The Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Jan 15, 2020 5:26 am

BOSTON'S OLDEST SILVERSMITH

Boston, Massachusetts


George F. Hamilton, of Roxbury, Boston's oldest silversmith, died Jan. 24. He entered business 71 years ago. Born in Ireland, Sept. 6, 1833, he came to Boston at the age of five years. When a young man he joined the Boston Fire Department, running with the old hand tubs. In later years he was honored with the office of president of the Boston Veteran Firemen's Association. He was particularly well known in Roxbury, where he resided for many years. He is survived by his widow and two sons, Charles L. and George F. Hamilton. Funeral services were held from his late residence, Jan. 27.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 6th February 1924

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Jan 16, 2020 4:26 am

PLATINUM DELIVERY BY AEROPLANE

London


Transfer of large quantities of platinum by aeroplane from London to Paris has now become a regular thing, it being considered much safer and decidedly quicker than by sea transport. Usually only quantities averaging in value $10,000 have been carried by aeroplane but this week more than one hundredweight of the precious metal valued at around $250,000 was carried by air across the Channel. It was collected at a London bank before noon and delivered in Paris at 2:30 the afternoon of the same day.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 20th February 1924

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Jan 17, 2020 5:10 am

LORD DUDLEY'S PLATE

Dublin


In the Dublin Southern Court yesterday two women, named Agnes Byrne and Mabel Mitchell, were charged with having during the past two months stolen a quantity of silver and plated spoons, valued at £21, the property of the Lord-lieutenant and Messrs. West and Son, silversmiths, College-green, Dublin. It appeared that Messrs. West had charge of the silver at Dublin Castle, and that Byrne had been employed there temporarily as a kitchen servant. Assistants from pawnshops proved that Bitchell had pledged spoons. — The Magistrate censured the pawnbrokers for receiving without due inquiry such goods from women whose appearance showed that they were not likely to possess them. Some of the spoons were shown to bear the Lord-lieutenant's crest. The prisoners were remanded for a week.

Source: Evening Express and Evening Mail - 19th March 1903

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Re: The Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Jan 18, 2020 7:10 am

FRANK K. WILSON

Phoenix, Arizona


Frank K. Wilson, well known Navajo Silversmith, recently died in the Phoenix Indian Hospital, at the age of 37.

Requiem High Mass was sung at St. Francis Xavier Church with interment at St. Francis Cemetery.

A resident of Phoenix for eleven years, Wilson was born in Gallup, New Mexico, and attended Phoenix Indian School. A veteran of World War II, he was awarded three Bronze Stars.

Wilson is survived by three sons, Daniel, Andrew and Michael, and a daughter, Gloria, all of Phoenix.


Source: The Navajo Times - 4th July 1962

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Re: The Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Jan 19, 2020 6:53 am

JOHN FORD ARNOLD

New York


John Ford Arnold, for many years connected with the Britannia Company, silversmiths, died on Sunday at the home of his sister. Mrs. R. R. Lytle, No. 125 West 136th street. Mr. Arnold was born at Perth Amboy fifty years ago. a son of the late Judge John and Rebecca (Campbell) Arnold. The funeral will take place at his sister's home to-morrow morning at 10 o'clock. The burial will be in the family plot in the cemetery of his native town.

Source: New York Tribune - 14th January 1908

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Re: The Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Jan 20, 2020 4:54 am

STANDARDISATION OF PLATINUM

London


London, March 24.—The movement this side, with which all the leading firms in the trade are associated, to promote legislation whereby platinum may be standardized at 950 fine, culminated this month in a conference of trade factors with the Goldsmiths Company and the promise of the company to give the greatest consideration to the expressed views of the trade in the important matter of standardizing this precious metal. A deputation representing the best known firms in the jewelry industry of the kingdom waited on the Prime Warden and Wardens of the Goldsmiths' Company and were introduced by Chairman E. A. Dodd of the Diamond, Pearl and Precious Stone Trade Section of the Chamber of Commerce. The leading firms of London and Birmingham engaged in the jewelry trade were, it was pointed out, much concerned at the growth of a trade that dealt with platinum alloy goods under the guise of pure platinum articles. Only the standardizing of the precious metal, it was thought, would prevent the unscrupulous merchant from making false representation in connection with the sale of platinum alloy as pure platinum. Mr. Dodd said the jewelry trade favored standardization in the interest of the public as well as of the trade itself and urged that the Goldsmiths' Company promote legislation to that end and assay and mark any platinum article which might be sent to it for that purpose if it reached that standard. The marketing of alleged platinum goods (but which in fact were of platinum alloy or platinated gold) was, said Dodd, seriously affecting the jewelry trade. If, he said, platinum were standardized at not less than 950 per cent purity the dishonest trader could be dealt with if he invoiced as platinum a metal containing a lower percentage of pure platinum. That there are no real difficulties in the way of rapid assaying and marking of platinum is shown, said Dodd, in the way the French trade has handled the problem. The Prime Warden intimated to the deputation of jewelers that his company was in sympathy with the motives of the trade to end the present position as regards the marketing of platinum and promised that the Goldsmiths' Company would very carefully consider the proposals placed before it by the trade.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 9th April 1924

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Re: The Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Jan 21, 2020 6:04 am

PAUL REVERE SILVER Co. - BANKRUPTCY

Boston, Massachusetts


A dividend of twenty-five per cent has been declared by Referee Olmstead to creditors of the Paul Revere Silver Co., Boston, which went into bankruptcy two months ago.

Source: Crockery & Glass Journal - 30th April 1914

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Re: The Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Jan 22, 2020 5:35 am

PAUL REVERE SILVER Co. - REFORMED

Boston, Massachusetts


Another incorporation of interest to the trade is that of the Paul Revere Silver Co. of Boston, with $50,000 capital stock. The incorporators are: Sidney C. Seavey, Lillian C. Seavey and Charles A. Seavey, Jr.

Source: Crockery & Glass Journal - 11th June 1914

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Re: The Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Jan 23, 2020 5:22 am

THE KING HAS NO CROWN

Serbia


The coronation of King Peter of Servia, which had been fixed for June 15, which is the anniversary of his proclamation as sovereign, has been suddenly cancelled.

For a curious reason there will be no crown for the ceremony ready by that time. His Majesty, who is poor, asked his Ministers to arrange for the public exchequer to bear the cost, but the Skupshtina refused to vote funds.

The King then sent agents throughout Europe, with instructions to raise a personal loan for him, so that he could buy a crown from a leading firm of Paris jewellers, but when the emissaries returned to Belgrade they reported that their mission had been unsuccessful.

A religious service will now be held on June 16, and the King will be merely anointed in the old Servian monastery of Tsicsa. It is stated, however, that his Majesty is having a crown of brass fashioned from a cannon, which is kept as a relic from the time of his grandfather, Kara George, and that the coronation will take place later, with great ceremony, at his capital.


Source: Evening Express and Evening Mail - 16th May 1904

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Re: The Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Jan 24, 2020 2:56 pm

THE DETECTIVE'S WATCHING, BUT WHO'S WATCHING THE DETECTIVE?

Detroit


Detroit, Mich., May 5.—A remarkable case of systematic robbery came to light here last week in which Eugene Deimel wholesale jeweler, lost and recovered almost $500 worth of goods.

William Seymour is a private detective and had the confidence of the police. A stolen wheel was traced to him and his room was searched. Over $2,000 worth of goods, belonging to various merchants, were found, that he had stolen while in their employ. Five patrol wagons were required to haul the stuff away. For some time Mr. Deimel had been missing articles and had been watching his employes. On hearing of the find, he went to the police station and identified over $200 worth of goods. Mr. Deimel has made a complaint against him The thief so took the things as to throw suspicion on the employes, who are rejoicing at his capture.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 9th May 1894

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Re: The Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Jan 25, 2020 5:36 am

SCOTTISH LAW

Scotland


Scotch Law and Justice.—It is sometimes said English law needs reforming, but Scotch law needs understanding. The other day James Blewes was charged with the theft, breach of trust, or embezzlement, or one or other of these, of a gentleman's watch left with him to repair. Defendant stated that he did not intend to do away with it. He had found himself in Glasgow short of cash, and only borrowed £2 10s. upon it and would have redeemed it, as it was worth much more than £2 10s. He would not have raised a small loan upon it if he intended to make away with it. He, however, was sentenced to thirty days' imprisonment. At another Scotch Court Alexander Fraser was charged with what would anywhere else be called highway robbery from the person of James Macmillan of a watch and chain; and although this was the forty-ninth time he had been before the Court he escaped with a fine of 21s.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st December 1892

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Re: The Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Jan 26, 2020 6:44 am

HISTORIC LOVING CUP

London


The famous literary society of London called the Savage club has traditional connection with Will's coffeehouse and the Mermaid tavern of early days. The reader of Mr. Watson's volume of history and anecdote relating to the club will come across In its pages incidental mention of things that recall names that are famous in our literature. How rich in associations a simple drinking cup may become is shown by the following:

In 1902 there was brought to the club a most remarkable relic of which the lord mayor of London had recently obtained possession. This was a Ioving cup holding a pint or a little more which, as certain Inscriptions testified, was at one time the property of Oliver Goldsmith. On Goldsmith's death it passed Into the hands of David Garrick and thence to the possession of one of the literary and artistic clubs of the day.

Then after an interval it passed into Dr. Johnson's hands, for one of the Inscriptions engraved on its silver, rim records that it was presented to Burke by his friend Samuel Johnson, doctor of letters, as a memento of Johnson's visit to Beaconsfield, which was Burke's home. The date of the presentation was 1779. five years after the death of Goldsmith and five before the death of Johnson.


Source: The Daytona Daily News - 19th January 1911

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Re: The Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Jan 27, 2020 4:51 am

RUSSIA PAWNS JEWELS WITH POLAND

Warsaw


A Warsaw correspondent states that jewelry to the extent of $10,000,000 was pledged with the Polish government in 1922 by the Soviet government and is redeemable this month. There is little likelihood that this will be done, it is said, and the treasure, which contains many fine pearls and diamonds of the Russian crown jewels, will become forfeit. The Polish ministry, it seems, wants to give Moscow a chance to redeem its jewelry pledge and is giving it the first opportunity to buy back the gems at a slightly higher price than the best private bid. Dutch firms are said to be negotiating for the jewelry and if Moscow is unable to avail itself of the opportunity given it, it is probable that the Amsterdam diamond merchants will buy in the gems.

Source: The Daily Chronicle - April 1924

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Re: The Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Jan 28, 2020 6:11 am

PRIZE CUPS MUST BE AS STATED

Wolverhampton


Important to Givers of Prize Cups.—By a decision of Mr. Martineau, in the Wolverhampton County Court, it is made imperative that the Committees of Agricultural Societies must not give plated cups as "silver cups." A silver cup must be made of that metal, and not of baser material, either electrotyped or plated. His Honour, in giving his opinion, awarded to a successful exhibitor at a dog-show the full value of a silver cup, for which he had sued, in place of a plated cup, which had been forwarded to him by the secretary of the show. This decision will also affect prizes awarded at races.

Source: British Mail - May 1875

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Re: The Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Jan 29, 2020 2:13 pm

A 'WATCH-SNEAK' AND SONNETEER

Paris


A Paris jeweller (M. Saint-Joannes) has just had a peculiar adventure with an organised gang of watch purloiners. M. Saint-Joannes was alone in his shop when a well-dressed person walked in and asked to see some of the stock. The stranger selected a gold watch and chain worth about £18, and told the jeweller that be was a merchant and would send one of his clerks round for the articles. The sham clerk, who gave his name as Greffin, came in about an hour afterwards, and put an apparently well-filled purse, from which bank notes were protruding, on the counter. The jeweller glanced at the purse, and was internally satisfied. Greffin then asked for the watch, and compared its number with that which was on a card previously given to sham master by the jeweller. M. Saint-Joannes duly held the chain while the watch was being inspected, when suddenly Greffin pulled the articles away from him and bolted. Out into the street rushed the jeweller, crying "Stop thief!" with all his might, but he was coolly arrested as the delinquent by two impromptu detectives, who were probably accomplices of the real rogue. These officious and self-elected guardians of the law marched the unfortunate jeweller to a police station, and left him there. Shortly afterwards, however, M. Saint-Joannes had the satisfaction of seeing two bona-fide policemen bring in the veritable purloiner, in whose pocket the watch and chain were found, together with some sonnets of a Schopenhauer character, about the troubles of life, which had been fabricated by the enterprising Greffin. The "watch-sneak" and sonneteer refused to give any particulars respecting his accomplice or accomplices, and has been condemned to three years' imprisonment.

Source: South Wales Echo - 4th January 1889

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Re: The Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Jan 31, 2020 6:26 am

MEXICAN SILVERSMITH MAKES EXPOSITION MODEL

Monterrey, Mexico


A dispatch states that a silversmith in Monterey, Mex., is engaged on a work In silver which when completed will be an exact reproduction of the
agricultural building now being built on the exposition grounds, Chicago. It will be eight foot wide, will contain a quantity of silver valued at bullion at $10,000, and when finished will be valued at $20,000.


Source: Hopkinsville Kentuckian - 6th May 1892

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Re: The Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Feb 01, 2020 6:27 am

NEARLY THIRTY YEARS LATER, BUT POLICE GET THEIR MAN

Manchester


On a warrant issued at Manchester in 1895 charging the theft of nearly $500 worth of jewelry a man has been arrested in Scotland and brought to England to face the charge. The warrant officer who originated the case is now in his 81st year. The culprit says he has forgotten all about the affair, which happened 29 years ago.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 30th April 1924

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Re: The Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Feb 04, 2020 5:55 am

ROBERT WILSON

Philadelphia


Things in Philadelphia - Corespondent of the Tribune

Philadelphia, Jan. 25 PM - One of our most estimable citizens, Robert Wilson, an extensive silversmith, died in a very sudden manner on Saturday of an apoplectic fit.


Source: The New York Daily Tribune - 26th January 1846

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Re: The Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Feb 05, 2020 6:26 am

DEATH OF AUGUST JACOBI

Baltimore


The Death Record

Jacobi.—Mr. August Jacobi, senior member of the Baltimore firm of Jacobi & Jenkins, silversmiths, died Saturday afternoon at his home in the city. His death was caused by a bronchial affection, together with a general breaking-down of his health. Mr. Jacobi was born in Brunswick, Germany, 78 years ago. He came to New York in 1866, and four years later arrived in Baltimore. The present silversmith business he established in 1879 under the style of A. Jacobi. Mr. Jacobi is survived by two children—Mr. William F. Jacobi and Mrs. John T. Elliott, of Baltimore county.


Source: The Baltimore County Union - 10th May 1902

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Re: The Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Feb 06, 2020 2:11 pm

DON'T BUY JEWELLERY ABROAD

Birmingham


People planning holidays on the Continent this year are again being warned against bringing home "a lot of worthless jewellery." The advice comes from the Birmingham Assay Office.

Mr. Hamil Westwood, Assay Master, said in particular tourists should refrain from buying foreign gold and silver. "People are paying extortionate prices - foreign jewellery being far more expensive - and they have no idea what they are buying." he said.

No Continental country, apart from Holland, had a hallmarking system similar to Britain's, which existed to protect the consumer.

"France has a hallmarking system of a kind, but it is there to collect money for the Government as a form of taxation and not to protect the public.

"Germany has no cover at all. In Switzerland only watch cases are compelled to be marked and the Italian system is meaningless." Mr. Westwood said.

Silver bought abroad was mostly of inferior quality. Instead of being 92.5 per cent. it was mainly 80 per cent.

The safest plan is to buy jewellery at home where the the hallmark is an absolute safeguard.


Source: The Financial Times - 27th June 1969

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