The Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

For information you'd like to share - Post it here - not for questions
dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42934
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed May 21, 2014 4:25 am

ALLAN ADLER

Los Angeles, California


Grandfather Frank Gets Gift From 'Amos'

HOLLYWOOD - Freeman Gosden, the Amos of the original Amos 'n' Andy, anticipated the birth of pal Frank Sinatra's first grandchild.

Some months ago, Freeman and his wife Jane had silversmith Allan Adler create a sterling silver piece with the number 1 and the initials FAS.

On the day after the birth on May 22, Adler added the date of birth and the baby's name - Angela.

The Gosdens also did some anticipating for the parents, Nancy Jr. and Hugh Lambert. They commissioned Adler to make a gold-plated shadowbox picture frame with the baby' name and birthdate on it.


Source: Sarasota Journal - 20th June 1974

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42934
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu May 22, 2014 3:58 am

R. WALLACE & SONS MFG.Co.

Wallingford, Conn.

The magnificent sterling silver flatware service to be given by the members of the New York Athletic Club to George Goldie, the retiring athletic instructor, is the product of the R. Wallace & Sons Mfg. Co., Wallingford, Conn. The service consisting of 103 pieces,in the chaste and artistic "Waverley" pattern ,is arranged in a beautiful metal bound chest of oak bearing a tablet with the inscription, " Presented to George Goldie, by the Members of the N. Y. Athletic Club, October, 1893." On each piece is engraved the letter G. The committee having the presentation in charge made a thorough examination of the work of various firms before awarding the palm to the R. Wallace & Sons Mfg. Co. To those familiar with the delicate grace and beauty of the "Waverley" pattern, it is unnecessary to say that the committee is more than satisfied with their selection.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 1st November 1893

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42934
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri May 23, 2014 5:39 am

GENERAL DOUGLAS MacARTHUR

Philippines

Mac's Five-Star Insignia Beaten Out of Silver Coins

ALLIED HEADQUARTERS, Philippines, Dec. 26. (UP) - Gen. Douglas MacArthur today was wearing his new five-star insignia beaten out of a miscellaneous collection of Filipino, Dutch and Australian silver coins furnished by his aides.

The word that MacArthur had been promoted to the rank of general of the army posed a knotty problem. No such insignia as the five stars in a circle were available here.

A Filipino silversmith from Leyte township was called in for a hurry-up job, and instructed how to make the new badge. The coins showered down, and in record time he came up with two handmade insignia designating MacArthur's rank.


Source: Spokane Daily Chronicle - 26th December 1944

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42934
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat May 24, 2014 4:05 am

HENRY MUENZEN (Gorham Mfg. Co.)

ERNEST M. MUNROE (Julius Mamlock & Co.)



LAST TRIBUTE PAID

Two Young Men Who Made Supreme Sacrifice in World War Laid at Rest with Military Honors

Providence, R. I., July 30.–The last tributes were paid the past week to two young men associated with the manufacturing jewelry industry of this city who, as American soldiers, paid the supreme sacrifice overseas. Their bodies have been returned from France to find their final resting places in the homeland.

Former infantrymen, artillerymen and machine gunner comrades donned khaki again and formed the escort of honor to the military funeral services and later went to the cemeteries, where "Taps" was sounded for the last time for these Rhode Islanders whose names are enscrolled on the roll of fame.

Full military honors marked the funeral of Private Henry Muenzen, who at the time of his enlistment was employed by the Gorham Mfg. Co. He was a member of Company C, Machine Gun Battalion, Twenty-sixth Division, and his body was the first of the perished members of the unit to be returned from France. . He was a son of Mrs. Louise Muenzel, of 50 Dupont St., and died of pneumonia at a field hospital in Mouilly, France, shortly before the armistice was signed. His illness followed participation in several of the major engagements.

Members of Troop C. Rhode Island Cavalry, 45 members mounted under command of Lieut. Baird, and Sylvestre S. Payne Post, Veterans of Foreign Wars, united in paying tribute to the dead soldier's memory. Symbolic of the dead soldier, a riderless horse was led behind the hearse by one of the cavalrymen. Rev. John F. Reardon conducted the funeral services at the Church of the Assumption and burial was at St. Ann's Cemetery, where Commander Harold L. Bailey and other officers conducted the committal services in accordance with the ritual of the Veterans of Foreign Wars. Taps were sounded by Bugler Daniel Black, who was one of the dead man's instructors overseas.

Private Muenzel was born in Providence, Feb. 23, 1897, and was educated in the public schools and then entered the employ of the Gorham Mfg. Co. He joined Troop C of the Rhode Island Cavalry in the Spring of 1917, and remained with the outfit when it was changed to Company C, Machine Gun Battalion. He sailed for France, Oct. 3, 1917. Besides his mother he leaves five brothers and two sisters.

The funeral of Corp. Ernest M. Munroe. Battery A, One Hundred and Third Field Artillery, Twenty-sixth Division, was held at Calvary Baptist Church this city this afternoon at 2 o'clock. Rev. M. F. Bratcher, assistant pastor, conducting the services. Burial was in the family lot in North Burial Ground. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Munroe of 85 Dartmouth Ave. and died in a hospital at Bar-le-duc, France, of bronchial pneumonia on Dec. 23, 1918.

Upon leaving school he had worked for several years with Julius Mamlock & Co., precious stones. He enlisted in May, 1917, as a private in Battery A and sailed with that unit in October of the same year as first class gunner. He was promoted to corporal overseas and made battery clerk. He was born in Providence, Sept. 23, 1892, and obtained his education in the Providence public schools, graduating from the Messer Street Grammar School and studying for one year at the Technical High School. Besides his parents, Corp. Munroe is survived by one sister. He was a member of What Cheer Lodge of Masons and Swarts Lodge of Odd Fellows.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 3rd August 1921

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42934
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun May 25, 2014 7:53 am

MARTIN J. LEINING

Meriden, Conn.

Martin J. Leining

Martin J. Leining, 211 Reservoir Ave., died Tueday evening at the Meriden-Wallingford Hospital after a brief illness.

Born in Meriden, Nov. 3, 1887, son of the late George and Amelia (Glasnatt) Leining, he made his home in Meriden all of his life. Until his retirement he had been employed at Wallace Silversmith of Wallingford.

Survivors include has widow, Flora S. Leining; a son, Albert G. Leining, both of this city; a sister, Mrs. Edith Greenbacker also of Meriden; and several nieces and nephews.

Funeral services will be held Friday morning at 11 at the Flatow Home, 48, Cook Ave., with the Rev. John S. Kidder, pastor of the Immanuel Lutheran Church will officiate. Burial will be in Walnut Grove.


Source: The Morning Record - 16th August 1973

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42934
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon May 26, 2014 4:16 am

JOHN BALLY

Elmira, New York

Death of John Bally

Elmira, N. Y., Sept. 19.–John Bally, senior member of the jewelry house of John Bally & Son, 330 E. Water St., was buried to-day. Mr. Bally's death, which occurred Tuesday at his home, 311 Columbia St., was due to heart failure, superinduced by acute indigestion.

The deceased was a prominent citizen of this city as well as one of its oldest Jewelers. He was born in Geneva, Switzerland. July 16, 1827, and attended school and college in his native country. In early life he learned the trade of watchmaker, and when 21 years old he left Switzerland to seek his fortune in the United States.

He located first in New York, where he became employed as watchmaker by the old house of Ball, Black & Co., and shortly afterwards moved to Oswego, where he remained for about three years. During his stay in Oswego he married Miss Clara Dickinson, and later moved to Buckingham and finally to Deposit. In this last place he remained for 11 years, and during his stay there his wife died, and he subsequently married Miss Harriet Marvin.

Toward the latter part of the Civil War Mr. Bally joined the 144th New York Volunteers and served until 1865. After the war Mr. Bally moved to Elmira, which city was his home for the remainder of his life. The firm of John Bally & Son, of which Louis E. Bally, Jr., is a member, was the one interest to which the deceased devoted all his energy until he retired from business a short time ago. Besides being a practical jeweler and a successful merchant, Mr. Bally was also an artist of considerable ability.

The deceased was a Mason, was a member of the Patriarchs' Club, and was one of the oldest members of the Park Church. He is survived by his seven children– four sons and three daughters.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 24th September 1902

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42934
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue May 27, 2014 3:48 am

SMITH FRENCH

Wabash, Indiana

Smith French of Wabash, 72 years old, died of pneumonia. Mr. French was the oldest silversmith in Wabash County. He leaves considerable property.

Source: Bluffton Chronicle - 10th March 1892

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42934
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed May 28, 2014 4:55 am

JOHN JEPSON

Meriden Britannia Co.


Meriden Britannia Co.'s Esteemed Superintendent Passes Away

Meriden, Conn., Nov. 18.–John Jepson, for twenty-two years superintendent of the Meriden Britannia Co.'s factory, died Tuesday morning at his home, aged 67. Death was due to heart troubles and dropsy. Mr. Jepson was obliged to give up work a year ago last June, and since the death of his wife a year ago this month he has been slowly failing.

Mr. Jepson was born in Birmingham, Eng., and came to this country 47 years ago. He first located in Boston, and from there went to Chicopee, Mass., where for many years he was prominently connected with the Ames company. He came to Meriden 22 years ago, and from that time up to last June he held the responsible position of superintendent of the Britannia shop. He was most conscientious in all his business transactions and was held in the highest esteem by the late Horace C. Wilcox.

The funeral took place to-day, and was attended by a large representation of the Meriden Britannia Co.'s officials and employes, also of St. Elmo Commandery, Knights Templar, and Charles Dickens Sons of St. George, and Wilson Lodge, Knights of Honor.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 22nd November 1893

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42934
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu May 29, 2014 4:00 am

ARTHUR WILLIAMS

Gorham Mfg.Co.

Model For 'Doughboy' War I Statue Is Dead

The man who served as a model for the World War I Memorial at East Main and Broad St., Arthur Williams, died Wednesday at the age of 74 in Brunswick, Me.

Williams was selected as a model for the doughboy statue by the sculptor Aristide B. Clanfarani in Providence, R.I. Williams was employed as a silversmith by the Gorham Co. in Providence. He was selected from 30 applicants.

A native of East Providence, Williams was a veteran of World War I and served in France with the 66th Division. He was also attached to the Coast Artillery.

Williams is survived by his wife, the former Catherine Urquhart of Augusta, Me., two stepsons and two sisters.

Funeral services will be held Saturday at 2 p.m. at the Stetson Funeral Home, Brunswick. Burial will be in Augusta.

The war memorial was commissioned in 1930 with the Gorham Co. as successful contractor for the memorial, at a cost of $56,800.

Clanfarani designed the four bronze figures, which include the Red Cross nurse, a marine, a sailor and the soldier for which Williams posed.

Williams saw the finished work in 1957 when he visited a friend in Hamden, John H. Sherin, who spent his summers near Brunswick.


Source: The Morning Record - 12th March 1965

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42934
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri May 30, 2014 4:20 am

CHARLES A. KEENE

New York


CASE UNDER SILVER LAW

New York Jeweler Held to Answer Charge of Selling Buckle Marked "Sterling," Which Assayed Below the Standard

The campaign against alleged violators of the New York Stamping Law by the Good and Welfare Committee of the National Jewelers Board of Trade and other organizations in the industry working with the Bureau of Weights and Measures is still continuing actively. The latest development in this campaign was the summons served on Charles A. Keene, jeweler at 180 Broadway, New York, and a saleswoman to answer a charge of selling a belt buckle marked "sterling," which it is claimed does not assay up to the mark required by law.

On Tuesday, May 2, after The Jewelers' Circular had gone to press, Mr. Keene and the saleswoman who, it is claimed, sold the buckle to Inspector Thomas F. Morgan of the Bureau of Weights and Measures, were brought before Magistrate Corrigan in the First District Magistrate's Court at which time both defendants pleaded not guilty. A hearing of the case was held immediately after, at which time Inspector Morgan testified that on April 20 he purchased two silver belt buckles marked "sterling" for 38 cents each. Mr. Biglin, who accompanied Mr. Morgan to the Keene store at the time he made the purchase substantiated the former witness's testimony. B. G. Shields, United States Assayer, was also called as a witness and stated that the buckle which he assayed showed .656 pure silver. It was brought out at the hearing that a belt buckle sold as "sterling" must contain, under the law of New York State, .925 pure silver.

Henry S. Goodspeed, attorney for Mr. Keene, argued at the hearing that the mark "sterling" which appeared on the belt buckle only applied to that part so marked and did not apply to the cam and other parts. Magistrate Corrigan, however, held both defendants for the Court of Special Sessions under $25 bail each.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 10th May 1922

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42934
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat May 31, 2014 3:45 am

ALLAN ADLER

Los Angeles, California

Allan Alder

Allan Adler, 86, who became known as "silversmith to the stars" and was commissioned to design crowns for Miss Universe and mini-Oscars for Acadamy Award winners, died of a stroke Tuesday in Burbank, Calif.

Alder was known for designing silverware and holloware in geometric shapes that were inspired by the Modernist art movement of the early 1900's. His craft attracted actors and actresses, several of whom took private silversmith lessons from him, including Katrhrine Hepburn, who occasionally worked in his shop.

He popularity landed him high-profile jobs, such as designing crowns for Miss Universe and Miss U.S.A., as well as silver bowls, candlesticks and goblets for his celebrity clientèle.

Heads of state were among his admirers. Adler designed a silver coffee urn to be used at a fund-raising event for John F. Kennedy during his successful 1960 presidential campaign. Later, he designed a silver hair-brush for Winston Churchill.

Other items he made included a silver belt for singer Michael Jackson and a silver lunch-box for Carol Channing, who carried the tin to banquets and award shows.

His work also earned him honorary awards from the Smithsonian Institution and the Museum of Modern Art.


Source: Sarasota Herald Tribune - 7th December 2002

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42934
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Jun 01, 2014 6:48 am

ENOS RICHARDSON

Retirement of Enos Richardson

After Over a Half Century of Active Life In tbe Jewelry Trade Enos Richardson Retires

The announcement was made Friday that Enos Richardson, who is, with perhaps one exception, the oldest manufacturing jeweler in the country, had retired from the business with which he had been connected for over half a century. Mr. Richardson's retirement practically dates from the first of the year and ended a career in the jewelry business lasting over 60 years.

Enos Richardson was born in Attleboro. Mass., in 1819. and when 18 years old left his home in that town to go to Philadelphia. Here in 1837 he started to learn the jewelry trade with Thomas Garrett, but before he had completed his apprenticeship, his employer, recognizing the mercantile ability which he showed, made Mr. Richardson a salesman. Later Mr. Richardson became a salesman for Harvey M. Richards, and finally in 1841-he became a member of the firm of Daggett, Robinson & Co.. manufacturing jewelers. Attleboro. This firm were shortly afterward succeeded by Daggett & Richardson, who established an office in New York, in Cortlandt St.

In 1847 Mr. Richardson formed a partnership with John D. Palmer and others, and the firm of Palmer, Richardson & Co. continued the business. The next year, 1848, the firm moved their office to 23 Maiden Lane and became one of the pioneers in what is now the jewelry district of New York. Palmer, Richardson & Co. continued until 1866. when they were succeeded by Enos Richardson & Co., under which style the business has been conducted ever since. For the past nine years the business has been conducted solely by Mr. Richardson and his son, Frank H. Richardson, who was admitted as a partner in 1866. and who will now continue it alone under the same firm name.

During the early part of his business career Mr. Richardson manufactured cheap jewelry and then went into the manufacture of better grades as well. Since 1866 his firm have made solid gold jewelry exclusively. The first factory was in Attleboro, but in 1848 another was established in Newark. N. J., where it has since remained and where the firm became the first to use steam power in the manufacture of jewelry.

As a salesman, in his early life, before the days of western railroads, Mr. Richardson traveled all over the country and was known personally to the entire trade. Later he confined himself to the New York office, and since 1886 has taken but little active part in the running of the business. Of the organizations in the trade, Mr. Richardson was actively connected with but two, the Jewelers' Safety Fund Society and the Jewelers' Protective Union, both of which he helped to organize. Few men in any line of business can boast of such a long, honorable and active business life as that which Mr. Richardson has experienced, and his retirement comes as a capstone to a career which will long stand as an example of what energy, honesty and integrity can accomplish in business.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 18th January 1899

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42934
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Jun 02, 2014 3:46 am

BARRY LANGFORD

Brighton, England

London, Eng. Silversmith Barry Langford agreed to make a lecture tour of British prisons on "How to collect silver safely." At the same time, thieves broke into his empty home in Brighton, 50 miles away, and made off with $1,680 in silver and jewels.

Source: The Montreal Gazette - 13th June 1960

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42934
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Jun 03, 2014 5:18 am

FRANK T. EAST

Pittsburgh


A FATAL ACCIDENT

Frank T. East, Pittsburgh, Pa., Dies From Injuries Caused by Being Hit by an Automobile

Pittsburgh, Pa., Jan. 28.–Frank T. East, treasurer of the Jewelers' 24-Karat Club of this city, died shortly before noon today, the result of being struck by an automobile at 7.30 o'clock this morning in front of his home, 630 Lincoln Ave., Bellevue, while on his way to work. The announcement of his sudden death was a great shock to his friends. President Samuel F. Sipe, of the Jewelers' 24-Karat Club, requested Secretary Frank Burger to represent the organization in expressing the condolences of its members.

Mr. East had just left his home and had started to run to catch an approaching street car, just across the street from his home. The sidewalk leading to the street was slippery, and he gained such momentum he could not stop. An automobile approaching toward Ben Avon and owned by R. L. Thompson, Jr., and going west, struck him before the driver of the machine could stop. Mr. East was struck with great force. He was carried to the office of Dr. J. S. Donaldson, close by, who sent him to the Suburban General Hospital in Bellevue as soon as an ambulance could be called. No hope was given his family for his recovery.

Bruised and bleeding the man was taken into the hospital, where it was found his injuries were of such a nature his life could not be spared, and he died at 11.30 A. M., about four hours after the accident. Mr. East had lived in Bellevue all of his life, being one of the oldest residents of the borough and the first white child born in that suburb upon its incorporation as a borough in 1867.

For nearly a quarter of a century Mr. East had been associated with the house of E. P. Roberts & Sons, but since that house went out of business he had maintained an engraving department of his own in the Keenan building. He had been the treasurer since its organization, of the Jewelers' 24-Karat Club, of which Steele F. Roberts, the founder, was the first president and Mr. East's employer at that time.

The deceased was prominent in Sundayschool work and was the district president of the Allegheny County Sunday School Association and had for 20 years been superintendent of the Sunday School of the Bellevue Methodist Protestant Church of which he was a member. He was also a member of Bellevue lodge of Masons, the Patriotic League and other organizations.

He was 52 years old and leaves his widow and a brother with whom he made his home.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 4th February 1920

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42934
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Jun 04, 2014 5:55 am

ADOLFO ORTIZ

Santa Fe, N.M.

Silversmith Keeps Filigree Artistry Alive

By Robert E. Huber

Santa Fe, N.M. (UPI) - A 70-year-old Santa Fe silversmith may be the nation's last remaining filigree artist.

Adolfo Ortiz, of Santa Fe, who learned silversmithing from his father, says the age-old art is dying. "It takes too long to make a piece. The profit is not enough," he said.

Ortiz learned his trade from his father, Francisco Ortiz y Baca in 1909. "In those days, there were more than 50 filigree makers in Santa Fe alone." he said.

Filigree came to the New World with the Spanish followers of Cortez and Coronado. Those artisans created silver and gold birds, butterflies, flowers, fish, leaves and tiny threaded sculptures for jewelry.

The work done today by Ortiz in his tiny shop on Don Gaspar street is the same done 400 years ago in Spain. Ting metal threads of gold and silver are woven together to form exquisite flowers or butterflies. Ortiz' use of an acetylene torch is the only change.

The most expensive work done by Ortiz costs $150 - a necklace that takes him two weeks to finish. The average piece in his shop costs $15.

At his cluttered work-bench, Ortiz today wears magnifying glasses to see his work. But his 70-year-old fingers are still nimble enough to handle the tiny silver threads that are only thousandths of an inch in thickness.

"The art is dying out." Ortiz said. "My brother knows how but he hasn't done any filigree in seven or eight years. The tourists want little gifts, not fine jewelry."

The passing of the filigraneros, the term used by Medieval guilds for the artisans, began with machine-made jewelry about 60 years ago.


Source: Reading Eagle - 30th January 1965

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42934
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Jun 05, 2014 3:57 am

THE HOPE DIAMOND

Famous Hope Blue Diamond Sold In Paris for the Joseph Frankel's Sons Co.

A cable dispatch received in this city from Paris Monday said that dealers acting on behalf of the owners announce that they have sold the famous Hope blue diamond for $400,000 to a dealer. It is understood that it was bought for the Sultan of Turkey.

The Hope diamond, which is one of the most famous gems of the world and weighs 44¾ carats, was bought some years ago by Joseph Frankel's Sons, of New York. When asked yesterday about the report from London Simon Frankel, head of the Joseph Frankel's Sons Co., stated that it was true as far as the sale was concerned, as the gem had been sold in Paris Saturday for his concern. As to who the purchaser was or the price paid for the gem Mr. Frankel said he could not properly make this public, and that the information must come from the purchaser himself. As to the price he could only say that it realized a substantial sum, and the reports in some papers that it had been sold as low as $100,000 were ridiculous on their face. Whether or no the report that $400,000 was the price was true or not he could not say.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 6th May 1908

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42934
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Jun 06, 2014 3:29 am

BARON ERIK FLEMING

Stockholm

Stockholm's Gift to Paris

Stockholm's gift to the City of Paris now celebrating it's 2,000th anniversary is a magnificent goblet made out of three kilogrammes of silver and crowned by St. Erik Stockholm's patron. The Goblet, which was handed over to Mayor Pierre de Gaulle by Carl-Albert Anderson, president of the Stockholm Municipal Council, was designed by the famous silversmith Baron Erik Fleming.


Source: The Montreal Gazette - 28th July 1951

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42934
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Jun 07, 2014 3:05 am

LOUIS BERTHOUD

Holden, Missouri

Career of the Late Louis Berthoud

Holden, Mo., May 13–The death Friday last of Louis Berthoud, a pioneer jeweler of Holden, is generally regretted in the mercantile community owing to his long honorable career. Despite the fact that he had resided for 42 years in this town he had few intimate friends, and but little is known as to his life outside of his business career. Nothing is known of his family connections, but it is believed that he has no relatives.

The deceased, who was 78 years old, was a native of France, in which country he probably learned his trade as a jeweler. He was about 36 years old when he came to Holden, and after starting in the jewelry trade continued here as a jeweler and watchmaker successfully until his death. He lived in the rear of his store and was practically a recluse, having no friends but a former telegraph operator, "Billy" Miller, who induced him to come here. As a business man, however, he was popular and was noted for his ability as well as his many sterling qualities as a merchant. He was extremely charitable and a worthy call to him for aid never went unanswered.

Mr. Berthoud joined the Masonic fraternity about 34 years ago and was secretary of the local lodge for more than 30 years. He was a veteran of the Civil War, having served in Company F of the 38th Indiana Infantry. For the last 25 years Mr. Berthoud had not left Holden. A short time prior to his death he gave power of attorney to his brother Mason, who had his safe opened and an inventory of his assets made. So far as known all his property is willed to Mr. Miller.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 20th May 1908

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42934
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Jun 08, 2014 6:56 am

SIGMUND JOHAN KURTZ

Hanau, Germany

Silver Records Enter Museum

An unusual and very valuable collection of 17 volumes of silver pattern records will soon be sent by Otto Dingedein to a museum in Germany. The silver patterns are more than 100 years old and belonged to Sigmund Johan Kurtz of Hanaw, A/Main, Germany, a grandfather of Mr Dingeldein. Herr Sigmund founded a silver shop that is still in existence.

The records were brought to the United States in 1952 by Mr. Dingeldein's father, August Dingeldein, also a silversmith. The silver pattern books were not destroyed during World War II but the good books were burned in one of the bombing.


Source: Cape Girardeau Bulletin - 2nd December 1971

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42934
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Jun 09, 2014 3:22 am

EDMUND CHASE GIFFORD

Fall River, Massachusetts


Death of Edmund C. Gifford

Fall River, Mass., April 29.–Edmund C. Gifford, the head of the well-known jewelry concern known as Chas. E. Gifford & Co., at 13 N. Main St., died Sunday evening last in West Falmouth, and the news of his passing, though not unexpected, caused profound sorrow and regret not only among the members of the jewelry trade of this city, but throughout the east, as he was widely known and highly regarded both as a business man and as a jeweler. Mr. Gifford had suffered for some time with liver trouble, and in the hope of benefitting his condition by a rest, had gone to his Summer home in this city last March. The remains were brought to Fall River and the funeral services were held here yesterday.

Edmund Chase Gifford was a native of this city and was born March 10, 1852. He was a son of Ellis and Abby C. Gifford, and was one of 10 children. His father, who had a successful business as jeweler and silversmith on S. Main St., which he founded in 1836, educated the son to that trade, and young Mr. Gifford learned the business in his father's store. The father admitted an elder son, Charles E. Gifford, as partner, and after the death of the founder of the firm, Edmund C. Gifford became associated with his brother under the firm style of C. E. Gifford & Co. The firm, prospered and for many years the partnership continued without change until the death of Charles Gifford, March 20, 1895, since which time Edmund C. Gifford had been the sole owner of the business.

Deceased was married twice, first to Miss Edith Heywood Miles, of Worcester, who died July 26, 1888, and next to Miss Alice J. Flagg, of Chelsea. The latter and her three daughters together with a son, Ellis Gifford, by his first wife, survive.

Mr. Gifford, though he gave a large part of his time to his business, also devoted time and energy to other work. He was for many years a member of the Unitarian Society, and had much to do with all the large building operations of that organization, of which he was treasurer for about 15 years. He was one of the original members of the Fall River Merchants' Association and had been prominent in the latter body both as a member and officer. He was a man of quiet habits and strong domestic tendencies and was noted for his remarkable good taste. He was extremely fond of good literature, and in fact had all the attributes of the ideal type of the New England merchant and gentleman.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 6th May 1908

Trev.


Return to “Contributors' Notes”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 11 guests