The Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Mar 15, 2014 6:06 am

ANDREI ANANOV

St. Petersburg

RUSSIAN JEWELER ATTEMPTS TO COPY FABERGE SPLENDOR

By Alan Cooperman - Associated Press

ST. PETERSBURG, Russia - The art of Faberge, jeweler to the czars, was wiped out by the Bolshviks in 1917. Andrei Ananov. jeweler to the stars, is trying to revive it.

Because Soviet citizens were forbidden to trade precious stones and metals, Ananov spent years working in secret, trying to figure out Faberge's lost methods.

Now his workshop in St. Petersburg turns out Faberge-style pieces - not replicas, but one-of-a-kind originals - including intricate gold and enamel Easter eggs that sell for $10,000 to $30,000 each.

"All the old craftsmen either died or went abroad after 1917," he told a recent visitor. "I'm training a new generation from scratch."

Ananov embodies Russia's desire to reclaim its pre-revolutionary cultural heritage after 75 years of propagandistic art for the masses.

Fed up with the shoddy workmanship and cheap materials, a small but growing number of artisans now unabashedly produce luxury goods for a tiny elite. They include furriers, dressmakers and portrait painters who work mainly or exclusively for "hard" Western currency.

Few of Ananov's countrymen can afford his work. His best customers are wealthy visitors from Hollywood, Paris, Rome and New York. Gregory Peck has one of his eggs. So does Luciano Pavarotti.

Ananov, 45, cuts a debonair figure in this former imperial city - playing billiards at the ritzy Hotel Evropa, escorting his third wife to expensive restaurants and driving a Mercedes with French license plates.

He points with pride to a French magazine's description of him as playboy. "Making jewelery is a good hobby, because you spend less money on your wifes and lovers," he said.

Ananov looks back to the czarist days for inspiration. But he looks forward, too.

"I am a very vain person," he said. "I am working for a place in history. I know the better I make things, the longer my name will live."

His model, of course, is Peter Carl Faberge, one of the most famous jewelers in history.

In 1870, at the age of 24, Faberge took over his family's jewelry business in St. Petersburg. He assembled hundreds of master craftsmen, opened branches in Moscow, Odessa, Lodon and Paris, and began making jeweled flowers, miniature animals, cigarette cases and other "objects of fantasy."

In 1883, Faberge produced his first Imperial Easter Egg as a present from Czar Alexander III to his wife, Empress Marie. Inside the white enamel egg was a golden yolk, which opened to reveal a tiny chicken with a miniature inperial crown and tiny ruby egg.


Source: Herald-Journal - 15th April 1992

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Mar 16, 2014 6:52 am

OLAF SKOOGFORS

Philadelphia

SILVERSMITH DIES SUDDENLY

PHILADELPHIA (AP)

Olaf Skoogfors, award-winning silversmith and jeweler, died of a heart attack at his home here Saturday, he was 45.

Skoogfors was born in Bredsjo, Sweden, and came to the United States in 1939 with his family. He trained at the Philadelphia Museum's School of Art ant the Rochester, N.Y. Institute of Technology.

Skoogfors was serving as professor and chairman of the craft department at the Philadelphia College of Art. He worked in a second-floor studio above his garage.

Best known for his gold-plated silver jewelery and wrought silver, he also made hollow ware and ecclesiastical metalwork.

His work was exhibited both nationally and internationally. Among his awards were first prize in the Contemporary Jewelery International in 1963 and the $1,000 Tiffany prize in 1967.

His jewelery and hollow ware are in the permanent collections of the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Museum of Contemporary Crafts in New York and is also included in museums in Rochester, N.Y.; St. Paul, Minn.; Atlanta, Ga. and Pforzheim, Germany.

Skoogfors is survived by his widow, the former Judy Gesensway, an illustrator and teacher at Moore College of Art; daughters Kerstin and Mia; a brother, Leif, photography teacher at Moore, and his stepmother, Esther Skoogfors.


Source: Gettysburg Times - 22nd December 1975

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Mar 17, 2014 6:26 am

DISCOVERY OF ANCIENT JEWELLERY

Rome

Discovery of Ancient Jewellery.–In digging the foundations of the new Palace of Justice in Rome has been found, at the depth of eight metres, a marble sarcophagus bearing the name of Crepereia Triphajna, with the lid still firmly fastened with rivets of iron imbedded in lead. Inside was the skeleton of a woman, upon which were found (1) a pair of gold earrings with pearl pendants ; (2) a gold necklace with hooks of pietra dura ; (3) a large and elegant gold brooch having a carved amethyst representing a stag fighting with a hippogriff ; (4) a thick 'gold ring with a setting of cornelian representing two hands clasped, with two other rings of the same kind, one bearing the name Filetus ; (5) a ring composed of two gold circles conjoined, but moveable ; (6) a long amber spiral pin ; (7) two combs of boxwood ; (8) a silver box ; and a few other objects. With the skeleton lay a very delicately carved bambino of hard wood, about 30 centimetres high , and once gilt, the arms and legs being in full relief.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st July 1889

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Mar 18, 2014 6:04 am

B.V. DUNBAR

Pittsburgh

'RISE AND SHINE' MOTTO OF SILVERSMITH HERE FOR 20 YEARS

Its pleasant to have things served on a silver platter - but keeping the silver shining, is another matter.

And this is the job of B.V. Dunbar, silversmith of the Pittsburgh Hotel Corporation.

Repeal has renewed another branch of the work - that of keeping the silver service of the bar in gleaming array. It's all very well to say "Here's mud in your eye," for a toast - but even a speck of dust is out of place on the highball trays. Stored in vaults for many years, these trays and the cocktail shakers and ice bowls are in good grace again, polished to an old-time lustre by the silversmith.

Thousands of costly pieces pass through the hands, flatware and hollowware - some for burnishing, some for resilvering and some for repair.

In addition to the Fort Pitt and William Penn hotels, for whom he is silversmith-in-chief. Mr. Dunbar keeps the silver service shining for many clubs and restaurants.

That these articles need the care of a skilled craftsman if they are to be presentable, is quite evident. Most of them are costly - some of the big toureens and poulette dishes used at banquets averaging more than a $1,000 apiece.

It requires a lot of silver to set a hotel table, too - and the tarnished prong of a fork would spoil the whole ensemble.

Usually about 10 pieces of flatware are required in the serving of a meal, including the cocktail fork, consomme spoon, a teaspoon or two and a demi-tasse spoon. And this for one person. Multiplied by a roomful, it keeps a lot of silver in circulation.

The silver is burnished about twice a week. The burnishing process - if done by hand - would keep a small army busy, not to mention tons of chamois.

Instead, it is done in barrel-like machines, electrically operated. In to the barrel is put anywhere from 480 to 1980 pounds of "shot." The "shot" is a mixture of steel balls and pins. Water and a specially prepared soap powder are added - and then the silver is fitted into the cask.

The barrel revolves and pressure of the "shot" cleans the ware inside and out. Nozzles of tea and coffee pots are made sanitary, with the steel pellets scouring every crevice and cleaning away the sediment.

Dried and rubbed, the articles are dazzling when they are ready for service again, Mr. Dunbar said. Banquet ware gets this extra bath each time it is used.

When the time comes that the lustre fades, there life in the old ware yet. The silver is taken is taken to the workrooms at 1023 Liberty Avenue for treatment.

All surface gloss is removed from the ware down to the base metal. Then it is made chemically clean, since the least smudge would turn up a bad penny on it after it was resilverd.

The work is done in a room as neat as a hausfrau's kitchen. Eight operations are required in the process. When the article has been properly prepared, it is put in a blue dip and then taken to the tanks where silver anodes deposit a new coat on it. At this stage, the fork or spoon or platter emerges looking as if it had been turned from metal to china, because of the creamy white surface colour. But this is quickly buffeted away on a machine and the piece emerges like new.

In the William Penn Hotel alone, this craftsman has over 14,500 pieces of hollowware and 46,000 pieces of flatware. In the Fort Pitt, there are 16,500 additional pieces. To have them all arise and shine as needed, keeps the silver shops humming.

Because he is a silversmith of 35 years' experience, Mr. Dunbar has designed and made many supplementary articles for the service.

Flat sheets of 18-per-cent nickel silver are cut and hammered and pounded into punch bowls and coffee urns and hot plates, as the need may be.

Some twenty years ago, Mr. Dunbar, then working in a a silver company at Meridan, Conn., conceived the idea of establishing a silver service station in a hotel. He came to the Fort Pitt and has been there since, his scope of duties enlarging yearly.

During his early years, Pittsburgh was banqueting in a big way, he recalls. Once at least, a dinner was served at $100 a plate - and the plates weren't gold, either.

Mr. Dunbar was born in Sheffield, England. His father and grandfather were silversmiths and as a boy he entered the factory where his father was general manager. He was one of five brothers in the family - each learning the trade. When he came to the United States, he worked in the Connecticut silver factory for seven years before he began his shining career in Pittsburgh.


Source: The Pittsburgh Press - 15th January 1934

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Mar 19, 2014 6:18 am

WILLIAM W. RICH

Wallace Silversmiths

W.W. RICH DIES - HEADED WALLACE SILVERSMITHS

William W. Rich, former president of Wallace Silversmiths, and a former resident of Wallingford, died Saturday at Ball Memorial Hospital, Muncie, Ind., after a brief illness.

At the time of his death Mr. Rich was president of the Ontario Corp. of Muncie. Prior to holding the presidentcy of Wallace Silversmith, he was manager of Oneida, Ltd., Oneida, N.Y. He was a member of the 24 Carat Club of New York City.

He is survived by a daughter, Mrs. J.L. Skinner and a son Van P. Smith, both of Muncie; and four grandchildren.

Funeral services will he held today at 1:30 p.m. at the Campbell Dean Funeral Home, Oneida, N.Y., and burial will be in that city.


Source: The Morning Record - 10th September 1963

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Mar 20, 2014 5:55 am

BARON ERIK FLEMING

Stockholm

SKILL WITH SILVER

ROCHESTER - Hand-wrought silver - a long-neglected art form in thus country - is in for an American comeback. Small groups of talented art teachers have been learning the skill from some of Europe's best silversmiths, and they are now passing it on to their students.

The biggest factor in this revival is an intensive, four-week workshop, held here each summer, which is offered free under the sponsorship of Handy and Harman, refiners of precious metals.

Twenty graceful silver bowls, pitchers, coffee pots and goblets made by last year's class of seven men and five women, under the direction of Baron Erik Fleming, court silversmith to the King of Sweden, are now on exhibition in New York. Surprisingly, the beautiful, highly finished pieces are actually first attempts by the teachers-turned-students at raising forms in silver.

The students are chosen for their artistic ability, rather than their accomplishment in metal. The summer's group, which will study under Reginald H. Hill, leading British designer-craftsman, has just been selected from over 100 applicants. Only twelve can attend the classes.

Museums have shown great interest in contemporary American silver and are encouraging its development. Before the industrial revolution this country had over 800 professional silversmiths; until recently this number had dwindled to less than a dozen.


Source: The Miami News - 30th June 1950

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Mar 21, 2014 6:07 am

GOLDFEDER SILVER Co.

Yalesville

UNION DEMANDING TOO MUCH - SILVER FIRM STRUGGLES, MAY BE SOLD

Citing Financial losses, the president of the Goldfeder Silver Co. said over the weekend that unless the company is able to negotiage "a workable and realistic contract" with union negotiators, the plant may be sold to outside interests.

Sol Goldfeder, president of the silver manufacturing firm which has been located at 125, Grove St., Yalesville, for the past 20 years, said that in view of the financial problems of the last three years "it would be impossible to continue operations with the new demands of Local 221, United Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers of America.

He said that copies of the company's financial reports for the last three years, prepared by a certified public accounting firm, have been forwarded to Harry Kaplan, business agent of the union, to illustrate the need for "reaching a three-year contract that would enable us to remain in business."

Reached at his home, Kaplan confirmed Goldfeder's reference to the financial reports and said he intended to distribute copies to the union members. "We've known the company has had economic and financial problems the last year because of some union members being laid off."

However, Kaplan said that the firm had recalled all of the employees laid off during the economic slump. "We also realise that the company produces luxury holoware items and that sales were affected by the recession."

The business agent further said, "We've managed to have pretty good relations with the company in the past and always have tried to negotiate an agreement both sides can live with." Kaplan said the next negotiating session with Goldfeder officials will he held Thursday, June 17.

Goldfeder, president of the firm which relocated to Wallingford two decades ago after having been in operation for 21 years in New York City, said he would not disclose the name of the firm interested in acquiring the manufacturing plant.

In an unprecedented action, the company president made available to the Record copies of the firm's financial reports for the last three years but requested that the amount of each year's losses not be published.

Morever, Goldfeder showed a copy of a mortgage agreement with an area bank which he indicated was necessitated because of the firm's financial losses. "Unless the union modifies the terms of the present three-year agreement which expires on June 30, we simply would not be able to continue operations."

He said that he had submitted a counter-proposal to the union's business agent, a move he described "as the only possible way we can stay in business." The company employs 40 persons, most from the Meriden and Wallingford area, including four foremen.

Goldfeder said that the semi-skilled and unskilled employees average $4.24 an hour excluding fringe benefits. "If we were to add the company cost of the fringe benefits to the overall costs, the hourly pay would be about $6.24."

The company president disclosed that the union has asked for a substantial wage increase, another "floating holiday", a pension plan, a dental program, a $5,000 life insurance policy for each employee, major medical insurance cover, an improved maternity coverage plan for wives of employees; payment of X-rays and eye glasses - all to be paid by the company.

Goldfeder said the firm currently pays the entire cost of the CMS and Blue Cross coverage to employees and their families in addition to paying for 11 holidays during the year.

"Right now we have been negotiating for the sale of this business to another silver manufacturing firm because it is something we may have to do unless we get a workable contract with the union. And I'm not revealing the possible sale simply because of the current negotiations. It's simple economics."

The losses cited by the company president relate to 1973, 1974 and 1975.

Goldfeder noted that the same union in upstate New York had agreed to a new contract on May 27 resulting in union members receiving nearly $3 an hour less for small jobs. "The union said the agreement was approved by the union membership in order to reduce the 25 to 30 per cent unemployment rate among members in Chautaugua County, N.Y.

"I think that the union represents our employees has to take into consideration that we cannot afford higher operational costs. We are not asking them to take a $3 an hour pay cut; we want something reasonable." he said.

The union business agent sounded an optimistic note by saying, "I'm hopeful the company will be in a position to become involved in reasonable bargaining when we meet later this month."


Source: The Morning Record - 7th June 1976

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Mar 22, 2014 3:58 am

HENRY BIRKS & SONS Ltd. - SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW Co.

Montreal - Boston

HENRY BIRKS BUYS U.S. JEWELRY FIRM

BOSTON - (AP) - Shreve, Crump and Low Co., Boston jewellers since 1800, will be merged into a U.S. subsidiary of Henry Birks and Sons Ltd. of Montreal, the president of the Boston company announced yesterday.

No financial details were disclosed in the announcement by Richard Shreve.

The deal is subject to the approval of Shreve stockholders.

It is the first U.S. acquisition for Birks, which was founded in 1879 and now runs a chain of retail jewelry stores across Canada.

Shreve said the two firms shared a "similar outlook and philosophy." both being "old, well established family firms."


Source: The Montreal Gazette - 25th September 1979

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Mar 23, 2014 4:45 am

STURDY JEWELRY Co.

Chartley, Mass.

JEWELRY FACTORY BURNS - THREE PERSONS INJURED

Chartley, Mass., Dec. 7 - Two men and a woman were painfully burned and cut in an exciting escape from a fire which destroyed the Sturdy Jewelry factory today at a loss of $15,000 during the lunch hour while J.O. Goslin and Arthur Cummings, members of the firms occupying the building were dining on the second floor they were surrounded by fire. Goslin dashed down the stairs through the flames, receiving bad burns and a gash on the head from falling glass and secured a ladder. He climbed to the roof of an adjoining cell of the main building dragged the ladder up with him and placing it against the factory was able to assist Cummings and a woman employe, Miss Brunner to the ground.

Although all received severe burns and cuts from flying debris they will recover. A volunteer fire brigade with a hand engine, was unable to save the structure, which was insured.


Source: The Lewiston Daily Sun - 8th December 1911

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Mar 24, 2014 5:58 am

BRITISH GOLD STANDARDS AND DUTY ABOLISHMENT

THE BIRMINGHAM JEWELLERY TRADE

A considerable impulse has been given to the trade in lockets and hall-marked Alberts since the duty upon these goods was abolished, and if the recommendation of the Hall-Marking Committee to abolish the silver duty altogether should be adopted, a great extension of trade in this branch may be looked for. It is to be hoped that the mischievous proposal for abolishing the lower gold standards, which have worked so advantageously, both for the trade and the public, will not be allowed to pass into law. The danger is averted for this session, but manufacturing jewellers will have to be on the alert against the introduction of a measure of this character next year.


Source: Birmingham Daily Post - August 1879

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Mar 25, 2014 4:57 am

R. BLACKINTON & Co.

North Attleboro


ROSWELL BLACKINTON DEAD

North Attleboro Jewelry Manufacturer Dies at His Home After a Long Period of Poor Health

North Attleboro, Mass., Nov. 10–Roswell Blackinton, one of North Attleboro's best known and most respected citizens, died Monday afternoon at his home on High St. Mr. Blackinton had been in poor health for several years, and for the last 10 days had been seriously ill. His condition, however, seemed to improve until yesterday, and his death, which occurred about 5 o'clock, was a great shock to his many friends.

Mr. Blackinton was born in North Attleboro, June 16, 1872, the son of Roswell and Caroline Price Blackinton. He was educated in the North Attleboro public schools, Mowry & Goffs, Providence, and at Goddard Seminary, Barre, Vt.

Upon completing his education he entered the employ of R. Blackinton & Co., a concern established by his father and others, and was closely identified with it until he retired from active business in the Summer of 1920.

On Dec. 1, 1903, Mr. Blackinton married Miss Florence Sturdy, of North Attleboro, and she and one son, John Roswell, survive him.

Town affairs occupied much of Mr. Blackinton's time for several years, and he was secretary of the sewerage committee and an important member of the committee which built the new high school building. He was a 32nd degree Mason, being a member of Bristol Lodge, F. & A. M., Rabboni Chapter, R. A. Masons, and Bristol Cornmandery.

Few men have enjoyed a wider circle of friends than Roswell Blackinton. In recent years he had traveled considerably, and everywhere he went his good nature and keen sense of humor attracted to his side many prominent men. His pleasant smile will be greatly missed by a multitude of friends as they come together each season at the places he so thoroughly enjoyed, but their sadness will be lightened by the memory of his courage, fortitude and desire to look always at the bright side of life.

The funeral services was held at his late residence on High St. on Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock. Rev. H. E. Latham, of the First Universalist Church, was the officiating clergyman.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 15th November 1922

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Mar 26, 2014 6:51 am

WEDDING RING MOTTOS

Amongst the mottos which we have known engraved inside wedding rings are the followng fifty : –

"United until death,"
"United for ever,"
"Pledge of love,"
"Yours for life,"
"I am thine,"
"A token of eternal love,"
"Undo it who can,"
"Love conquers all,"
"Happiness (is) gained by love,"
"I devote my life to thee,"
"Love by God's will I shall,"
"Two united in one,"
"Where there is love there is happiness,"
"This is the bond of love,"
"From love springs all our hope,"
"In this sign is my hope,"
"I will never forget,"
"Not the voice but the vow,"
"Now and for ever,"
"Yours till death us part,"
"Take me as I am,"
"Let this ring always cling to thee,"
"I shall never forget,"
"God decreed, and we agreed,"
"Part us who can,"
"By this we conquer all,"
"Here ends all flirting,"
"Good bye all else,"
"U & I R 1,"
"U & I for ever,"
"U & I together love,"
"This lock knows no key,"
"My joys all spring for thee,"
"The knot that binds,"
"By love we live,"
"Love and forgive,"
"Despise all else,"
"May this break with my vow,"
"Faithful ever,"
"Wholly thine,"
"What this joins none shall sever,"
"I am thine and thou art mine,"
"By thee I henceforth live,"
"Hail transmitter of my name ! "
"Henceforth we're one,"
"The devil take the rest,"
"We ride abreast,"
"Better have none than plural,"
"Kindness, nobler ever than revenge."


Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st July 1891

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Mar 27, 2014 4:53 am

R. WALLACE & SONS Mfg.Co.

Wallingford

R. Wallace & Sons Mfg. Co, Wallingford, Celebrates Eighty-Fifth Anniversary

Wallingford, Conn., May 28.–Due to the rush of work and the large amount of orders from all over the world to be filled as early as practicable, officials were unable and decided not to have a special program or gathering in observance of the 85th anniversary of the founding of the little factory which today has grown to the large plant of the R. Wallace & Sons Mfg. Co. in this town. Wednesday of this week, the day The Jewelers' Circular is issued, is on the same date 85 years ago when Robert Wallace, a silversmith, began business for himself, starting in a small frame workshop and there turned out the first German silver of nickel silver spoon in the United States. Mr. Wallace, who was the first president of his company, was born in 1815 and passed away in 1892. Shortly after his death, the office of president of the progressing company was filled by the son of the founder, Frank A. Wallace, who continues to guide the concern.

It was but a few years before the late Robert Wallace was able to abandon his frame factory to enter a brick structure.

Today the company ranks high and among the oldest of its kind in this country, a record to be proud of. The present officers of the R. Wallace & Sons Mfg. Co. are: President, Frank A. Wallace: treasurer, C. W. Leavenworth; assistant treasurer, C. D. Morris. The secretary of the company for many years was the late Henry L. Wallace, whose death was announced recently with profound sorrow.

The officials of the R. Wallace & Sons Mfg. Co. have always been strong believers in advertising and are now planning to do some institutional advertising through the medium of trade papers and pamphlets and the scheme, it is announced this week, will he most comprehensive.

A tablet marking the site of the first factory building built by Robert Wallace, bears this inscription: "This tablet commemorates the establishment of his business and the manufacture of the first German silver spoon in America A. D. 1835 by Robert Wallace, who caused this cornerstone to be laid in the foundation of the original Quinnipiac Mills–A. D. 1834."


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 2nd June 1920

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Mar 28, 2014 4:42 am

BARON LOTHAR ALEXANDER MORTIMER von GRAVE

Wallingford

NOTED PRUSSIAN DIES IN THIS STATE

Wallingford, April 22 - Lothar A.M. von Grave, a Prussian, who served during the Franco-Prussian war on the staff of Field Marshal von Moltke, the commander of the Prussian forces, died yesterday at his home here. He had been a designer for a firm of silversmiths for many years. He was a native of Birresborn, Prussia, and came from a family of distinction. His father also served as a staff officer to Marshal von Moltke.


Source: The Day - 22nd April 1911

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Mar 29, 2014 7:04 am

WILLIAM R. MACKAY

Meriden Britannia Co.

Death of Wm. R. Mackay

Meriden, Conn., Aug. "27.–William R. Mackay, who for many years has been identified with the silver plated ware trade, died suddenly at 4 A.M. yesterday at the residence of his sister-in-law, Mrs. E. Z. Dow, 494 Winthrop Ave., New Haven. Mr. Mackay's health had not been good for some time, but his condition was not believed to be serious.

The deceased was born near Troy, Pa., 63 years ago, and when a boy moved to New York, where he was educated. Later he went to Dorchester, Mass., and while still a young man obtained work in the factory of the Meriden Britannia Co., with which he continued until the breaking out of the Civil War. He then enlisted in the Connecticut Volunteers and served with them until they were mustered out. Then went back to work with the Meriden Britannia Co.
A short time later he started in the britannia business in Philadelphia, but wound this up and returned to Meriden. where he became stockholder of Parker. Casper & Co.

Mr. Mackay was one of the organizers of the Amercian Silver Plate Co., in which he held the position of assistant treasurer, and superintendent for over 30 years. When this company was absorbed by the International Silver Co., he became connected with the latter concern, remaining until ill health forced him to retire.

Mr. Mackay was a prominent Mason, a member of the G. A. R., and one of the charter members of the Meriden Home Club. He had served on the Common Council and had held the offices of Fire Commissioner and Police Commissioner He is survived by a widow and two sons.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 3rd September 1902

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Mar 30, 2014 5:50 am

TAUNTON SILVERSMITHS

Taunton, Massachusetts


ARSON SUSPECTED IN TAUNTON FIRE

Taunton, Mass. - Firefighters say they suspect arson in a fire that raged through an abandoned silver factory next to the Taunton River. Firefighters from about 15 southestern Massachusetts communities battled the blaze at the former Taunton Silversmiths factory Tuesday afternoon and remained at the site wetting down hot spots throughout the night, officials said. Two firefighters suffered from smoke inhalation, but no other injuries were immediately reported.


Source: The Day - 18th August 1993

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Mar 31, 2014 3:37 am

G. & S. OWEN & Co.

Providence, R.I.


A pleasant event transpired in Providence recently, in the presentation of gold-headed ebony canes to George and Smith Owen, of the firm of G. & S. Owen & Co. The presentation was made to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of the day when the Brothers associated themselves together in the jewelry business, and the fact that for fifty years they have conducted business harmoniously together. The canes were presented by their partners and bore the following inscriptions: "Presented to George and Smith Owen, from their partners, James P. Snow and Charles E. Westcott, as tokens of their high esteem and to commemmorate the fiftieth anniversary of their establishment in business. 1834-1884." George and Smith Owen were born in Glocester, R. I., the former in 1805 and the latter in 1809, and consequently they will be seventy-nine and seventy-five years of age respectively in September and November next. They subsequently removed to Providence, and George first learned his father's trade, subsequently entering the shop of Davis & Babbitt, jewelers, where he remained five or six years; while Smith learned the trade of jeweler and chaser of Mr. Joseph Veazie. Afterwards they became partners in the firm of Hunter, Owens & Co., but Mr. Hunter soon retired from the establishment and the business was continued under the firm name of G. & S. Owen. Later they admitted others to the firm, and the present members are Messrs. George Owen, Smith Owen, James P. Snow (admitted January 1st 1872), and Charles E. Westcott (admitted January 1st, 1875). It is seldom in this country that business men are associated together for a term of half a century–exceeding, by considerable, the average business life of men–and should still continue in sufficiently good health to attend to business daily. A notable feature in connection with the firm is the extraordinary length of time some of their employees have remained with them, their terms of service varying from ten to forty years.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - September 1884

Trev.

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Apr 01, 2014 3:56 am

GERALD PIAGET

Switzerland

La Cote-aux-Fees, Switzerland - Gerald Piaget, co-founder of the Piaget watchmaking company famed for its ultra-thin timepieces, died Saturday. He was 79.

Piaget, three brothers and their father joined in 1942 in starting a watchmaking facility at La Cote-aux-Fees. Building on a family tradition of making watch parts in the winter and farming in the summer, they produced the first watch bearing their name in 1948.

The company was acquired by the Vendome Luxury Group in the 1980's.


Source: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel - 18th April 1997

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Apr 02, 2014 4:03 am

SURRENDER OF GOLD

Germany

MAY CONFISCATE GOLD

German Government Finds Appeals for Voluntary Surrender of Gold by the Holders Has Proved Insufficient

A special cable to The New York Times from The Hague, July 27, stated that, according to reports from the Dutch frontier, all gold and diamonds in private possession will be confiscated by the authorities in Westphalia this week.

For months there have been increasing indications in the German papers of the immediate necessity for gold. Up to the present time the Government has considered urgent appeals in the press sufficient, but it is evident that fresh supplies of gold are now imperative in order to keep up the steadily diminishing reserve. The situation has become more serious owing to large gold exports to Holland.

To-day's Weser Zeitung has an article beseeching the people to deliver up all their gold and diamonds to the State, arguing that a large gold reserve insures better credit both at home and abroad. The paper points out that it has been estimated that gold to the value of 300,000,000 to 400,000,000 marks is being hoarded by persons hoping to profit by it later. "Gold is needed," says the paper, "for victorious ending of the war." It proceeds to point out the "glorious example" set by the Empress and other royal persons, arguing that it is a duty to sacrifice even family heirlooms for the Fatherland, and that by so doing the dead are honored.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 1st August 1917

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Apr 03, 2014 4:12 am

CHESTER AND GLASGOW ASSAY OFFICES

THE SILVER CITIES

The Chester assay office closes to-day after more than 260 years of assaying and hall-marking precious metals. Its death warrant was signed three years ago by the Stone Committee appointed by the Board of Trade "to examine the state of the law on the assaying and hall-marking of precious metals ... ...and to recommend what revision of the law is desirable in the light of present-day conditions."

The same committee also recommended, Mr G. Moir Edward, former chairman of the wardens of the Glasgow Goldsmiths' Company, pointed out to me yesterday, that due to a falling off of business for local offices, the Glasgow and Edinburgh assay offices should be amalgamated so that administrative expenses could be shared.

But since the findings of the Stone Committee were published, he added, the business done by the Glasgow office has improved. The wardens of the Goldsmiths' Company, under whose aegis the office exists, are not interested in closing down the assay office, which offers the few local manufacturers facilities for having their goods assayed and hall-marked.

For the moment then, Glasgow and Edinburgh will continue their separate ways, with separate marks - the thistle for Edinburgh and the thistle and lion rampant for Glasgow. The Chester mark - three wheatsheafs and a sword on a shield - will join those of Exeter, Norwich, York and the rest in the carefully docketed extinction of their histories.


Source: The Glasgow Herald - 24th August 1962

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