establish branch wholesale houses here, or send smart travelers, with samples, to call on the dealers.

DEALERS

I give a list of the silversmiths in Newcastle, which may be useful:

Davison & Son, 80 Grey street.
J. Dick & Co., 10 Grainger street West.
Forrester & Co., 19 Grainger street.
Kuss & Sons, 6 Northumberland street.
W. Lister & Sons, 9 Grey street.
Marks & Sons, 38 Grainger street,
G. Parkin, 27 Sandhill.
Reid & Sons, 41 Grey street.
Street & Co., Limited, 87 Westgate road.
J. Wilson, 55 Grey street.
Bunn & Co., 19 Mosley street.
Elkington & Co., Limited, 22 Blackett street.
J. Hume, 40 Side.
Kuss & Co., 12 Collingwood street.
Barton & Co., Limited, Clayton street West.
Northern Goldsmiths and Silversmiths' Co., 1 Blackett street.
C. S. Proctor, 20 Grey street.
H. Samuel, 2 Grainger street West.
Walker & Hall, 60 Grey street.
M. Young & Sons, 57 Newgate street.

Horace W. Metcalf, Consul. Newcastle-upon-tyne, February 18, 1902.


Source: United States Congressional Serial Set - 1902

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Re: The Newcastle Trade - Information, Advertisements, Examples

Postby dognose » Fri Aug 28, 2015 8:40 am

A LISTING OF NEWCASTLE-UPON-TYNE CLOCKMAKERS

Craig, John, Pilgrim Street (1820)
Fallow & Kromer, 34 Mosley Street (1820)
Fletcher, Thomas, Ballast Hill (1820)
Frames, George, New Street, Gateshead (1820)
Greaves, Thomas, Quay Side (1820)
Laidlow, Thomas, High Bridge (1820)
Lamb, Thomas, High Friar Street (1820)
Lister, William, 33 Mosley Street (1820)
Loraine, James, Side (1820)
Marshall, John, High Bridge (1820)
Sessford, Joseph, Groat Market (1820)
Smith, John, Head of the Side (1820)
Smith, Thomas, Quayside (1820)
Stuart, George, 13 Groat Market (1820)
Tinkler, Strachan, Sandgate (1820)
Trotter, Joseph, Broad Chare( 1820)
Watson, Michael, Old Butcher Market (1820)
Tickle, William (1740)
Travis, T. (1710)
Barr, Fedel, 21 Groat Market (1836)
Broadbelt, George, 27 Church Street (1836)
Donald, James, 34 Mosley Street (1836)
Fallow, Jos., 4 Northumberland Street (1836)
Fallow, Martin, 73 Pilgrim Street (1836)
Forster, John, 20 High Bridge (1836)
Frame, George, Church Street, Gateshead (1836)
Kirton, William, 14 Colingwood Street (1836)
Lewis, George Samuel, 6 Mosley Street (1836)
Lister, William, 16 Mosley Street (1836)
Long, Theodore, 3 Bridge, Gateshead (1836)
Loraine, James, Felling Shore (1836)
Maughan, Joseph Heppell, Bottle Bank, Gateshead (1836)
Reid & Sons, 12 Dean Street (1836)
Rennison, William, St Ann's Street (1836)
Robeson, William, 52 Quayside (1836)
Robson, James, Fenkle Street (1836)
Sessford, Joseph, 10 Groat Market (1836)
Sharp, John, Byker Hill (1836)
Smith, Edward, Pilgrim Street (1836)
Smith, John, 44 Head of the Side (1836)
Stuart, George, 82 Westgate Street (1836)
Tinkler, Nicholas, St Ann's Street (1836)
Trotter, Joseph, 16 Broad Chare (1836)
Tweedy, William, 67 Head of the Side (1836)
Watson, Robert, Cloth Market (1836)
Watson, Thomas, 106 Side (1836)
Whitnall, James, 28 Close (1836)
Wilier, Henry, Castle Garth (1836)
Young, Mark, 13 Bigg Market (1836)

Source: Old Scottish clockmakers from 1453 to 1850 - John Smith - 1921

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Re: The Newcastle Trade - Information, Advertisements, Examples

Postby dognose » Fri Aug 28, 2015 9:33 am

A LISTING OF OTHER NORTHERN CLOCKMAKERS

NORTH SHIELDS (1820)
Blackwood, William, Union Street
Brown, William, Low Street
Coulson, William, Low Street
Gibson, George, Union Street
Howgarth, John, Stevenson Street
Robson, William, Low Street

PENRITH (1820)
Peacock, John, Little Docray
Posthouse, William, Docray
Rawson, John, Market Place
Roper, Martin, Little Docray
Wilkinson, Joseph, Castlegate

SOUTH SHIELDS (1820)
Burton, William, Fairies Street
Fenwick, John, Long Row
Gallon, William, East Holborn
Stockton, George, Long Row

SUNDERLAND (1820)
Airey, Smith, High Street
Arlot, William, Bodlewell-la
Atkin, John, High Street
Cockburn, William, High Street
Dodds, Moses, Mark Quay
Grawland, Clement, High Street*
Hills, Ralph, High Street
Nesbitt, George, High Street
Parton, William, Mark Quay
Taylor, G. R., High Street

WHITEHAVEN (1820)
Crabb, James, 44 Strand Street
Dawes, John, 8 Roper Street
Jackson, William, 50 King Street
Muncaster, William,11 Hamilton Lane
Pearson, John, 20 Church Street
Thompson, Joseph, 8 Duke Street

WIGTON (1820)
Howe, John, High Street
Musgrave, Richard, Coupland Square
Simpson, John, Allonby Road
Telford, John, High Street

WORKINGTON (1820)
Simpson, Daniel, Finkle Street
Walker, Joseph, Wilson Street
Wood, Robert, Market Place

Source: Old Scottish clockmakers from 1453 to 1850 - John Smith - 1921

* Clement Gowland

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Re: The Newcastle Trade - Information, Advertisements, Examples

Postby dognose » Sun Aug 30, 2015 3:19 pm

JOHN WRIGHT

Moseley Street, Newcastle-upon-Tyne


Whitehall, August 11, 1831

Whereas it hath been humbly represented - unto the King, that, between the night of Saturday the 30th July last and the morning of Monday the 1st instant, the shop of Mr. John Wright, jeweller, in Moseley-street, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, was broken and entered, and a large quantity of plate and jewellery, consisting of gold and silver watches, diamond, pearl, and other rings, and a variety of other articles, were stolen and carried away; His Majesty, for the better apprehending and bringing to justice the persons concerned in the said felony, is hereby pleased to promise His most gracious pardon to any one of them who shall discover his accomplice or accomplices therein, so that he, she, or they may be apprehended and convicted thereof.

MELBOURNE

And, as a further encouragement, a reward of FIFTY POUNDS is hereby offered by the said John Wright, to any person who shall discover the said offender or offenders, so that he, she, or they may be apprehended and convicted of the said offence.


Source: The London Gazette - 23rd August 1831

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Re: The Newcastle Trade - Information, Advertisements, Examples

Postby dognose » Sat Sep 12, 2015 4:50 am

CRESCENTIA TRITSCHLER

2, Athenaeum Street, and 16, Churchill Street, Sunderland


Bills of Sale

Tritschler, Crescentia (spinster), 2, Athenaeum-street, and 16, Churchill-street, Sunderland, jeweler and fancy dealer. Trustee : Robert A. Brown, C.A., Sunderland. Filed June 1: liabilities, £123 13s. Id. ; assets, £100.


Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st July 1891

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