American Fraternity, College, Military Badge/Pin Makers

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Re: American Fraternity, College, Military Badge/Pin Makers

Postby dognose » Mon Jul 18, 2016 3:43 am

JOHN FRICK & Co.

23, Maiden Lane, New York


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John Frick & Co. - New York - 1884

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Re: American Fraternity, College, Military Badge/Pin Makers

Postby dognose » Wed Aug 10, 2016 2:00 pm

WILLIAMS & PAYTON

176, Broadway, New York and 107, Friendship Street, Providence, R.I.


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Williams & Payton - New York and Providence, R.I. - 1892


WILLIAMS & PAYTON. Makers of Jewelry, Factory, No. 107 Friendship Street, Providence, R. I.; New York Office. No. 176 Broadway.—Continuous success is the real test of the reliability of all business houses; and this being the well-deserved fortune of Messrs. Williams & Payton, manufacturers of jewelry, No. 107 Friendship Street, no other conclusion can be drawn than that they are entitled to the entire confidence of the trade. The business of this now widely known house was founded in 1862 by W. R. Richards, by whom it was conducted up to May, 1891, when he was succeeded by the present owners, Messrs. Wm, H. Williams and Wm. G. Payton. Mr. Williams is a native of Massachusetts, and resides in New York City, where he is in charge of the firm's office at No. 176 Broadway, where a full line of samples is carried. He was for eighteen years travelling salesman for Mr. Richards, and he is therefore personally known to all the patrons of the house. Mr. Payton was born in this city, and is in charge of the factory here. He is a thoroughly experienced manufacturing jeweler, and carefully supervises all the operations of his assistants. The premises occupied cover an area of 25 x 150 feet, and are equipped with first-class machinery driven by steam-power, and employment is found for fifty workmen. Messrs. Williams & Payton are makers of plated and jet jewelry, including plated lace-pins, ear-drops, scarf-pins, scarf-rings, ear-knobs, finger-rings, and baby-pins, and jet lace-pins, ear-knobs, drops, and bracelets. The goods are made in an endless variety of designs, new patterns being constantly added, and the workmanship is of the most finished character. Two traveling salesmen are sent out from New York, and the trade of the house reaches all over the United States. The facilities of Messrs. Williams & Payton for executing the largest orders are unsurpassed, while their methods of dealing are liberal and honorable to all.

Source: Industries and Wealth of the Principal Points in Rhode Island - 1892

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Re: American Fraternity, College, Military Badge/Pin Makers

Postby dognose » Thu Nov 24, 2016 4:54 am

P. CARROLL

1428, West Cumberland Street, later, 1513, Susquehanna Avenue, Philadelphia


P. Carroll, watchmaker, jeweler and manufacturer of society medals and badges, has removed from 1428 W. Cumberland St. to 1513 Susquehanna Ave., where he has one of the handsomest retail stores up town.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 6th March 1901

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Re: American Fraternity, College, Military Badge/Pin Makers

Postby dognose » Sat Jan 21, 2017 8:10 am

EDWARD VANNESS

142, Fulton Street, New York


Edward Vanness’ Sudden Death

Edward Vanness, for many years established as a manufacturer of badges at 142 Fulton street, New York, shortly after three o’clock last Friday died suddenly while seated in the restaurant of “Sandy Spencer,’’ at 212 Broadway. Mr. Vanness had been a sufferer from heart disease, and he was in the habit of taking a mixture of nitro-glycerine, alcohol and water. A daily paper erroneously stated that his death was due from an overdose of the medicine.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 4th March 1891

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Re: American Fraternity, College, Military Badge/Pin Makers

Postby dognose » Thu Jan 26, 2017 12:27 pm

L.G. BALFOUR Co.

Attleboro, Massachusetts


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L.G. Balfour Co. - Attleboro, Mass. - 1914

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L.G. Balfour Co. - Attleboro, Mass. - 1922

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L.G. Balfour Company - Attleboro, Mass. - 1922

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L.G. Balfour Company - Attleboro, Mass. - 1922

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L.G. Balfour Co. - Attleboro, Mass. - 1922

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L.G. Balfour Company - Attleboro, Mass. - 1927

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L.G. Balfour Co. - Attleboro, Mass. - 1927

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L.G. Balfour Company - Attleboro, Mass. - 1927

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L.G. Balfour Company - Attleboro, Mass. - 1930

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L.G. Balfour Company - Attleboro, Mass. - 1933

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L.G. Balfour Co. - Attleboro, Mass. - 1933


The relations between Phi Gamma Delta and the L. G. Balfour Co., the official jeweler, have been very cordial. Mr. Balfour is a member of Sigma Chi and has been building up a reputation that has won for him the title of official jeweler for nearly forty fraternities and sororities. Under the caption, "Where Tri Belt Crescents Grow," the Trident of Delta Delta Delta gives this interesting glimpse of the Balfour workshop:

Did you ever want to know how our stars and crescent badges are made? Our jewelers, the L. G. Balfour Company, have the second floor of a brick building and a huge factory behind it in Attleboro, Massachusetts, a quaint and interesting New England town which is inhabited by continuous rows of manufacturing jewelers and die cutters. Attleboro is said to be the jewelry-making center of the United States and the finest artists in this line of trade are assembled here.

At the front are Balfour's office and a big room and with dozens of typewriters where many girls receive our jewelry orders, check them and handle the routine work. The factory is a long, narrow room, lined with windows on three sides, with plenty of air and sunshine. The middle floor space contains the delicate polishing wheels, the heavy die stampers, metal cutters, and all other machinery necessary to the quick and accurate manipulation of precious metals. A small electric furnace supplies any heat needed without the dust and unpleasantness of an outside fire. The side walls are bordered solidly with desks, tables and work-benches. Two things impressed me at once about the workers. First, their utter absorption in their tasks, and second, that they are a most unusual crowd of educated, well-mannered and good-looking people. The majority of them are girls. Some one has said that Attleboro is a haven for women workers. Gold, silver, and precious stones are so beautiful, the tasks are not heavy, the environment is good, and I understand that the compensation is worth while.

An order for a Delta pin received in the office is checked and passed on to a sort of cage in the factory, where proper material is issued and our badge begins in a small block of gold. This is forced into a hardened steel die to be cut into proper shape. The crescent is trimmed and polished and the safety catch and star sets are welded on it. The star sets are made in sort of a tube, a tool that was invented and made especially for our needs. It is most complicated, but makes our stars with accuracy and celerity — and they tell me they are quite difficult to manufacture. The three Deltas are enamelled, a most interesting process in itself. Do you know that enamel is a mineral formation and comes in lumps that must be pounded into a fine powder and then soaked in distilled water? And when it comes from the baking process it doesn't look right at all. You would believe that the pin had been entirely ruined, but the polishing wheel soon fixed things up in fine shape. The pearls set in the stars are most carefully selected for color, shape, and size. A thousand of our stones don't make a handful, but Oh! they are lovely. These little jewels can hardly be obtained at any price now, and a special messenger was sent to France in order to obtain enough of them to take care of our Deltas this winter.

Tri Delta is fortunate in having the attention of a large manufacturer, for the small dealers have been unable to buy pearls at anything like a reasonable price for some time.

After each process mentioned above our badge goes to the polishing wheel and finally receives a most careful finishing and inspection before its journey to the engraving machine which makes it your own particular property. From the engraver, the pin goes to the shipping department, is once inspected and is sent to you just as soon as the O. K. from the national marshal releases it.

It was astonishing to note the careful attention given each badge through each process and also the number of people who gave it their best services and artistry.

Any Tri Delta will leave Attleboro with a firm conviction that everything possible is being done to make Delta Delta Delta jewelry the finest of its class that can be manufactured.


Source: The Phi Gamma Delta - 1922

See: viewtopic.php?f=38&t=50316&p=162504&hilit=balfour#p162504

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Re: American Fraternity, College, Military Badge/Pin Makers

Postby dognose » Sat Feb 04, 2017 5:13 am

EDWARD WILLIAMS

New York


Obituary

EDWARD WILLIAMS


Edward Williams, familiarly known in the trade as “ Ned” Williams, died on Tuesday morning August 4, at his home in Brooklyn. He was in his seventy-second year. Deceased came from Providence to New York about thirty years ago and opened an office at 12 Maiden Lane, where he manufactured badges and medals. His reputation for fine work was pre-eminent. Some years later he was succeeded by Deacon Bros. He then re-started in business with a Mr. Kingnear as E. Williams & Co., on the site now covered by the Western Union building. The firm was subsequently dissolved, and in 1873 Mr. Williams opened an office at 196 Broadway, doing business under his own name. Here he remained until his death. During his career Mr. Williams executed orders for the finest masonic badges. His work was considered unsurpassable. He was quite prominent in masonic circles, and claimed to be the originator of the Mystic Shrine emblem which has been universally adopted.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - September 1890

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Re: American Fraternity, College, Military Badge/Pin Makers

Postby dognose » Fri Feb 17, 2017 5:50 am

GEORGE B. SOLEY

1305, Arch Street, Philadelphia


George B. Soley, one of the oldest and best-known engravers in the city, who for many years was a badge and medal maker at 1305 Arch St., which business he conducted in his leisure time while continuously employed in the engraving department of the United States Mint, died Thursday of last week at the age of 65 years. The funeral was held Monday from his late residence, 3400 N. 17th St. Mr. Soley had been employed in the Mint since 1868.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular- 1st April 1908

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Re: American Fraternity, College, Military Badge/Pin Makers

Postby dognose » Wed Mar 01, 2017 5:20 am

CHARLES G. WILLSON

Reading, Pennsylvania


Chas. G. Willson, manufacturing jeweler, Reading, Pa., is to exhibit in his window the beautiful gold badges which are to be presented by the Rainbow Fire Company, of that city, to Chief Engineer O’Connor, Assistants Lynch and Donovan, James Dawson, Florence Fisher, Louis Bauer, W. J. Lee and Patrick Burke, of New Orleans ; and Chief Wm. Kelley, of Montgomery, Ala., for courtesies shown the Rainbow members on their recent tour in the south. The badges are of solid gold, with suitable designs and descriptions, and show that excellent workmanship which has given Mr. Willson a reputation for fine work.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 16th August 1893

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Re: American Fraternity, College, Military Badge/Pin Makers

Postby dognose » Tue Mar 07, 2017 4:27 am

J. HALLER - HALLER'S JEWELRY STORE

46, later, 216, South Main Street, Ann ArborDetroit


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J. Haller - Ann Arbor - 1860

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J. Haller - Ann Arbor - 1888

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J. Haller - Ann Arbor - 1888

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Haller's Jewelry Store - Ann Arbor - 1894

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Haller's Jewelry Store - Ann Arbor - 1906

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Haller's Jewelry Store - Ann Arbor - 1908

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Haller's Jewelry Store - Ann Arbor - 1910

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Haller's Jewelry Store - Ann Arbor - 1911



The Death of Jacob Haller

Detroit, Mich., Dec. 7.—Jacob Haller, one of the best known jewelers in the State and who resided in Ann Arbor, died at that place, last week. The cause of death was congestion of the lungs.

Mr. Haller was born in 1822, at Schwenningen Germany, and came to Ann Arbor, in 1854. In 1858 he opened a jewelry store on Huron St., and took his son George into the business with him. He retired a few years ago but continued in the business of making watchmakers' tools. In this industry he was probably the most skilled worker in the State and bad a wide reputation among the trade.

In 1851 Mr. Haller received medals from the World's Exposition at London, for his superior grade of workmanship; also for the invention of certain watchmakers' tools. He also received medals from the Philadelphia Exposition authorities. He leaves four children.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 12th December 1894


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1910

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George J. Haller & Co. - Ann Arbor - 1910

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Re: American Fraternity, College, Military Badge/Pin Makers

Postby dognose » Tue Mar 07, 2017 8:46 am

HALLER JEWELRY Co.

State Street, Detroit


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Haller Jewelry Co. - Detroit - 1915

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Haller Jewelry Company - Detroit - 1916

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Re: American Fraternity, College, Military Badge/Pin Makers

Postby dognose » Thu Mar 16, 2017 7:01 am

GREENDUCK METAL STAMPING Co.

Chicago


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Greenduck Metal Stamping Co. - Chicago - 1922

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Re: American Fraternity, College, Military Badge/Pin Makers

Postby dognose » Fri Apr 07, 2017 6:45 am

LANGROCK BROTHERS

301-307, East 22nd Street, New York


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Langrock Bros. - New York - 1909

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Re: American Fraternity, College, Military Badge/Pin Makers

Postby dognose » Wed Apr 12, 2017 7:15 am

I. BEDICHIMER & Co.

1200-02, Walnut Street, Philadelphia


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I. Bedichimer & Co. - Philadelphia - 1909

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Re: American Fraternity, College, Military Badge/Pin Makers

Postby dognose » Mon May 22, 2017 5:01 am

W.H. MORTIMER

Pottsville, Pennsylvania


W. H. Mortimer, Pottsville, Pa., has received the contract for manufacturing 500 solid gold badges for the German Catholic Benevolent Union, of Schuylkill County.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 31st August 1892

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Re: American Fraternity, College, Military Badge/Pin Makers

Postby dognose » Thu Jun 01, 2017 4:49 am

THE KINNEY COMPANY

14, Blount Street, Providence, Rhode Island


Examples of the work and mark of the Kinney Company:

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The Kinney Company - Providence, R.I. - 1907

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Re: American Fraternity, College, Military Badge/Pin Makers

Postby dognose » Thu Jun 15, 2017 2:43 am

PETER McDONALD

Newark, New Jersey


NEWARK

Peter McDonald, late with the Thomas J. Dunn Co., of New York, started in business here with George J. Bessinger, in the Richardson Building, making gold badges, emblems, etc.


Source: The Metal Industry - January 1913

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Re: American Fraternity, College, Military Badge/Pin Makers

Postby dognose » Tue Jun 20, 2017 2:50 am

WHITEHEAD & HOAG

Washington Street, later, Sussex Street, Newark, New Jersey



A tract of land at Sussex Ave., First and Dickerson Sts., Newark, N. J., has been purchased by the Whitehead & Hoag Company of that city and a large plant will be erected upon it. This company is one of the largest manufacturers of metal badges in the country and have an extensive plating department.

Source: The Brass World and Platers' Guide - April 1910


The Whitehead & Hoag Company have disposed of their plant in Washington street and their new factory is being rushed to completion, at Sussex avenue. It is a five-story, reinforced concrete building, 250 feet long, for the manufacture of brass, bronze, gold and silver badges, emblems, novelties, etc., also using considerable celluloid.

Source: The Metal Industry - December 1913

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Re: American Fraternity, College, Military Badge/Pin Makers

Postby dognose » Wed Jun 21, 2017 5:35 am

F.A. BALTHIS

Main Street, Charlottesville, Virginia


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F.A. Balthis - Charlottesville, Va. - 1886

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Re: American Fraternity, College, Military Badge/Pin Makers

Postby dognose » Thu Jun 22, 2017 4:24 am

JOHN B. KIRBY

316, Chapel Street, New Haven, Connecticut


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John B. Kirby - New Haven, Conn. - 1869

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Re: American Fraternity, College, Military Badge/Pin Makers

Postby dognose » Sun Jul 16, 2017 7:17 am

J.H. WILSON Co. Ltd.

Arch Street, Philadelphia


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J.H. Wilson Co. Ltd. - Philadelphia - 1905

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