Walker & Hall - Information and Advertisements

For information you'd like to share - Post it here - not for questions
dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42864
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Walker & Hall - Information and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Sun Nov 02, 2014 11:39 am

Two pieces of art workmanship, both of them football challenge shields, and each from the works of Messrs Walker and Hall, are being publicly shown in
different parts of the town. One is for competition among the clubs of Sheffield and the other among the school clubs of the neighbouring borough of Rotherham. Broadly speaking, they are creditable specimens of works of their kind, although that part of each of them which gives them their distinctive character might be improved with advantage. There are plenty of art workmen in Sheffield capable of executing work of this kind, but, like Benvenuto Cellini of old, they estimate the value of their services at a tolerably high figure. This may be prohibitive in the case of the ordinary run of tea services, but it would pay in the end to spend a little more money on work of the nature of these two shields.


Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 2nd February 1891

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42864
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Walker & Hall - Information and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Tue Nov 04, 2014 11:27 am

THE MUIR WILSON SHIELD

Image

In these days of extensive cycling it is only reasonable to suppose that some very valuable prize should be offered to tempt these wonders of the wheel, but the most elaborate thing that has been produced for cycling competition is doubtless the Muir Wilson Shield, in connection with the Sheffield Cycling Tournament, of which the above is an illustration. The shield is of heraldic form and measures fully two and a-half feet. It is of sterling silver throughout. The ornamentation consists of richly-chased scroll and floral work, a number of suitable spaces for the names of winners being gracefully interwoven in the border of the design. In a large centre space is shown a cycling scene on the Bramall Lane track, the whole of the surroundings of which are perfect. The view has been engraved from specially-prepared photographs. The shield is enriched by representations of the Sheffield coat of arms, the crest and motto of the donor, and the white rose of York, all of which are enamelled in appropriate colors, and suitably relieved by being displayed on a gold background. The shield is shown on a groundwork of blue plush. The trophy, which is said to be the finest of its kind yet manufactured, weighs 150 ounces, and was made by Messrs. Walker and Hall, of Sheffield and London.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st July 1892

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42864
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Walker & Hall - Information and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Wed Nov 05, 2014 9:26 am

WALKER & HALL

Flag Building, Grenfell Street, Adelaide


Details of Walker & Hall's Adelaide Branch:

E. W. LANGDON, manager in South Australia and Western Australia for Walker & Hall, manufacturers of gold and sterling silver goods, cutlery, electroplate, etc., Sheffield,. England, arrived in Adelaide from England in 1878, under an engagement to Messrs. George P. Harris, Scarfe, & Co., with whom he remained for twenty-five and a half years.

Image

Early in 1904 Mr. Langdon severed his connection with the above-mentioned firm, and assumed the management of Messrs. Walker and Hall's branch wholesale stock and show-rooms in South Australia, situated in Flag Building, Grenfell Street, Adelaide, the head office in Australia being at George Street, Sydney. It is principally through his wide experience in the electroplate trade, his large circle of friends, his personality, and his straightforward dealings that Mr. Langdon has made the branch establishment of Messrs. Walker & Hall in the western States of the Commonwealth so successful.

The distinctive industries of Sheffield–the industries which instantly occur to one whenever the city is mentioned–are silver and electro-plate and cutlery. Not only do these branches of manufacture demand the services of many thousands of highly-skilled artisans, but the finished productions, in quantity, in variety, and in quality, excel those of any like district in the world. It was in 1742 that the idea was at first conceived of welding silver on a copper basis, by means of rolling, transforming the metal into sheet form. The articles produced from this combination of useful and precious metals were known as Sheffield plate–now the most prized "Old" Sheffield plate– and their manufacture gave a wonderful stimulus to the city's industry. But even more important was the discovery of the electro-deposition of the gold and silver, for one has only to reflect for a moment on the universal use of electro-plate at the present day to realize what a mighty trade was thus originated.

The most striking illustration of the expansion of this branch of Sheffield's trade is afforded by the history of Walker & Hall's sterling silver cutlery and electro-plate works. Over fifty years ago, only nineteen hands were employed in the industry, their operations being carried on in a building which would be lost in a single department of the present works; today over 2,000 employees with a productive capacity enormously increased by the use of the most improved methods and machinery, are required. In 1903 the certified length of work-benches and plating-vats was 2 miles 128 1/2 yards. But, apart from mere size, the firm of Walker & Hall has several claims to distinction. It was the founder, Mr. George Walker, who plated the first useful article ever electro-silvered in the world, and assisted Dr. Wright, of Attercliffe, a suburb of Sheffield, in the discovery of the invention. In the face of obstacles which must have many times tempted Walker & Hall to consign the new process to oblivion, the firm created so great a demand for electro-plated goods that scores of firms and millions of capital are now engaged in the industry the world over. With a single exception, they have gained the highest possible award at every exhibition at which the goods have been placed in competition, while, wherever honest material and beauty of design and finish are appreciated their workmanship is highly prized by all those who possess life's greatest treasure, a love of the beautiful. In entering the showroom of the Adelaide branch establishment, the visitor's attention is arrested by a large photograph of the Sheffield works, which is the firm's headquarters, from whence gold goods, sterling silver and electro-plated ware are distributed to their sixteen branches over England, Scotland. Ireland, Africa, Australia, and New Zealand.

Walker & Hall have a distinct advantage over other similar firms. They manufacture their goods in such enormous quantities that the cost is thereby reduced to a minimum. In the showroom there are numerous cases containing a diversity of electro-plate, silver, and sterling silver and solid gold goods. Stretching the whole length of the showroom are two long tables, with beautiful plush coverings, with lace edging. These tables are laden with most exquisite pieces of plate and cases of goods, which, when the electric light is turned on, dazzles one's eyes. At the end of the showroom is a beautiful mirror which stands nine feet high and six feet wide, in front of which swings an elegant pair of electro-gilt and silver altar gates. At the other end of the showroom is the finest cabinet of goods ever seen in Australia. It stands six feet high and five and a half feet wide, and contains a full suite of Old English spoons and forks, table cutlery, fruit and fish knives and forks, tea and coffee service, entree dishes, etc., etc. This cabinet alone is worth going to see, and Mr. Langdon and his obliging staff are only too pleased to show visitors through the well arranged and up-to-date showroom.


Source: The Cyclopedia of South Australia ...: An Historical and Commercial Review. Descriptive and Biographical, Facts, Figures, and Illustrations. An Epitome of Progress. - Volume 1 - Henry Thomas Burgess - 1907.

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42864
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Walker & Hall - Information and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Tue Nov 11, 2014 6:35 am

Image
Walker & Hall - Sheffield - 1882

Representatives: London - H.D. Walker, Heber Ward; England - C.D. Needham, W.E. Darwin, W.J. Hookway; Scotland and Ireland - R. James.

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42864
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Walker & Hall - Information and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Wed Nov 12, 2014 12:32 pm

A sure sign that the year is on the wane is the holding of the meeting to elect the Master Cutler and to re-constitute the Cutlers' Company for the ensuing year. The Master Cutler (Mr. J. F. Atkinson) being absent, at Chicago, the chair was taken by the ex-Master Cutler (Mr. Robt. Belfitt). Mr. George Howsen, of the firm of Harrison Bros, and Howsen, Norfolk-street, was elected Master Cutler, and Mr. Chas. Henry Bingham advanced from the junior to the senior wardenship ; Mr. Henry Herbert Andrew was elected junior warden. The searchers and assistant searchers were then appointed. The only new member of the company is Mr. William Jessop who takes the place of Mr. John Marshall, resigned. The installation of Mr. Geo. Howsen as Master Cutler will take place on the first Thursday in September. This year the Cutlers' Feast will not be held on the same day, but will come off later on, probably on October 26th, or November 2nd.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st September 1893

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42864
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Walker & Hall - Information and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Wed Nov 12, 2014 3:57 pm

Obituary

Charles Henry Bingham was born in Sheffield on 28th May 1848. He was educated at Tinsley Vicarage, afterwards at Storthes Hall, near Huddersfield, and subsequently at Neuwied on the Rhine. After serving a short time at the locomotive works of the Great Northern Railway at Doncaster, he entered the electroplate and cutlery works of Messrs. Walker and Hall, at Sheffield, when the business was being carried on by his elder brother, Colonel J. E. Bingham, and his uncle, the late Mr. H. Hall. On the retirement of the latter he became a partner, devoting himself more particularly to the manufacturing part of the business, to the extension of the premises, and to the inventing and perfecting of the machinery. In 1882 he joined the Cutler's Company, and was Master Cutler in 1894-1895. Having been in indifferent health for some months, his death occurred rather suddenly at his residence in Sheffield on 2nd October 1900, at the age of fifty-two. He became a Member of this Institution in 1890.


Source: Institution of Mechanical Engineers - 1900

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42864
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Walker & Hall - Information and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Fri Nov 14, 2014 3:53 pm

WALKER & HALL

Electro Plating Works, Sydney

This house has been in existence for over three-quarters of a century, and it holds the honoured position of being the pioneer in the great art industry with which its name is associated, the electro deposition of gold and silver. One has only to reflect for a moment upon the universal use of electro plate at the present day to understand what a mighty trade was originated at Sheffield some seventy-five years ago. The present senior partner, Colonel Sir John E. Bingham, J.P., entered the business at sixteen, and has advanced step by step through all its grades to his present position, and is now the oldest master electro plater living. When Sir John E. Bingham joined the firm it mustered twenty hands; now it employs over two thousand work people. Messrs. Walker and Hall manufacture every class, not only of electro plate, but also of solid silver ware and the best table cutlery. In all their goods the firm maintains a high standard of merit, which is quite unsurpassed, and they hold very large stocks of the various goods, the exquisite design and finish of which may be seen to advantage in the warehouses and showrooms in the various States. The general quality of each article is attested by the presence of the trade mark of the house, a flag bearing the letters W. and H. Messrs. Walker and Hall hold the highest awards it has been possible to gain at every exhibition at which their goods have been placed in competition. Branch business establishments of a thoroughly up-to-date character have been opened up in the various States of the Commonwealth, and the firm is ever to the front in utilising Australian labour wherever practicable.

Image

The New South Wales general manager is Mr. Albert E. Nash, one of Sydney's most popular citizens, who is ever to the front in furthering the best interests of everything Australian.

Image

Source: Australian Industry ... By Federal Council of the Chambers of Manufactures of Australia - 1906

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42864
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Walker & Hall - Information and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Sat Nov 15, 2014 9:59 am

International Exhibition, Glasgow - 1888

Sheffield is represented by Messrs. Walker & Hall, who also showed at Manchester, with a large and imposing display of silver and electro-plate goods which at once attracts the eye as the visitor goes in at the main entrance of the exhibition.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st October 1888

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42864
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Walker & Hall - Information and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Sun Nov 16, 2014 1:46 pm

WALKER & HALL

Gallery Level, Mid City Arcade, Sydney


Image
Walker & Hall - Sydney - 1982

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42864
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Walker & Hall - Information and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Sat Nov 22, 2014 12:01 pm

At the Cutlers‘ Feast, which is fixed for September 1, there will be a very fine display of plate from the works of Mr. J. E. Bingham (head of the firm of Messrs. Walker & Hall, Howard Street), who is Master Cutler Elect. Mr. Bingham, who intends to have every article of plate on the tables from his own works, with the addition of a few epergnes, will be able to carry out his proposal by simply drawing upon the resources of his own firm. On former occasions the leading silversmiths of Sheffield were called upon to contribute articles for the banquet-tables, but the Master Cutler this year intends to supply plate himself for a company that will number about 400.

Source: The British Trade Journal and Export World - 1st September 1881

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42864
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Walker & Hall - Information and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Mon Dec 01, 2014 6:05 am

The phenomenal growth of many of the silver and electro-plate firms of the town has been more than once alluded to in these notes. The extension of Walker and Hall's premises in the direction of Cadman lane is rapidly approaching completion. Five years ago had any new factory been built with the working capacity of this extension it would have taken its place at once in the first class. Now, however, this addition excites very little remark. In connection with these continual extensions, the company deem it necessary to have an elaborate system of wires running through the whole factory, and connected with a sort of tell-tale clock, which, by an ingenious contrivance, registers any dereliction of duty on the part of the night watchman in making his rounds.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st August 1891

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42864
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Walker & Hall - Information and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Tue Dec 02, 2014 9:09 am

The feeling evoked by the death of the late Lieutenant West is characteristic of Sheffield. Although occupying a position of great responsibility in one of the largest electro-plate manufactories of the town, he was in no sense a public man. His relation to the silver trade was not technical, but was brought about by the influence of Col. Bingham, who is at the same time head of the firm of Walker and Hall and chief of the Sheffield Engineers, of which regiment Lieutenant West was originally drill-instructor. The healthy out-door tastes of all classes of Sheffielders renders a man in Lieutenant West's position, who may at the same time possess popular social qualities, what the Americans would call a " prominent citizen." This accounts for the semi-public character of his funeral and the large amount of sympathy evinced at his somewhat sudden and altogether unexpected death.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st October 1891

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42864
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Walker & Hall - Information and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Wed Dec 17, 2014 5:00 am

WALKER & HALL

Cape Town Buildings, St George's Street, Cape Town.


Image
Walker & Hall - Cape Town - 1907

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42864
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Walker & Hall - Information and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Sat Dec 20, 2014 11:30 am

SHEFFIELD AND ELECTROPLATING

High jinks were carried on by the employes and guests of Messrs. Walker and Hall, of the Electro Works, Sheffield, last week, in honour of the coming of age of the eldest son of the senior partner, Lieut.-Colonel J. E. Bingham, J.P., of the firm. The festivities appeal to us inasmuch as Mr. Walker was the first to introduce electroplating as a commercial pursuit into Sheffield.

Mr. Darwin, in proposing continued success to the firm, pointed this out. Among other things, he said, having been connected with Walker and Hall for over 30 years, it had been considered an opportune moment to give a resume of the rise and progress of the firm, who might claim to be almost the originators, and certainly Mr. Walker was the first to introduce practical electroplating as a commercial pursuit in Sheffield. Mr. Walker, the founder of the firm, was engaged to assist the late Mr. Wright, an apprentice of old Dr. Shearman, and who subsequently became the successful inventor of electroplating. Frequently since his retirement from business, Mr. Walker had explained to him the many difficulties he had to encounter during his early business career, for when he began electroplating he had everything to do by himself–all had to be created. Mr. Walker was not only the first successful practical plater, but he was also the actual inventor of that part which had since become perhaps one of the largest branches in the electroplate trade. The process was never patented, it being regarded as so capable of imitation that Mr. Walker was satisfied to keep the thing simply a secret within his own place. The system only leaked out to the world by degrees, and there were still many firms who were obliged to use a coating of copper between the article and the silver. The business was begun in what was known as the "boil shop." Being only a poor man, Mr. Walker felt the necessity of capital and also the lack of commercial knowledge. These were combined in Mr. Hall, the late and most respected uncle of their present proprietors. This excellent gentleman joined Mr. Walker, and the firm had soon to increase their premises by adding those previously occupied by the late Dr. Knight, and it was in this very house that the inventor of electroplating and Mr. Walker first met. There, in addition to plating for all the manufacturers in Sheffield and others, they began to make spoons and forks, and thus they succeeded in establishing a business which was a credit to themselves and an honour to their memory. In 1856 Mr. Hall introduced his nephew, Mr. John E. Bingham, who was then a young man very similar in appearance and manner to his son, whose majority they were that day celebrating. Mr. Bingham promptly gave evidence of energy and foresight, and when he eventually got the reins into his own hands, one of the first things he did was to persuade his then principals to adopt a corporate mark, one that would secure and more firmly establish the good name for sterling quality which was always, and was to-day, their determination to maintain. That mark was the well-known and universally-distributed flag, attached as it was to articles of their manufacture in every part of the known world, and one that was recognised everywhere as denoting a standard of high quality. In the words of a factory wag–

The flag that's braved a thousand storms
The battle and the breeze,
Is very often to be found
On "Coffees " and on "Teas."

The next step was the production of cutlery in steel, electroplate, and silver, followed by the manufacture of hollow-ware, and, subsequently, a department for the production of plated Britannia metal goods. After supplying the merchants of Sheffield for some time, Mr. Bingham decided to get into direct communication with the London merchants for foreign trade, and to reach the country jewellers and cutlers, in order not only to display their designs, but to maintain their workmanship and prove the quality of their wares by being able to impress their trade mark, the flag, upon their goods. Shortly after Mr. Walker retired, followed at a later period by Mr. Hall, both maintaining to the end a kindly feeling to their old workpeople and successors. Mr. J. E. Bingham, who was for some time sole proprietor with the business under his entire charge, was eventually joined by his brother, Mr Charles H. Bingham, who, by his industry and mechanical knowledge, had materially contributed to the general success of the business, which had grown from an affair engaging about 20 hands to a huge establishment constantly employing more than 700 workpeople. He had no doubt Walker and Hall were now the largest manufacturers of electroplated and silver goods in England. During that time the relations between masters and servants had been of the most pleasing and harmonious character, largely owing, no doubt, to the fact that almost every member of the managing staff, and many of the workpeople, had been there the whole of their working lives. The firm had always invited them to join in their festivities, the celebration that evening being the largest yet held–over 850 workpeople and wives being present. The first and smallest was held in a hotel in High-street in 1863, when they met to celebrate the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Bingham. Some years later they assembled at the Cutlers' Hall to celebrate, not only the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Bingham, but also to welcome Mr. Charles as a partner. The senior principal had been elected by the Cutlers' Company as Master Cutler on two separate occasions–an honour for which, he believed, there had been no precedent. Mr. Charles Bingham was rising into position in the company, and before long would no doubt be at its head, when he would no doubt entertain his friends, including, of course, his workpeople in that title. During his second year of office Mr. J. E. Bingham initiated the Sheffield Workmen's Handcrafts Exhibition, which was opened by His Royal Highness Prince Albert Victor, and Mr. Bingham had the honour of introducing the Prince to his workpeople, at the works, and afterwards of entertaining him at a dinner at which several of them were present.

The Chairman (Lieut.-Col. Bingham) in his reply referred to the introduction of this industry, and remarked that he desired there, speaking before that company, to remember those who had borne the burden of the promotion of electroplating in Sheffield–Mr. Walker and Mr. Hall–who after a useful and honoured life had gone to the rest they had so thoroughly earned, and which he hoped they would all, employer and employed alike, succeed in obtaining after the turmoil and trouble of life were past. Their trade mark, as they had been reminded, was the flag, and he trusted they would take firm grip of the staff of that flag, and rear it steadily, and hold it truly, in the cause of Walker and Hall.


Source: The Electrical Engineer - 29th November 1889

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42864
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Walker & Hall - Information and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Sun Dec 21, 2014 12:54 pm

On the night of the 12th December 1940 the south side of the works at Sheffield and the extensive showrooms contained therein were destroyed by enemy action:

Image
Walker & Hall - Sheffield - 1940

The above image was taken on the morning of the 13th December 1940.

This set-back for the company was followed up in January 1941 when the London showrooms at Holborn Viaduct were badly damaged following another air raid. On the 3rd May 1941 the Liverpool showrooms at Paradise Street were burnt to the ground. Just seven days later, on the 10th May, the London showrooms at Holborn Viaduct were totally destroyed following another air raid.

Amazingly no loss of life resulted from these four incidents.

The above image and information was kindly supplied by member paulh

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42864
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Walker & Hall - Information and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Tue Dec 23, 2014 4:59 am

Image
Walker & Hall - Sheffield - 1945

The above image was kindly supplied by member paulh

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42864
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Walker & Hall - Information and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Thu Jan 08, 2015 5:25 am

All this points to a considerable amount of vitality on the part of the manufacturing silversmiths of Sheffield. Some of them have energy enough and to spare. I mentioned last month Mr. Sibray's crusade against overhead telephone wires and the battle royal which he was waging against the National Telephone Company at Dore. The fight still goes merrily on, the advantage so far being on the side of Mr. Sibray. Another silversmith who has a sacred mission outside his own business sphere is Lieut.- Colonel Bingham, of the firm of Walker and Hall. Mr. Bingham's ruling idea is that the whole fiscal policy of the country is out of joint. He accepts the principle of free trade with a difference. The difference comes in when a foreign country unduly taxes English and especially Sheffield manufactures. It is not to be wondered at, therefore, if Mr. Bingham saw a grand opportunity for airing his notions in the projected town's meeting to protest against the M'Kinley Tariff Bill.

The meeting itself was a magnificent success. For once in its history Paradise Square saw men of all shades of political opinion meet upon a common platform. The resolutions condemnatory of the measure were carried unanimously in a meeting which was thoroughly representative of all sections of the community. To begin with, it was a town's meeting presided over by the Mayor. The Master Cutler and the President of the Chamber of Commerce respectively moved and seconded resolutions which were supported by representatives of the Sheffield Trades Council. The Members of Parliament for the borough were expressly asked to stay away, in order to avoid giving an appearance of party politics to the proceedings. The word " retaliation " was certainly spoken by Mr. Bingham, who was however, promptly called to order by the Chairman.

" Pot Square" before now has struck the keynote of Imperial policy. I am much mistaken if it be not found so in this case. As a matter of expediency the word "retaliation" was tabooed at the meeting, but retaliation is meant, for all that. There is even a danger that something more than mere fiscal retaliation may be the ultimate development of the situation. The immense interests involved in the maintenance of trading relations between this country and America have had more to do with keeping the peace than any matter of sentiment. But if this Tariff Bill passes, there will be no trading relations to interfere with. How this will affect the course of events, when such questions as the Behring Sea controversy enters an acute stage, remains to be seen.


Source: Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st August 1890

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42864
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Walker & Hall - Information and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Wed Feb 11, 2015 11:21 am

An example of the work and mark of Walker & Hall with a Birmingham hallmark of 1911:

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image
W & H - Birmingham - 1911

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42864
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Walker & Hall - Information and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Mon Mar 02, 2015 2:24 pm

ORUBA

Oruba was the trade name used by Walker & Hall on their nickel silver unplated wares.

Image

Image

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42864
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Walker & Hall - Information and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Sun Jun 14, 2015 2:07 pm

An example of the work and mark of Walker & Hall with a Sheffield hallmark of 1929:

Image

Image

Image

Trev.


Return to “Contributors' Notes”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests