Information on the Forgery of British Hallmarks

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dognose
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Re: Information on the Forgery of British Hallmarks

Postby dognose » Tue Jun 04, 2019 4:16 am

WILLIAM WYATT - CHARLES RIMER

Birmingham


THE GREED OF GAIN

TAMPERING WITH THE HALL-MARK


At Birmingham Assizes to-day Wm. Wyatt and Charles Rimer, manufacturing jewellers, were sentenced by Baron Pollock to fourteen months' hard labour for feloniously transposing the hall-mark of the Birmingham assay authorities by placing the 18ct. and 15ct. marks on an article of jewellery of an inferior quality. The Judge said the offence was a most serious one, and was purposely committed for the greed of gain.


Source: South Wales Echo - 17th March 1897

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dognose
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Re: Information on the Forgery of British Hallmarks

Postby dognose » Thu Aug 08, 2019 3:11 am

WALTER ROBERTS - WILLIAM CANTLE

London


At the Clerkenwell Police Court, on Monday, Walter Roberts, an engraver, and William Cantle, a brass finisher, were charged with feloniously marking certain articles of jewellery by counterfeiting the mark of the Goldsmiths' Company. Several cases were proved in which the prisoners had stamped the mark of the company on chains, watches, an rings, and they were remanded without bail.

Source: The Monmouthshire Merlin and South Wales Advertiser - 28th January 1881


See: viewtopic.php?f=38&t=36614&p=155249&hilit=roberts#p155249

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dognose
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Re: Information on the Forgery of British Hallmarks

Postby dognose » Wed Nov 06, 2019 5:12 am

ROBERT WILLIS

London


FORGING THE GOLDSMITHS' HALL MARK

HEAVY PENALTY


At the Old Bailey, London, on Monday, Robert Willis, aged 27, was sentenced to six years' penal servitude for forging the Goldsmiths' hall mark to a silver gilt watch, and passing it off as a valuable gold one.


Source: The Weekly Mail - 26th September 1885

See: viewtopic.php?f=38&t=36614&p=104645&hilit=willis&sid=aef4dd213f448fc9032b0394c7336d60#p104645

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dognose
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Re: Information on the Forgery of British Hallmarks

Postby dognose » Fri Feb 28, 2020 5:41 am

JOSEPH ADELMAN

Withy Grove, Manchester


CHESTER HALLMARK - CHARGE AGAINST A JEWELLER

Joseph Adelman, a manufacturing jeweller at Withy Grove, Manchester, was on Monday charged before Mr. Brierley, the stipendiary magistrate, at the City Police Court, with having transposed certain hallmarks from gold rings to other rings, of inferior quality, with intent to defraud; and also with having "uttered" rings which bore the hallmarks so transposed.

Mr. Cobbett, who appeared to prosecute, said the proceedings were taken at the instance of Mr. J.F. Lowe, of Chester, the Master of Assays there, and the principal officer of the Company goldsmiths of Chester. The charge against Adelman was, in substance, that he had removed from a number of gold rings the mark of the company's die indicating that the gold was of the quality of 18 carats, and transposed the mark to other articles of gold ware. The offence was one created by statute, and was punishable as a felonv. There was another information which charged the prisoner with having "feloniously uttered" two gold rings into which the hallmark had been transposed from other rings on which they had been originally impressed by the Assay officers. This prosecution had been instituted upon information received by these officers that the accused was carrying on this kind of business extensively. On the 9th March two gold rings were purchased at his establishment - he himself being the vendor — which on being subjected to the usual tests were found to bear hallmarks which had been transposed from other rings of standard quality. Eight of these rings were assayed. In one ring the parts to which the hallmark had been transposed were of correct quality, the remaining seven being below the quality of the transposed parts bearing the hall-marks, one ring being only 15 carats. On Friday last, on the information of the Master of Assay, a search warrant was applied for and granted, under which nineteen rings were seized on the defendant's premises. Of these eight were found to bear transposed hallmarks, and out of those eight seven were of 15-carat gold only. The prisoner had only been arrested that morning, and a long remand would be necessary, as the case was one that would require some elaboration.

Evidence with regard to the arrest and the execution of the search warrant was given by Inspector Hough, and the accused was then remanded until Tuesday next, the magistrate expressing his willingness to accept bail in two sureties of £100 each.


Source: The Chester Courant - 5th April 1905


THE HALLMARK CASE - COMMITTAL OF THE ACCUSED

Joseph Adelman, in business as a manufacturing jeweller at premises in Withy Grove, appeared again last week, before Mr. Brierley, the stipendiary magistrate, at the Minshull-street Court, Manchester. He was charged with transposing the hall-marks from certain articles of goldware to other similar articles of the same or inferior value, with having in his possession gold rings the hallmarks on which had been so transposed, and with uttering gold rings of the same character, in contravention of the Goldsmiths Act. The bulk of the evidence in support of the charge was taken at a former sitting. The only witness on Tuesday was a working jeweller, formerly employed by the defendant, who spoke to seeing gold strips which had been stamped with the defendant's name mark being sent to the Assay Office at Chester and being returned bearing the official hallmarks. These strips represented the condition of 18-carat gold which had to be cut up and made into rings (each ring bearing its own hall-mark); but Adelman's practice, the witness said, was to cut out the hall-marks and solder them into gold rings which were generally of inferior standard. He did a considerable business, turning out about three dozen rings a week. The money gain per ring by this practice would not amount to more than 6d. to 1s. The defendant, when the witness first went to him, had four workmen and several apprentices. Most of them were engaged at various times in this work of transposing hallmarks. The witness added that he had himself done it, under Adelman's direction. The defendant was committed for trial at the assizes, the same bail as before being accepted.


Source: The Chester Courant - 26th April 1905

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