The Jet Industry

For information you'd like to share - Post it here - not for questions
dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40650
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Jet Industry

Postby dognose » Mon Dec 01, 2014 7:54 am

WHITBY JET COMPANY


At the West London Police Court, Robert Mendon, of Kensington, has been charged with obtaining jewelry to the value of £38 10s. from Rudolph Warner, a traveller in the employ of the Whitby Jet Company, by false pretences. The case was that the prisoner received the goods from the prosecutor, and stated that he would pay for them at the end of the month, saying that he was of good position but could not at the time settle up. Prosecutor got two names as references from him, but found they did not give statements that were commercially satisfactory about the prisoner, who would neither pay or give up the goods. The present proceedings were then instituted. Prisoner's counsel now said that his client was prepared to give up the jewelry, whereupon the magistrate discharged him.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st August 1891

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40650
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Jet Industry

Postby dognose » Fri Dec 05, 2014 7:17 am

CHARLES HUGH GRIFFITH(S)

9-11, Bland's Cliff, and 30, Newborough Street, Scarborough


ADJUDICATIONS
Debtor's Name: Griffiths, Charles Hugh, 9 and 11, Bland's-cliff and 30, Newborough- street, Scarborough, Yorkshire, Jet Ornament Manufacturer and Dealer in Fancy Goods. Court: Scarborough. 9 of 1892. Date of Order: Mar. 16, 1892. Date of Petition: Mar. 7, 1892


Source: The London Gazette - 22nd March 1892


Notices to Creditors
Griffith. Charles Hugh, Jet Ornament Manufacturer, 9 and 11, Bland's Cliff, and 30, Newborough Street, Scarborough. Dividend of Is. 5½d. at Official Receiver's, Scarborough, Oct. 14.


Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st November 1892

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40650
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Jet Industry

Postby dognose » Thu Jan 08, 2015 6:08 am

JET

A Special correspondent of a contemporary having recently paid a visit to the Yorkshire Jet Holes in the neighbourhood of Whitby gives, in the following article, some particulars which will be perused with interest by many of our readers :–

This is not a learned essay on that bituminous mineral which takes its name from the small town anciently called Gages, on the river Lycia, from the banks of which it was originally obtained ; no wading through the modulations which transformed the word " gagates " into " jet " ; not a scientific disquisition as to the various forms of " black amber" found all over the world ; but just the plain story of a visit to the " Holes " in the rugged cliffs of our Yorkshire coast, whence comes our now neglected Whitby jet.

While enjoying 'dolce far niente' near the picturesque little fishing village of Staithes, some six or eight miles north of Whitby, I struck up an acquaintance with a Cleveland ironstone miner "out of work," a rough, honest Yorkshireman as one could wish to meet. In course of conversation, David–that was his name–told me how the mining trade was in a state of complete stagnation, and such of the miners as had not left the district were obliged to try their luck at the jet holes.

My curiosity was aroused. I soon learnt that the owners of the cliff land gave free permission to anyone who cared to dig for jet, claiming as a recompense one third of all the diggers might be fortunate enough to find. Also, I heard that the oft-disputed factor of luck held undoubted sway over the labours of these men ; some having worked, day after day, for months, making great caverns in the cliff, some 20 or 30 yards deep, without one ounce of jet as their reward. Others had struck a vein which yielded £200 to £300 worth in a week.

Very little persuasion was needed to induce my friend to take me round to some of these jet holes. He merely warned me that I should find the journey "a goodish bit tougher than I bargained for." He was right. My costume was hardly suitable for clambering along the side of jagged cliffs. Missing my fickle foothold meant certain death, for which I was not prepared. For half an hour, midway between the sea level and the summit of the cliffs, with eighty feet of perpendicular rock above and beneath us, we crept along, clinging to any projecting point and stepping from ledge to ledge, while the sea birds flew away in flocks, angrily and noisily resenting our approach. At length, within the bowels of the earth, we heard the regular heavy thud of a pick-axe, and having with difficulty rounded a promontory, we saw an opening in the cliff, about 7ft. in diameter, which crowned a sloping mass of shale. This shale had been displaced by the excavation, and formed a huge semi-cone with its base far below in the sea.

" So this is a veritable jet hole," said I. " Well, it's a hole," replied David, " but as for jet, I've never heeard o' none bein' fund, thof Owd Abram's worked at it nigh on a year." In response to David's " Hillo ! " " Owd Abram " appeared, pick in hand, and, after the usual introductory ceremony, I was conducted over the " hole." More than 30 yards into the solid rock had this old mole penetrated, not to mention numerous shoots from the main stem ; and beyond keeping to the blue shale, his only guides as to direction were fancy, presentment, or caprice. Luck was the only science on which this unfortunate digger depended. Day after day he had toiled with pick and spade ; occasionally doing a little blasting, sometimes having his progress impeded by huge masses of hard stone–" doggers " in the vernacular. Some of these weighed as much as 30 tons, and must be broken up before they can be removed ; and as yet his industry had not been rewarded by one single ounce of jet. When we left " Owd Abram's " claim he was drilling, previous to blasting up a portion of his flooring at the extreme limit of his cutting. " Happen I'll drop across it this time," said he, cheerily. Truly " hope springs eternal." It is needed in the rugged breasts of unsuccessful jet-diggers.

Only a few yards further along the face of the cliff we encountered Robert Bagshaw–" Lucky Baggs," he is called who was sitting in the sun like a great sandy rabbit at the entrance to his hole. This man had struck a big seam only a little time before our visit, and now had a coal-cellar, a pig-stye, and half his cottage kitchen filled with huge lumps of jet awaiting a travelling purchaser. We wished to see some in the rock, just as it was found, but were informed that none was now visible. " If we cared to wait," said " Lucky Baggs," till he was through with his " bit of baccy," he was going to blast a "dogger " down, and he might drop across some then. We did wait. We witnessed the process of blasting, and we did see some jet in its natural bed, for this favourite of fortune actually dropped across another vein, the magnitude of which of course we did not stop to ascertain. What we saw looked like an irregular layer, varying from one to six inches in thickness, of such a shape and form as to leave no doubt that it had once been the wood of some tree or plant. The diggers, however insist that jet is fossilised blood. Their probable reason for this is the ruddy appearance it presents when roughly cut or filed. Having seen the dark and the bright sides of jet hunting, and armed with some fragments generously bestowed by " Lucky Baggs," we made our way back to " Owd Abram's " claim, there secretly dropping a piece or two of jet in the hope that their discovery might cheer his old heart and stimulate him to further and, happily, more successful exertions.

Whitby jet is now sold at a miserably low price, about one fifth of its value a few years ago. This, it is said, is because it is not now fashionable. Now, ye who talk loudly about encouraging our native productions, again affect jet jewellery, and so raise the price of this peculiar form of coal. By so doing you will indirectly lighten the lives, brighten the homes, and feed the starving families of many honest toiling Cleveland miners who, in these direful days of trade depression strive to dig an existence from the hard and rugged cliffs of the Yorkshire coast.


Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st July 1890

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40650
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Jet Industry

Postby dognose » Fri Jan 09, 2015 8:59 am

Formation of a Whitby Jet Syndicate

On Tuesday evening, the 24th ult., a meeting of the employers and workmen of the Whitby jet trade was held in the Assembly Rooms, Whitby, for the purpose of discussing, and, if possible, devising some scheme for improving the present state of the trade. The large room was crowded to excess. Mr. E. W. Beckett, M.P., who presided, in the course of his remarks referred to the depressed condition of the trade, and said he feared it was now worse off than ever. In some quarters such a serious view of it was taken that it was apprehended that the jet trade of Whitby was threatened with extinction. They were met that evening to consider what should be done to rescue the jet trade from its present unsatisfactory position, to set it upon its legs again, and if possible to restore its former prosperity. Unquestionably, if the jet trade were to perish it would be a great misfortune and loss to Whitby, as it was one of the oldest trades in the town, and had made Whitby famous and prosperous in days gone by. Coming to the practical point, he asked what was the cause of the decay in their jet trade. Some might blame that craze for cheapness that had taken possession of the public in these latter days. In their rage for cheapness the public, rather than go without jet ornaments at all, would buy those of an inferior description, and this tendency had either driven the good jet out of the market or made the working of it unprofitable. It must be confessed that the fashion for wearing jewellery had rather gone out of late. The fashion was changeable and its caprices were innumerable, so that what had gone out to-day might come in again to-morrow, and he hoped that it would. They should try to attract the public by putting a really good article before them. They were met to discuss the present state of things, which they all deplored, and how that remedy was to be applied. They wanted a practical outcome from that meeting, and on the formation of a jet syndicate the first thing was that they should work unanimously together towards one particular end–the revival of the jet trade. Then they must all combine together in order to bring this movement to a successful termination. As an encouragement to them he would point out that Whitby held a very advantageous position in reference to the jet trade. Whitby jet was celebrated all over the world, and a movement of this description starting from Whitby must have an enormous influence. Occupying that position they had not so much to fear from competition. On the formation of their syndicate it was obvious that some system of trades marks must be adopted. Was it not possible to hall-mark jet in the same way as they hall-marked silver, which would protect the public against fraud and misrepresentation. They must find some solution of the problem how to supply the public with jet which was what it professed to be. Another great point to be insisted upon was that the workmen should combine together to protect themselves. They lived in days of combination, and it was hardly possible for a movement to succeed without it. This syndicate might assist its members in times of distress, and so prevent prices being driven down below a certain point. They wanted to save the workmen from being defrauded out of the just reward of their artistic skill and merit. Lastly, in these days they could not succeed without efficient advertising. He could assure them that he wished in every possible way to associate himself with their welfare and material interests, and nothing could give him greater pleasure than to be of some assistance to bring back the trade of former days, which was a source of much prosperity to the town.

Mr. Charles Bryan moved " That an association, to be called the Whitby Jet Jewellers' Association, be now formed for safeguarding and improving the trade." Mr. Isaac Langdale seconded the motion, which was supported by Mr. R. E. Pannett (who said what they needed was proper classification), Mr. J. Stevenson and Mr. Robert Harrowing. The last-named speaker said Whitby had a monopoly of this trade, and the men had it in their power to better their condition if the men were only true to themselves. The resolution was put to the meeting and carried unanimously.

Mr. W. Stonehouse also addressed the meeting.

On the motion of Mr. Peguero, seconded by Mr. T. Tose, Mr. Beckett was unanimously appointed president of the association.

Mr. T. Preston moved the appointment of a committee to make the necessary arrangements and to have the association duly registered, which was seconded by Mr. W. B. Pearson, and carried unanimously.

A vote of thanks to the chairman terminated the proceedings.


Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st July 1890

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40650
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Jet Industry

Postby dognose » Fri Jan 16, 2015 7:57 am

WHITBY JET

It would not be the easiest matter in the world to account for the fact that very many houses of really good standing that used to keep jet, have from some cause or other abandoned it. Whether with the increase of their business they have felt above it, or whether the Anti-Mourning Society have influenced the public to pay less attention to this expression of sympathy with those who have gone before, we cannot say. But we think there is another evil to blame for this, and that was the introduction of divers sorts of materials under the name of jet, which no more possessed the characteristics of our fine Whitby jet, than they did of their still more distant relative, the diamond. Not only have we seen, and have, in fact, still before us, articles made of very inferior foreign jet and lignite, but of anthracite canal and other coals, and even carbonaceous shale. There are few gems to which our island can lay claim ; but taking a gem to be a thing of beauty, comparative rarity and durability, we can boast of a true gem in the finest variety of Whitby jet. It has a perfection of blackness, coupled with the greatest amount of surface lustre and homogeneity of structure of any substance with which we are brought into contact; and when once the finest- varieties are seen these facts become apparent. We have before us now several hundred specimens from all parts of the world of jets and its allies, and although we have long cherished some fine American specimens collected by our own expert friends, when we compare them with a specimen that we have lately received from Whitby, they must for ever take a back seat. In testing the qualities of these jets, too, one is more than ever impressed with the advantages that must be claimed for the Whitby specimens over those from any other part. In the majority of polished specimens of foreign jet that we have the face is more or less full of cracks, and often if one is polished out a half-a-dozen come to its funeral ; not only parallel to the line of bedding, which, if the specimen is not lignitic, is always so pronounced, but in every direction at right angles to it, so that it is impossible to make articles of this material hold together for any length of time. This, no doubt, is the great evil which lies at the root of the whole question. Jewellers had this abominable rubbish palmed upon them as jet, which, no matter how quick a sale it appeared to possess, was soon represented by a draw full of breakages. And–tell it not in Gath –it was reported that this very stuff in many instances came from Whitby ! Obviously, then, it was not either Whitby jet, nor had it any claim to be sold as such. However, jewellers ultimately got tired of the nuisance occasioned by it, and although the profits it bore were very large upon what was sold, somehow or other the loss upon the broken and damaged did not compensate it ; and so one by one they dropped it, and the industry began to flag. It had lost the public esteem and confidence, and there seemed no hope of recovery ; until, at last, it was suggested that as there was an ideal standard, and there were a number of qualities of jet ranging down to the worthless, there should be some means of guaranteeing the standard of quality in a similar manner to that employed with the noble metals. Accordingly, a meeting was called under the presidency of Mr. E. W. Beckett, M.P. for Whitby, and the principal and leading firms of the jet trade decided to adopt a system of classification of the different qualities of jet, and give a guarantee, either by a trade-mark or in some other significant and comprehensible manner, so that the public might know what they really were buying. The classifications decided upon were:

No. A1, Genuine Whitby Hard Jet
No. 1, Foreign Hard Jet.
No. 2, Soft Jet.

Only the A1 and No. 1 qualities will show the trade-mark. One of the chief agitators' for this reform was Mr. J. Langdale, of the Standard Jet Works. His trade-mark is a double triangle enclosing the spiral shell of an ammonite, a creature allied to the nautilus of the present day, now extinct, but which, in the geological period in which these Whitby beds were deposited, were amongst the most numerous denizens of the ocean.

No. 2 Quality.–This is the common soft foreign jet usually called, " French jet." The raw material is very cheap, and being much softer the expense of working it is considerably less than that of any other jet. The colour and polish is fairly good when new, but both are soon affected by the atmosphere, and, worse still, will soon crack either by frost or heat ; it is a common thing to find hundreds of cracks on one single brooch. It should only be used for small earrings and common brooches for cheap markets where price is the main object, but should never be used for bracelets, etc.

No. 1 Quality.–The No. 1 quality, or foreign hard jet, is much stronger than the No. 2 quality. The rough material is more costly, and the expense of working it is more, being much tougher than the No. 2 quality. It is not affected by the atmosphere, and as it will not crack it is very suitable for the medium-class goods, but does not possess the advantages of the No. A1 quality English, and is not suitable for most kinds of finest goods.

No. A1 Quality.–This is the finest English hard jet, or genuine Whitby jet. The raw material is very expensive. The advantages it possesses over all other kinds of jet are its great durability and strength. It takes a superior polish to any other kind of jet, being of a finer grain and bearing the same relation that ivory does to bone. It is much lighter in weight, and not so liable to snip. On account of its fine texture it is much more suitable for Fine Art carving, as the best of foreign jet is much coarser in the grain. It is not affected in the slightest degree by : the atmosphere. It is also very superior for link and chain work, being more of the nature of whalebone. The best of foreign jet is much too brittle for this purpose. The best of foreign is also unsuitable for covering lockets on account of its being too brittle and too coarsely grained. The superiority of the finest English jet over the best of foreign jet is more clearly discerned on a polished flat surface. The English is as clear as a piece of plate-glass, but the best of foreign is full of waves and marks.

With so intelligible and sound basis to work upon no one need be ashamed or afraid to sell A1 Whitby Jet.


Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 2nd February 1891

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40650
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Jet Industry

Postby dognose » Sat Jan 17, 2015 8:29 am

We hear from Whitby the new system of stamping and guaranteeing the quality of jet is received most favourably by the trade, and is certain to be even more so by the public. The pioneers of this reform, however, do not expect it will be supported by those firms in the trade who are solely or principally interested in foreign jet, neither by several of the London wholesale firms, as the latter purchase principally from small makers, who in most cases are not yet in a position to give the necessary guarantee, by each article bearing maker's trade mark ; and as the penalties are so heavy (under the Merchandise Marks Act) it is probable the London wholesale merchants will hesitate before giving such a valuable guarantee on their own responsibility. This makes it all the more important that buyers who require the genuine article should purchase only those goods that bear the manufacturers' trade mark, as verbal guarantees have in most cases proved to be worthless. All buyers, both wholesale and retail, should be careful to note this fact.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st May 1891

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40650
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Jet Industry

Postby dognose » Mon Feb 02, 2015 3:10 pm

THE JET TRADE MARK

Image
1891

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40650
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Jet Industry

Postby dognose » Wed Feb 04, 2015 3:27 pm

CRADDOCK

21, Argyle Arcade, 489, Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow


Image
Craddock - Glasgow - 1884

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40650
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Jet Industry

Postby dognose » Mon Mar 09, 2015 12:48 pm

JAMES AINSLEY

5, Tait's Yard, and Capella House, Ainsley's Court, Church Street, Whitby


Image
James Ainsley - Whitby - 1880

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40650
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Jet Industry

Postby dognose » Mon Mar 23, 2015 11:04 am

A most perfect petrifaction of a human leg has just been found by two men, whilst digging for jet, in the rock near Whitby; its size is about that of the leg of a man of middle stature, and its shape is very perfect and good, with the exception of being a little swollen in the ancle and heel, but on the whole it is a good specimen, and leaves no doubt on the minds of those who have examined it of its having been at some time the leg of a human being.

Source: The Stuttgart Evening Post - 17th January 1835

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40650
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Jet Industry

Postby dognose » Fri Jun 05, 2015 5:25 pm

Growing Popularity of Jet Jewelry

As noticed recently in previous issues of this journal, jet jewelry is assuming more prominence each succeeding season, and to-day is popular to a marked degree. The idea which so long prevailed that jet was fit only for the mature woman or for mourning purposes has been entirely routed from the mind of the well-informed.

Jet is prominent in every form of jewelry, combs, brooches, hat pins, hair pins, chains, earrings, bracelets and other ornaments of countless descriptions. Dog collar necklaces of jet, with bars and fastenings of diamonds or rhinestones, are especially in evidence.

There are all kinds of brooches, small and large; those made to represent lions, dogs, birds and reptiles are exceedingly attractive. Then there are bangles, pendants and a revival of the old-fashioned link bracelet, fastened with a double row of elastic cord, which was so popular many, many years ago.

Strings of jet beads, cut in various shapes and sizes, will be considerably worn. Purse and fan chains, and those chains which are particularly long and finished with tassclled cut bead ends, seem to be strongly favored.


Source: Notions and Fancy Goods - January 1909


Continued Popularity of Jet

Jet continues to be the predominant note of the season. Not only in jewelry does it lead, but for trimmings on gowns, jet buttons on coats and jet ornaments on hats are only a few uses to which it will be put. Jet ornaments are even now extremely scarce. Some new imported long chains of beautifully cut beads are made in graduated sizes, long enough to extend below the waist line and worn with a pendant in carved jet over street and evening costumes. These pendants are sometimes in the shape of crosses, heart-shaped or round lockets, and often a festoon of tassels formed of many minute beads. The dog collars of jet are more popular than ever, with the low Dutch neck gowns, and look equally well worn over lingerie waists to keep the tall collars close to the neck. La Vallieres of jet are shown in profusion, and combinations of cut and dull jet are among the pleasing novelties.

For hair ornamentation, nothing prettier can be found than the combs and barrettes and fancy pins of jet. One of the oddities of the season is a long chain finished at either end with a tassel of small beads. It is worn over the long-waisted "Moyen Age" gowns as a girdle, and is simply knotted loosely and hangs long at the front of the waist.

Jet butterflies do duty for lace pins, and bars fasten the Irish lace collars, while old-fashioned cameo designs are being reproduced in this fascinating stone. Even jet shirtwaist rings are being sold, and from all indications, unless a woman is liberally provided with jet ornaments galore, she will be hopelessly out of fashion.


Source: Notions and Fancy Goods - December 1909


Long Jet Chains Will Be Popular

There is a craze for long chains in jet, not only those used for the watch, but as lorgnette and muff chains.

The newest of these is a string of round cut beads, divided into groups with a long old-fashioned cut bugle. There are others more slender and, incidentally, less expensive. Beads in groups, connected by short lengths of gun-metal links, are popular and not at all expensive.

Blouse sets in jet are pretty and serviceable, for there it no metal to become discolored. They are inexpensive, as a set, consisting of three buttons, can be retailed nt a good profit for fifty cents. There are others, of course, higher priced, but for practical wear a fairly good set can be sold at retail for fifty and seventy-five cents, either plain or cut, as preferred.

Brooches are in ring, horseshoe and butterfly effects.

This insect only is represented in the newest designs, the fad for bugs being over.

The ring brooch of cut jet in an even size will be worn, with Dutch collars, while the horseshoe, which comes in a number of different sizes, is preferred as a finish to the equally popular jabot.

Jet hatpins will have a monopoly of the sale, judging from the number and variety of them shown in the shops. The latest is the umbrella, which, as its name implies, is shaped like a miniature umbrella and is of cut jet in filigree.

There is no lack of the long pear-shaped head among the collections of these pins, and there is no other kind so convenient for pinning on a large hat
.

Source: Notions and Fancy Goods - December 1909

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40650
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Jet Industry

Postby dognose » Mon Jul 20, 2015 6:34 am

The Whitby Jet Ornaments are known and esteemed all the world over ; that famous town of sea-cliffs and sea-bathers has had a monopoly of the trade ever since it was “ invented,” and it has this rare advantage—that the imitation, while always inferior to, cannot be produced so cheaply as, the original. For a very long period, however, the manufacturers of Whitby trusted solely to the inherent beauty of the natural material, and did not seek to give to it the value it was capable of deriving from Art. Their works were, to say the least, rude and uninviting ; yet there is no production of Nature so tempting to the artist; none so easily cut and carved, with results at once certain and charming. So far back as 1856, Mr. Robert Hunt, in the Art-Journal, drew attention to the capabilities then undeveloped, and probably did much to stimulate that advance which is now assured. The commerce in Jet has largely prospered, and the Art-influence to which it has been subjected has mainly contributed to such prosperity ; of that there can be no doubt. The manufacturers of that attractive town are now fully alive to the fact that, to keep and extend a trade is not so easy as to make it, and they are very wisely exerting them— selves to render their art-manufacture as perfect as other branches of art-manufacture have become; the leading vendors are indeed resorting for help to skilful artists, and hesitating at no expense that may secure progressive excellence. During last month, “a Jet Exhibition” was held at Whitby, when prizes to the value of £120 were presented to successful competitors ; the awards having been made by Professor Tennant, specially “retained” for that duty. The amount was derived from a subscription, headed by Sir George Elliott, Bart., M.P. The general result was highly satisfactory, and will, no doubt materially influence the future of the town ; for, although much has been done, there is yet much to do. We are assured that all its manufacturers will combine: in efforts to do it, while they are greatly aided by the neighbouring gentry, and no doubt by the “patronage” of the visitors ; for Whitby now holds high rank among the most agreeable, healthful, and attractive of the sea-bathing places of England.

Source: The Art Journal - 1874

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40650
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Jet Industry

Postby dognose » Wed Sep 02, 2015 5:37 am

Apropos of the vogue of black once more the little Yorkshire towns here are reviving an ancient industry—jet ornament making. The demands of the retail jewelers handling the jet lines are such that the workshops of the Yorkshire towns are working overtime. Since Paris has set the seal of approval on jet jewelry and the smartest people there wear jet set with diamonds just now the vogue promises to have a good run. Black lingerie, black shoes and black jewelry make a rather novel combination. Diamonds are now being set in black enamel and jet in rings and bracelets Some necklaces are entirely of jet. Jet ear-rings are composed of three slender concentric rings, the middle ring being of diamonds. They swing from a single diamond in the ear lobe. Since jet "came back" this side vermilion red, flame-color, custard-yellow, cobalt blue and other bright hues in jewel ornamentation have taken a back seat. But it may be only temporarily.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 30th November 1921

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40650
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Jet Industry

Postby dognose » Mon Nov 16, 2015 1:55 pm

YOUNG & KNIGHT

188, Warstone Lane, Birmingham


DISSOLUTIONS OF PARTNERSHIP

Young and Knight —188 Warston-lane, jet ornament manufacturers. William Knight, Frederick Mark Young, William Barrett . As regards Frederick Mark Young. 5th January 1872.


Source: The Birmingham Commercial List - Estell & Co. - 1874

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40650
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Jet Industry

Postby dognose » Wed Dec 09, 2015 2:17 pm

JONES & HOLLAND

9, Mott Street, Birmingham


DISSOLUTIONS OF PARTNERSHIP

Jones and Holland.—9 Mott-street, jet ornament manufacturers. John Holland, George Jones jun. 15th May 1868.


Source: The Birmingham Commercial List - Estell & Co. - 1874

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40650
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Jet Industry

Postby dognose » Wed Jan 06, 2016 6:36 am

The mourning needs of the war has called jet jewelry into vogue once more. O. C. Farrington says: Jet is a variety of coal, which takes a good polish, and hence can be used in jewelry. Its hardness is between 3 and 4, and specific gravity 1.35. It is a kind of brown coal or lignite, and retaining as it does some of the original structure of the wood, is not brittle and smutty as is most coal. To be of the quality desirable for cutting it must be black, of a uniform color. and have a somewhat fatty lustre. The jet of commerce has for a long time come chiefly from Whitby, Yorkshire, England.

Source: The Brass World and Platers Guide - April 1920

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40650
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Jet Industry

Postby dognose » Fri Feb 05, 2016 2:41 pm

J.A. DEKNATEL & SON, Inc.

Wythe Avenue, Brooklyn and 303, Fifth Avenue, New York


Image
J.A. Deknatel & Son, Inc. - Brookyn - 1915


Forty-Seven Years of Progress - A Mercantile History That Reads Like a Fairy Tale

By Frederick J. Pope


That "Great Oaks from Little Acorns Grow" was never better illustrated than in the following brief history of a house, the foundation of which was laid in a most modest way and which is now known the world over.

In May, 1868, John A. Deknatel, or De Knatel, which is the original spelling, began the manufacture of imitation precious stones in a small loft on Walker Street, this city. Mr. Deknatel was born in Amsterdam, Holland, in 1840, and the jewelry business seemed a natural one for him to adopt.

His business prospered from the beginning, so much so that he soon was obliged to seek much larger quarters. In the early 80's when buttons were so largely worn he turned his attention to the manufacture of jet buttons, producing an article finished to the point of perfection. In 1892 he brought out the now famous "Deknatel" Pearl which so closely resembles the real gem that only an expert can distinguish between them.

In January, 1899, a son, Henry C., was admitted to partnership and in 1903 the firm incorporated as J. A. Deknatel & Son.

Mr. J. A. Deknatel died on April 4th, 1906, and the care of the business was shifted to the shoulders of his son, Henry C.

Image

In the meantime the business had grown to such proportions that much larger quarters were leased at 214 East 23d Street, and factory and salesrooms were removed to that address. The business has continued to grow and now to meet its requirements the company has acquired a four-story building extending from Hayward Street to Wallabout Street on Wythe Avenue, Brooklyn, where they will be located after January 1st.

A Few Words as to the Personnel of the Co.

Upon the death of Mr. Deknatel, Sr., his son. Harry C, took over the entire management of the business and as a result of his energy and close
application the business grew tremendously, but unfortunately a little over three years ago his health failed and he was obliged to go out to the coast, where he will undoubtedly remain permanently. At the annual meeting of the corporation just held, officers were elected as follows: Alexander Choffel, President; R. C. Hynds, Vice-President and Treasurer; Millard Pretzfelder, Secretary, with Henry C. Deknatel, Honorary President.

From Package Boy to President

Mr. Choffel entered the employ of the firm twenty-six years ago as package boy, and by strict attention and unceasing energy is now president of the company. Mr. Hynds has served seventeen years as salesman and personal adviser to Mr. Deknatel. He is now vicepresident and treasurer, and will continue as heretofore to visit the trade in Chicago and Cleveland four times each year.

Mr. Pretzfelder, secretary, is a man of wide experience, whose entry into the company resulted in largely increasing its scope. He has added several new lines, which made larger manufacturing facilities imperative. He will look after the needs of the jobbing trade.

At the time Mr. Choffel entered the employ of the firm seven others entered. Of the eight, four still remain, and one of them, Otto Meyer, has just been appointed superintendent of the factory and has been presented with a stock interest. Miss Florence A. Kurtz entered the employ of the company as an assistant bookkeeper in 1906 and as a reward for faithful service has been appointed assistant treasurer and presented with a stock interest.

The Present Selling Force

E. F. Lozier is the dean of the selling force, having been in the service continuously for over twenty years. He will continue to visit the trade in Greater New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington.

E. H. Babcock cannot boast of twenty years' service, but it isn't his fault that he is so young, and time will alter that anyway, lie will continue to cover his regular territory from Pittsburgh to Omaha as usual.

R. C. Wasson looks after the wants of the manufacturing trade and is a "Deknatel" man in the sense that the foregoing story implies. Mr. Choffel, Mr. Hynds and Mr. Pretzfelder constitute the Board of Directors of the corporation.

The writer has been in close touch with this concern for nearly ten years and is well acquainted with their ideals and aspirations. His only regret is that this brief history, covering a period of nearly forty-eight years, does not do justice to the fine fellows who are responsible for it.


Source: Notions and Fancy Goods - December 1915

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40650
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Jet Industry

Postby dognose » Sat Feb 06, 2016 1:16 pm

W.J. KITTEL

95, Zabriskie Street, Jersey City


Image
W.J. Kittel - Jersey City - 1915

The business of William J. Kittel.


Providence

Joseph M. Metcalf, formerly of the Campbell-Metcalf Silver Co.. is now representing W. J. Kittel Co., Jersey City.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 15th March 1899

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40650
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Jet Industry

Postby dognose » Wed Mar 30, 2016 5:44 am

J.J. COHN

12, Maiden Lane, New York


Image
J.J. Cohn - New York - 1884

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40650
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Jet Industry

Postby dognose » Sun Apr 24, 2016 6:01 am

STACY & Co.

738, Broadway, New York


Image
Stacy & Co. - New York - 1909

Trev.


Return to “Contributors' Notes”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests