The Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

For information you'd like to share - Post it here - not for questions
dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41035
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Apr 24, 2014 4:14 am

SARAH COVENTRY

Glenrothes, Fife

Jewellery Factory Closes

The jobs of 48 jewellery workers have been lost with the closure of the Sarah Coventry factory in Glenrothes, Fife.

Hopes that the jobs could be saved were dashed yesterday when the company said it would cease trading from its European headquarters in the new town on November 2.

The company had continued trading from the factory after a previous deadline had passed in the hope that a bid from a prospective buyer would save the plant.

There is, however, a slender hope that a buyer can still be found for Sarah Coventry's sister company, Allart Ltd, which also trades from Glenrothes. The 49 employees there will remain in jobs until December and the Manager, Mr Charles Hutchings, said the outlook was optimistic.

The decision to close the two factories was taken in the United Stated by the board of the parent company, C.H. Stuart Inc, which set up the Glenrothes operations in 1967.


Source: The Glasgow Herald - 25th October 1979

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41035
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Apr 25, 2014 5:22 am

GEORGE C. EDWARDS

Holmes & Edwards Silver Co. - Bridgeport Chain Co. - International Silver Co.


DEATH OF GEORGE C. EDWARDS

Vice-President of the International Silver Co. Passes Away After a Long Illness

Bridgeport, Conn., Sept. 24.–An illness lasting over a year finally terminated in the death yesterday of George C. Edwards, vice-president of the International Silver Co. at his home 174 Park Place, this city. Mr. Edwards underwent an operation in May, 1918, and since that time his health had been impaired. Funeral services will take place at 3 o'clock to-morrow afternoon at the Trinity Episcopal Church, Broad St. and Fairfield Ave. Following the services, at which Rev. F. E. Aitken will officiate, the remains will be laid at rest in Mountain Grove Cemetery.

Mr. Edwards was a modest and retiring man and from the moment of his entrance into the silver trade he made friends, who regret very deeply to hear of his death. He was well liked by everyone who knew him and was one of Bridgeport's most prominent citizens. Out of respect for the late Mr. Edwards the entire factory and office will be closed at noon on Thursday. Many of the officials and employes of the plant will attend the services to-morrow afternoon.

George C. Edwards was born in Watertown, Conn., in 1846. He received his early schooling in that town and graduated from the Watertown Academy. When a young man he became interested in the chemical manufacturing business in Watertown. Following his venture in Watertown he went to Binghamton, N. Y., where he conducted a wood alcohol business. After disposing of this enterprise he located in New York, where he became engaged with his brother-in-law, Charles Holmes, in the manufacture of nickel silver alloys. In January, 1880, the Rogers & Brittin Silver Co. was established at Bridgeport, Conn., and the following year George C. Edwards and C. E. L. Holmes purchased the controlling interest. In 1882 the Holmes & Edwards Silver Co. was organized and took over the stock and assets of the Rogers & Brittin Silver Co. Mr. Edwards was soon made treasurer and general manager of the firm, and upon the death of Mr. Holmes in 1884 he succeeded to the presidency. At the annual meeting in 1885 he was elected to the office of president.

The Holmes & Edwards Silver Co. soon won a place for itself in the flatware trade and established an excellent reputation in its various lines, especially in the silver inlaid line which has long been recognized throughout the country. The deceased, as the head of the company, was active in the formation of the International Silver Co., and upon its establishment Mr. Edwards was elected first vice-president. He had also been manager of the plant (Factory C) since the organization of the International Silver Co.

About 25 years ago Mr. Edwards also founded the Bridgeport Chain Co., of which concern he was president at the time of his death. He was also interested in electric light and power companies in Minnesota.

Mr. Edwards was a director in the City National Bank and was also a trustee of the Bridgeport Savings Bank. For many years he had also been a member of Trinity Episcopal Church, acting as vestryman and junior warden.

Besides his widow, Mr. Edwards leaves a son, George H. Edwards, who is associated with the International Silver Co. and is also a director of that well known concern.

At the meeting of the board of directors of the International Silver Co., on Sept. 24, the following resolutions relating to the death of Mr. Edwards, were unanimously adopted:

"Mr. George C. Edwards, one of the most active organizers and founders of the International Silver Co., and its predecessor, the Holmes & Edwards Silver Co., one of the best known men in the silver-plating industry, associated with and actively interested in this company as vice-president, since its organization in 1898, has been called from his work to his eternal rest.

"Voted: That we place upon the records of the company, our appreciation of his ability and sterling character. Active in the affairs of the company since its organization, his advice and decisions have added greatly to its success. Though suffering intensely in late years, he has kept in close touch with its affairs and has ever been indefatigable in his work for its benefit and loyal to its interests, and we record here with deep sorrow and great regret, his passing away on Tuesday, Sept. 23, 1919, at the age of 73 years.

"Voted: That out of respect to his memory, Factory C (the Holmes & Edwards plant) and the general offices of the company, be closed on the afternoon of the funeral, and that these resolutions be spread upon the records of the company and a copy sent to the family.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 1st October 1919


DEATHS

George C. Edwards, vice-president of the International Silver Company in Bridgeport, Conn., and founder of the Bridgeport Chain Company, died at his home, 174 Park Place. Tuesday. September 23, after an illness of over a year’s duration. Mr. Edwards underwent an operation in May, 1918, and since that time has been in an enfeebled condition. The operation was said to have hastened his death.

Mr. Edwards was born in Watertown, Conn., in 1846, and attended the schools of that city, graduating from the Watertown Academy, in his early twenties he became interested in the chemical manufacturing business in Waterbury and was for some time located there.

Leaving Waterbury, he went to Binghampton, N. Y., where he became one of the pioneers in the manufacture of wood alcohol in this country and built up a profitable business. This business he later sold out and went to New York City, where he became interested in the manufacture of nickel silver alloys with his brother-in-law, Charles Holmes.

Later Mr. Edwards and his brother-in-law bought the Rogers and Britten Company in Bridgeport and founded the Holmes and Edwards Company in 1881. The company continued under this name until the formation of the International Silver Company in 1898, Mr. Edwards being since that time its first vice-president.

About 25 years ago Mr. Edwards founded the Bridgeport Chain Company and was president of this concern at the time of his death. He was also interested in light and power companies in Minnesota some of which he founded.

Mr. Edwards was a director in the City National Bank and a trustee in the Bridgeport Savings Bank. He was for many years a member of the Trinity Episcopal Church, where he was vestryman and warden.


Source: The Metal Industry - December 1919

Trev.

silverly
moderator
Posts: 2899
Joined: Sun Nov 22, 2009 11:54 pm
Location: Virginia Beach, Virginia

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby silverly » Sat Apr 26, 2014 2:38 am

A Common Council holden in the Chamber
of the Guildhall of the City of London,
on Thursday the 18th
day of July 1878

Owden Mayor.

Resolved Unanimously
That the Freedom of this City
in a suitable Gold Box be presented to The Right Honorable
Benjamin Disraeli Earl of Beaconsfield Prime Minister
of England as a token of the high respect which the
Citizens of London have for the one who for so many years has
with patience, perseverance, and zeal excercised his great
abilities and talents for the welfare of his Country and in
testimony of this Court's appreciation of the genius and power
with which he has represented the British Nation in the
recent Berlin Congress the peaceful results of which this
Court earnestly trusts may continue for many years to come.
Monckton

Redemption
Compurgators
John Cox, Citizen & Clockmaker
Thomas Sidney, Alderman & Girdler
Benjamin Colls, Citizen and Fishmonger
William Case Fowler, Citizen and Founder
Mark Shephard, Citizen and Spectlemaker and
Thomas Henry Fry, a Citizen
Declare That The Right Honorable Benjamin Disraeli Earl of
Beaconsfield, Knight of the Most Noble order of the Garter
is a man of good name and fame, that his Lordship does not
desire the Freedom of this City whereby to defraud the Queen
or this City of any of their rights, customs, or advantages but
that he will pay his scot and bear his lot and so they all
say.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41035
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Apr 26, 2014 5:36 am

PROUDS

King Street, Sydney

JEWELLERS FINED $7,250

Prouds (1911) Pty Ltd, of King Street, yesterday pleaded guilty in the Special Federal Court to 15 charges of evading Customs duty.

Mr A.L. Anable, SM, fined the company a total of $7,250.

Mr J. Howard, for the Commonwealth, said 15 separate amounts of duty evaded totalled about $2,500.

The magistrate said that the facts established that over the years duty was evaded and in at least one group of amounts it could be said it was done systematically.


Source: The Sydney Morning Herald - 22nd December 1971

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41035
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Apr 27, 2014 5:19 am

FRANK R. CAPRON

Frank M. Whiting & Co.

Sudden Death of Frank R. Capron

North Attleboro, Mass., Oct. 23.– This morning the lifeless body of Frank R. Capron, the general manager of Frank M. Whiting & Co., silversmiths, was found by a friend in the reading room of the Business Men's Club. Mr. Capron worked until very late Saturday night, overseeing the installing of some new machinery. Sunday he went to a news stand, purchased a paper, and went to his club to read it. He fell asleep in his chair and that rest was changed into the eternal quiet. The cause of his death was given out by the medical examiner as apoplexy.

Mr. Capron had been a jeweler from earliest youth. Receiving a public school education, he entered the shop of the Whiting Mfg. Co. Though at the bottom of the industrial ladder, his brilliancy attracted attention and his rise was rapid. When W. D. Whiting took the plant to New York he followed, but returned after it had changed hands and the firm of Frank M. Whiting & Co. had been formed in North Attleboro. He became superintendent, and when F. M. Whiting died was one of the corporation to continue the business as the F. M. Whiting Co. He remained general manager and was the head of the firm until death claimed him. He was 54 years of age. brother to Henry E. Capron. of Sandland, Capron & Co., and of Mrs. E. I. Franklin. He was connected with the Good Fellows, Pilgrim Fathers, Red Men, Odd Fellows, and Knights of Pythias.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 26th October 1898

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41035
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Apr 28, 2014 3:34 am

GLASGOW GOLDSMITHS COMPANY

Glasgow

GLASGOW GOLDSMITHS COMPANY

The annual meeting of the Glasgow Goldsmiths Company was held in the Assay Office, 14, Mitchell Lane, yesterday, under the chairmanship of Mr James Weir. The reports for the year indicated that satisfactory progress had been made. The existing wardens, Messrs James Weir, Robert Scott, John Paisley, and Robert Johnston, were reappointed for the ensuing year.


Source: The Glasgow Herald - 5th July 1927

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41035
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Apr 29, 2014 2:56 am

OSAKA WATCH Co.

Japan

A member of the Japanese firm, the Osaka Watch Co., says in an interview published in the Japan Weekly Times, that while the wages paid to the workers in their factory are much lower than those paid by European or American firms, yet the business of watch making is not at all a paying one in Japan. For one thing, of course, the Japanese manufacturer said, the want of skill among the mechanics accounts for this fact. The employment of men at 40 or 50 sen a day would appear a very much more profitable method than paying nearly $3, which are the wages which western watch makers receive. But against that it may be said that as few as 10 of the latter will easily do work which would require 70 or 80 Japanese. The great objection, however, to Japanese workmen is said to be their want of moral fiber. You can simply not trust them with any piece of the precious metals. Hence the company are obliged to import the parts ready cut from abroad.

This company are the first in Japan who produced home made watches. They hired several Americans as teachers, paying them as much as 40,000 yen, and it is said that they have not yet recovered from the effect of this large outlay. Any attempt, therefore, on the part of foreign capitalists to avail themselves of the cheap labor of Japan will meet in this fact one of its greatest drawbacks.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 10th August 1898

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41035
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Apr 30, 2014 8:51 am

HERITAGE SILVERSMITHS Ltd.

Perth, Ontario

Receivers Take Over Perth Firm

By Steve Forster
Citizen corespondant

PERTH - The summer holidays of 85 employees of Heritage Silversmiths Ltd. may have a very unhappy ending.

The company has been forced into receivership by its banker during the annual two-week summer closure, and officials cannot say whether the doors will ever open again.

The decision wont be made on a return to work until a review of the company operations is completed, said John Page of receiver Price-Waterhouse Ltd.

The Rogers Road firm produces silver plating, gold plating, silver flatware and steel flatware.

Page said he's hopeful staff will be back on the job as scheduled Aug. 2.

A Heritage Silversmiths factory-outlet store in downtown Perth will definitely remain open, said Page.

Price-Waterhouse will be looking for a buyer for the company. "I have a feeling there is interest" Page said.


Source: Ottawa Citizen - 21st July 1983

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41035
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu May 01, 2014 2:43 am

WALTER F. RICE

Whiting Chain Co. - Whiting & Davis Co


DEATH OF WALTER F. RICE

Typhoid Fever Claims Prominent Eastern Manufacturer After a Short Illness

North Attleboro, Mass., Dec. 2.–Walter F. Rice, president of the Whiting Chain Co. and vice-president of the Whiting & Davis Co., died last evening at his home at Lake Archer, Wrentham, Mass. Death was due to typhoid fever.

The death of Mr. Rice was a shock to his host of friends. He was born in Saranac. N. Y., on April 4, 1889, and after attending the public schools in that place entered Dean Academy in Franklin, Mass., where he graduated. He accepted a position with R. Blackinton & Co., of North Attleboro, and later became associated with the Whiting & Davis Co.

He married Miss Whiting, daughter of Charles A. Whiting, president of the Whiting & Davis Co. In addition to the officers above named he was a director of the New England Jewelers' & Silversmiths' Association, a trustee of the Attleboro Savings Bank of North Attleboro, director of the Plainville Savings & Loan Association, member of the Excelsior Masonic Lodge of Franklin, member of the Royal Arch Chapter of Franklin.

The deceased was a young man of sterling qualities and of great promise and his untimely demise will be regretted by all who came in contact with him.

The funeral was held Monday afternoon.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 6th December 1922

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41035
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri May 02, 2014 3:21 am

EDWARD VIII's ABDICATION

Birmingham

CORONATION ORDERS CANCELLED

Many Birmingham firms engaged in special work for the Coronation stated yesterday that they had had big orders cancelled. Many have ceased work on these special lines and are simply continuing production on their normal basis.

Jewellery firms are the most affected, and an official of the Birmingham Jewellers' and Silversmiths' Association said that in the event of abdication the loss to that trade would be "colossal."

At one works the employees were not on overtime last night - the first time for two months. Work on Coronation goods has entirely ceased.


Source: The Glasgow Herald - 5th December 1936

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41035
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat May 03, 2014 7:07 am

JOSEPH MOULTON

Newburyport

Joseph Moulton of Newburyport

Mr. Joseph Moulton a retired business man of Newburyport, died Sunday afternoon in the same house in which he was born in 1814. He was a silversmith, an art inherited from his father, and practiced by his ancestors in the paternal line since the first Moulton came to Massachusetts from England in the early days of the settlement of Newbury. For several generations they were the principal silversmiths to the Commonwealth. Mr. Moulton accumulated a fortune and was noted for his liberal gifts to the poor. He was senior member of the Whitefield Congregational Church. He leaves a daughter and two sons.


Source: Boston Evening Transcript - 12th January 1903

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41035
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun May 04, 2014 4:57 am

ANDREW NORDHAGEN

Oakland

OAKLANDER GIVEN FIVE-YEAR TERM

By United Press

SAN FRANCISCO. Feb. 27. - Andrew Nordhagen, 52, Oakland silversmith was sentenced to five years in the Fedral Penitentiary after he pleaded guilty to possession and an attempt to pass four counterfeit 50 cent pieces.

Nordhagen, who was under suspicion of counterfeiting in 1926, but not arrested, claimed he found the counterfeit coins at the Ferry Building. When arrested he attempted to throw away three of the coins but was detected.


Source: Berkeley Daily Gazette - 27th February 1934

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41035
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon May 05, 2014 4:02 am

W. EDWARD FISKE

Howard Sterling Co.


Death of W. Edward Fiske

Providence, R. I., Oct. 24.–W. Edward Fiske, secretary of the Howard Sterling Co., died at his residence. 169 Waterman St., Sunday evening. Mr. Fiske was stricken with apoplexy Tuesday evening. He remained in a comatose condition from that time until Friday, when he partially regained consciousness and seemed for a short time to recognize his wife and, as sometimes happens in such cases, resumed talking at the point where he had stopped when attacked Tuesday night. In a short time he was seized with shock again and remained unconscious until he died.

W. Edward Fiske was born in Massachusetts and first came to this city as a student in Brown University. He attended college for two years, leaving to take the position of shipping clerk in the Providence office of the Winsor steamship line, where he remained but a short time. He entered the employ of Howard & Scherrible, manufacturing jewelers, as bookkeeper, and continued with the same concern through all its various changes as Howard & Scherrible. Howard & Son, Howard & Son Co.. and Howard Sterling Co., for 17 years, in fact up to the time of his demise. He was possessed of a most pleasant disposition and will be greatly missed.

Mr. Fiske was a prominent member of the Central Congregational Church of this city and was actively interested in church work. His interest in this and other matters outside his business will cause his death to be deeply regretted by many of the best people of Providence. His widow and three young children survive him.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 26th October 1898

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41035
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed May 14, 2014 2:11 pm

NATHAN LAWRENCE

Reed & Barton

Death of Nathan Lawrence

Taunton, Mass., Aug. 8.–The funeral of Nathan Lawrence, for half a century partner and superintendent in the great silver house of Reed & Barton, took place to-day. Rev. Thomas Edward Potterton, of the Universalist Church, in which Mr. Lawrence was deeply interested, officiated. From the factory employes and his associates and from hundreds of friends came beautiful flowers.

Mr. Lawrence was a native of Salem, Mass. At an early age he removed to Dorchester and learned the britannia worker's trade under Rosswell Gleason. He finished his apprenticeship and was in business for himself when Reed & Barton bought him out and made him superintendent of their works.

He took that position in 1847 and held it until advancing years compelled him to lay down active affairs six years ago. He had charge of the whole working force, 35 men, in 1847, and when he retired over 700 were on the pay-roll. Of the original 35 three are now living, J. W. Thayer, Edwin Reed and Edmund W. Porter.

Mr. Lawrence was married while in Dorchester to Miss Adeline Leach. Abbott F. Lawrence, treasurer of the Winthrop Mill; George D. Lawrence, traveling salesman for Reed & Barton, and now located for a time in Michigan, and Mrs. Edward B. Powers, of Taunton, were their children.

Mr. Lawrence lived in one of the most beautiful dwelling estates in the city.. He was. during the more active years of his life, a prominent member of King David Lodge of Masons.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 13th August 1902

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41035
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu May 15, 2014 8:29 am

DUKE OF KENT'S RING

Birmingham

DUKE OF KENT'S RING

Princess Marina has expressed a desire to give her husband a ring at their wedding in accordance with the custom of the Greek Church, and it has now been decided that this shall be done. The ring, a plain gold circlet, is being made in Birmingham by the Birmingham Jewellers' Association.

The Duke, as soon as the matter was decided, communicated with the Lord Mayor of Birmingham, and requested that the ring should be made in that city.


Source: The Glasgow Herald - 9th November 1934

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41035
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri May 16, 2014 5:53 am

MAJOR CHARLES W. BAILEY

Bailey, Banks & Biddle Co.


DEATH OF MAJOR C. W. BAILEY

Head of Philadelphia Jewelry Concern Succumbs to Heart Disease in Atlantic City, N. J., Home

Philadelphia, Pa., Dec. 10.–Major Charles W. Bailey, president of the Bailey, Banks & Biddle Co., jewelers on Chestnut St., died in Atlantic City yesterday. Death was due to heart disease.

Major Bailey was 61 years old. He became ill last September, and was apparently regaining his health. He went to the shore about two weeks ago.

He was the third member of the Bailey family in direct descent to engage in the business of manufacturing jewelry and silver in this city. Major Bailey devoted a great deal of his time to the manufacturing end of his firm's business. No arrangements for the funeral have been made. Major Bailey's home in this city was at the southeast corner of 16th and Locust Sts.

He was born in this city on Oct. 20, 1861. In April, 1884, he married Miss Anne Sloan, daughter of Andrew J. Sloan, a member of the old carpet concern of McCallum, Crease & Sloan. They had two daughters, Mrs. Emile Bailey Knowles and the Baroness Beatrice von Wullerstorff. The baroness died in Sept., 1921.

Ever since he entered business Major Bailey devoted all his time to manufacturing jewelry. He learned his trade with Edward S. Lawyer. He later formed a partnership with Lawyer under the firm name of Bailey & Lawyer. After Lawyer's death he continued the business under the name of E. S. Lawyer Co. He later became a member of the Bailey, Banks & Biddle Co., and when it was incorporated in 1894 he became vice-president and treasurer. After the death of his father, Joseph T. Bailey, he succeeded to the presidency.

In 1917 President Wilson appointed Mr. Bailey a major in the ordnance department. He resigned shortly afterwards to become a director of ship equipment in Hog Island. He resigned from this position on Jan. 1, 1919. Major Bailey was noted for his creative and building abilities. The 12-story factory of the firm on Sansom St., above 12th St., is said to be one of the best of its kind in the country.

Major Bailey spent the Summer on his estate at Hyannis on Cape Cod. He became ill about the middle of September. He was the owner of a majority of the stock in the company which was founded by his grandfather. The present Bailey, Banks & Biddle Co. is a descendant of the firm of Bailey & Kitchen, founded by Major Bailey's grandfather at 136 Chestnut St. in 1832. The firm remained under this name until 1846, when it became known as Bailey & Co. In 1859 its establishment was moved to 819 Chestnut St., remaining there until 1869, when it was removed to 12th and Chestnut Sts.

In 1878 the firm name was changed to Bailey, Banks & Biddle and in 1894 it became the Bailey, Banks & Biddle Co. In 1904 the store was moved to its present site at 1218-20-22 Chestnut St.

Major Bailey was very fond of boating, and was the owner of a houseboat, Peggy. He was frequently in southern waters, where he spent his Winters. He also had an estate of several hundred acres on the James river in Virginia which, during the war, was taken over by the government as an artillery proving ground and balloon school.

He was a member of the Art Club, Rittenhouse Club, Colonial Society of Pennsylvania, Corinthian Yacht Club, Philadelphia Country Club, Merion Cricket Club, Union League, Sons of the Revolution and the Military Order of Foreign Wars, Hyannis Port Yacht and Country Club, Metabetchouan Club of Canada, Sea View Golf Club, Chevy Chase Club of Washington, Bachelor's Barge Club, Atlantic Country Club, New York Yacht Club, Automobile Club of America, Army Athletic Association, and the Halifax River Yacht Club of Florida.

Major Bailey is also survived by a brother and sister, Joseph Trowbridge Bailey, of New York, and Mrs. Emile Bailey Aymar.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 13th December 1922

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41035
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat May 17, 2014 9:04 am

FRANK CLINTON COLE

Sarasota, Florida

FRANK C. COLE

Frank Clinton Cole, 95, of Sarasota Mobile Home Park, died Sunday afternoon.

Mr. Cole came to Sarasota in 1948 from Taunton, Mass., where he was born. He was a retired silversmith and a member of the Ionic Lodge, AF&AM, of Taunton. He is survived by a cousin, Mrs. Robert Nolan of Baltimore, Md.

Sarasota Lodge 147, F&AM, will conduct services Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. at Robarts Funeral Home, S. Links Ave. at Ringling Blvd. All Masons are requested to meet at the Temple at 6:45 p.m. Funeral services will be held Wednesday at 11 a.m. at the funeral home with Dr. John Thompson of the First Congregational Church officiating. Interment will be in Norton, Mass.

Friends may call this afternoon and evening.


Source: Sarasota Herald-Tribune - 6th February 1968

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41035
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun May 18, 2014 7:36 am

HOLMES & EDWARDS

One of the many interesting things that took place at the recent semi-annual convention of the Holmes & Edwards Silver Co. (Factory "C," International Silver Co.) selling organization, known as the Sales Fish Club, was a dinner known as "The Century Dinner" at the Brooklawn Country Club. The most successful pattern ever produced by this well-known organization was introduced last Fall, and known as the Century pattern, therefore the entire dinner was built around the century idea. At the "place cards" was a century imitation bank note. The center of the table was banked with a beautiful array of ferns, and outside of this wonderful centerpiece was grouped individual lamp posts, and a signal system which operated an electric railway on which a reproduction of The Century Limited was placed, emphasizing the 1923 slogan, "An Open Track for the Century." When the dinner was announced, the salesmen came into a darkened room with only the signal lights on the railroad and the headlights on the engine and lights in the cars showing. It was a beautiful sight, and greatly impressed all those who were privileged to attend. The railroad equipment for this spectacle was furnished through the courtesy of the H. C. Ives Mfg. Co., also located in Bridgeport, Conn. During the dinner the Century train was replaced with a freight train which served to distribute souvenirs, which were scarfpins reproducing the Century motif of design. During the dinner, those present were entertained by a radio concert. James G. Ludlum, general manager, presided at this dinner, and introduced W. B. Harrington, sales manager, who announced the winners of two contests which were conducted the past year. E F. Huxley, traveling in New York and Pennsylvania, won a money prize of gold for bringing in the largest number of new accounts in the last six months of 1922. Arthur E. Hall, who makes his headquarters in Minneapolis, won another money prize in gold for the largest increase in sales of Holmes & Edwards silver plate over the same period. This convention resulted in one of the best meetings of its kind ever held by the Holmes & Edwards selling organization, and all men were certain that with improved conditions the results for 1923 would be better than ever before. Among those present were A. E. Hall, J. T. Cunningham, E. H. Williams, E. F. Huxley, F. W. Riehl, E. J. Greulich, S. F. Swain, F. W. Rock, W. J. Hall, W. W. Browne, George Hughes, J. G. Ludlum, general manager; G. H. Edwards, assistant general manager; W. B. Harrington, sales manager; W. B. Griffin, advertising manager; R. Pieger and E. V. Law.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 31st January 1923

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41035
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon May 19, 2014 3:38 am

LESLIE DURBIN - REGINALD GLEADOWE - GEORGE HUGHES

KING'S INVESTITURE

George Medal For Apprentices

.........The three men primarily responsible for the Stalingrad Sword were also decorated. Mr Reginald Gleadowe, the designer, and Mr George Hughes, clerk of the Goldsmiths' Company, were made Commanders of the Royal Victorian Order, and Corporal Leslie Durbin, R.A.F., who carried out the silver work, was made a Member of the Fourth Class of the Order.

The King said that he was greatly pleased with the sword. He asked Durbin how long he had been a silversmith, and Durbin replied that he began to learn the craft at 13, and had been at it for 17 years. He spent four months working on the sword.


Source: The Glasgow Herald - 22nd October 1943

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 41035
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue May 20, 2014 5:10 am

A. L. SERCOMB

Meriden Britannia Company

Mr. A. L. Sercomb is just attaining his majority as manager of the Western branch of the Meriden Britannia Company. In 1875 he first accepted a position with that company in New York, and in 1878, twenty-one years ago, he came to Chicago to take up the position he still occupies.

Born in Milwaukee, Wis., in the summer of 1847, of English parentage, his early life was spent in that city. When the calls for volunteers came in the early sixties, nothing could prevent Sercomb's enlisting. He was really too young to be eligible, but he succeeded in joining the ranks of the 39th Wisconsin Volunteers. Returning to Milwaukee after the war, he went into the crockery and glassware business under the firm name of Santord & Sercomb. In 1870 he gave up this business and went to New York, where he identified himself for five years with the wholesale dry goods trade. In 1875, as we have said, he was engaged by the Meriden Britannia Company.

Mr. Sercomb is a man of many clubs. He has been president of the North Shore Club, and is a member of the Union League Club, the Citizens' Commercial Association, Apollo Commandery No. 1, K. T., Columbia Post, G. A. R., and other organizations.

Among fellow jewelers at Chicago he is well known and well liked. He has been president of the Chicago Jewelers' Association, and was chairman of the Reception Committee appointed for the last banquet.

His home, on the Lake Shore Drive, in Lake View, is one of the many beautiful residences of that fashionable neighborhood. The two sons who make up the family are both at St. Paul's School in Concord, N. H., and one of them has just passed his college examinations.

Mr. Sercomb and his wife have sailed for England and Europe for an extended trip. While in England they expect to look after Mr. Sercomb's connections there, and will return in ample time to look after fall business.


Source: Jewelers Review - 19th April 1899

Trev.


Return to “Contributors' Notes”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 8 guests