The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Jun 05, 2019 4:43 am

QUEEN VICTORIA'S COSTLY MISTAKE

London


Some years ago her Majesty bought from a well-known London jeweler three very valuable pearls, the united cost of which was not far short of five hundred pounds. A little while after the purchase had been made, the merchant was surprised to received to receive a letter from a lady at court, which read: "The Queen wishes very much to know whether pearls will burn." The reply to this somewhat tartly scientific inquiry was an assurance that if her Majesty wishes to oxygenize pearls for her amusement she would find that they would burn in an ordinary fire. The Queen had placed the pearls on her writing desk, wrapped in a piece of tissue paper. As she was writing one morning, she used the tissue paper to wipe her pen, and then threw it into the fire. The pearls, all unobserved, went with it. The ashes of the grate were searched for them in vain. They had been destroyed so utterly as to leave no trace. The Queen with her own hand had cast three splendid jewels, worth more than the average income of her middle-class subjects, into the blaze.

Source: Ladies' Home Journal - November 1890

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Jun 06, 2019 4:15 am

THE NEW JERSEY JEWELRY Mfg. Co.

West Hoboken, New Jersey


The New Jersey Jewelry Mfg. Co. has been incorporated with a capital of $5,000. The offices are at 477 Spring St., West Hoboken. The incorporators are: Hevares Hakimiar, Riscalla, Tabib, Dickran Dabagian, Stephen H. Simsarian, Abraham Mardenly, Hannosh Basmajy and Haig Simsarian, all of West Hoboken.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 30th March 1910

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Jun 07, 2019 4:33 am

THE INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION

London


Hunt and Roskell, the eminent jewellers have sent a very large collection of shields, vases, testimonials, racing prizes, and rare specimens of goldsmiths' work. They will also exhibit the Nassuck and Arcot jewels belonging to the Marquis of Westminster. The Nassuck diamond was cut by Hunt and Roskell some years ago, and in order to illustrate the mode of diamond cutting and polishing, little known in this country, the whole process will be shown from day to day, in the annexe for machinery in motion.

Source: The Pontypool Free Press - 3rd May 1862

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Jun 10, 2019 2:23 am

SILVER SHORTAGE

Ireland


As the result of a boom in buying and selling scrap silver which practically wiped out the supply some time ago, Eire has a shortage of silver for industrial purposes, and silversmiths may soon have to quit.

Source: The Sunday Star - 11th July 1943

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Jun 11, 2019 3:05 am

WATCHMAKERS' LIABILITY FOR STOLEN REPAIRS

London


On March 1st Mr. Cluer, the magistrate at Worship Street Police Court, gave an important decision on the liability of a trader for articles left for repair. The case arose on the hearing of a summons against a tradesman named Abraham Schutz, carrying on business in Osborne Street, Whitechapel, as a dealer in watchmakers' fittings. The complainant was a working jeweller and watchmaker, who had had left with him by a customer a watch for repair, and it wanted a new dial. He took it to Schutz and left it for the dial to be fitted. The same night thieves broke into Schutz's shop and stole, according to his defence, the watch in question among other goods. Schutz, in giving evidence as to this, proved by records of the Court that he prosecuted one man here for the theft and recovered six watches, the value of which was only £2, but the watch in question, the second-hand value of which was put at £3 3s., was not recovered, and while searchingly questioned by the magistrate as to the facts, maintained his story that the watch was stolen. He admitted that he left it on his working desk near the window when ceasing work for the night, and this fact the complainant pressed on the magistrate as " negligence," saying that it was the duty of the defendant to have locked up valuables deposited with him in a safe. The magistrate said that the defence seemed to be established, and a shopkeeper was not liable for the value of goods stolen from him. He decided that there was no evidence before him of negligence on the part of the shopkeeper, and he dismissed the summons. The complainant, protesting, wanted to know what was his position with regard to his customer, the owner of the watch. No statement was made.

Source: The Journal of Domestic Appliances - 1st April 1905

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Jun 12, 2019 2:17 am

ATTEMPT TO CHEAT DEATH

London


At the Mansion House, London, on Monday, Vicente Ximenes, a Peruvian, was committed for trial on a charge of breaking a square of plate glass in the shop window of Mr. Death, the jeweller, in Cheapside, and a tray of diamond rings worth £250. The rings 42 in number, were recovered, except two, worth £55 together, which the prisoner was supposed to have swallowed.

Source: The Monmouthshire Merlin and South Wales Advertiser - 18th February 1865

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Jun 13, 2019 4:42 am

JEWELER'S UMBRELLA CAUSES PANIC ON TRAIN

Cincinnati


Ike Levites, a Covington jeweler, had an exciting time going home from Cincinnati in a Madison Ave. car Friday night. He held in his hand an umbrella, and some one threw a cigar stump into it. Before any one knew it, the umbrella was aflame. It created an panic in the car. Every one thought the car was on fire, and a dozen people jumped and were hurt. The blazing umbrella was hurled out, and in a moment was consumed.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 26th January 1898

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Jun 14, 2019 2:47 am

CHARITY EXHIBITION OF SILVERWARE

London


The charity exhibition of silversmith's work of European origin at Buckingham Gate has been doubled in Interest by various enlargements, and has been reopened for the benefit of Great Ormond Street Hospital for Sick Children. It is a wonderful display of English and Continental silver, contributed from the plate chests of the oldest country and town houses rather than from the colleges and corporations. The collection has been made mainly through the energy of Mrs. Adair, Cora Countess Strafford, Mrs. L. V. Harcourt and Mrs. Burns. J. Pierpont Morgan's Gutmann collection of Rennalssance silver from Augsburg and Nuremberg is exhibited for the first time in England. The collections in the Jewel rooms are modern, but gorgeous.

Source: New York Daily Tribune - 24th July 1902

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Jun 15, 2019 5:51 am

MARIE REGNIER KAUFMANN

St. Louis


After only five years of Intense application and study, Mrs. Marie Regnier Kaufmann, of St. Louis, U.S.A. has won wide acclaim as a master craftsman of the difficult but long-neglected art of silversmithing.

Mrs. Kaufmann, Hungarian born wife of an electrical engineer, is one of the few women to master the art in the long history of the craft.

Although schools of art and design have begun to teach students to shape small art objects from crude metal, few women undertake to hammer out large bowls and platters requiring muscular strength as well as artistry.

Mrs. Kaufmann studied for a tlme at the Rhode Island School of Design in Providence. She received most of her training, however, under European craftsmen, who taught her to forge her own tools and to use them with a skill and knowledge rare slnce the advent of the machine age.

Her first exhibition was made up entirely of pieces made for clients in the five years she has been engaged in the craft. Mrs. Kaufmann said the pieces were merely borrowed for the exhibition.

Some of the multitude of tools with which Mrs. Kaufmann works were forged by herself and others she acquired in Europe. "During mv last visit to Europe" she said, "I scoured the haunts of metal workers for tools made with the integrity of hand workmen." Among the smallest of her tools Is a set of 12 dozen sawblades, so small that the lot can be inserted in a case one quarter of an inch square.


Source: The Mackay Daily Mercury - 6th September 1939

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Jun 16, 2019 4:50 am

MUSEUM PURCHASES PAUL DE LAMERIE CUP

Birmingham


Birmingham (A.A.P.): The museum here has just wrested a magnificent 17th century silver cup from a U.S. museum. The cup, made by famous silversmith Paul De Lamerie, was sold at Sotheby's London art auctioneers. It was first bought by the Crown jewellers for a museum in the U.S. But later it was brought before a Treasury committee which prevents works of art of national importance from leaving Britain. The committee thought the merits of the cup by De Lamerie, a Huguenot who came to England toward the end of the 17th century, so great that they decided not to grant an export licence. They allowed Birmingham to buy it for £902.

Source: The Newcastle Sun - 13th April 1954

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Jun 17, 2019 3:38 am

JEWELLER TURNS GHOST-HUNTER

Broadstairs


A circumstantial story of mysterious midnight sounds and happenings in a house near the centre of Broadstairs has aroused intense curiosity among residents there. Testimony on the subject is borne by three people—by the tenant himself, who has fled from the house, by a local jeweller of repute, and by a local journalist.

The house is a roomy, double-fronted one in a quiet thoroughfare. The tenant told a press representative his story yesterday afternoon. "Almost immediately after my removal here, he said, the manifestations commenced, terrifying my wife into a nervous illness and shaking my nerve. Occurring at midnight upon about two nights out of six, they have followed a regular route. From the basement, where in one place the boards have a hollow ring as, though there were a well or some chasm underneath, we have heard a measured, heavy footstep mounting to the top of the house; then, after a brief interval, there has been quite a pandemonium of sounds. Doors have opened and shut. One in the hall, although previously bolted, has been flung wide open. There have been crashing sounds, amid noises of screams and deep, heavy breathing in the passages."

Three nights ago the jeweller and the journalist passed the night in the deserted house. Their story is as follows. "We heard noises—and we say it emphatically - which were quite inexplicable. We heard doors open distinctly, and we heard the sound of firm, rapid footsteps coming up from the basement. Then there was the noise as of same heavy article being rolled down the stairs. We were sceptics, but there were sounds all through the night—sounds as of someone moving about from room to room, which we could not explain. Although we also moved from room to room trying to trace the sounds not once did we note the sign of a human presence."


Source: Evening Express and Evening Mail - 24th October 1908

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Jun 18, 2019 2:19 am

THE MUNCIE JEWELRY & PLATING WORKS

Muncie, Indiana


A receiver has been appointed for the Muncie Jewelry & Plating Works, Muncie, Ind.

Source: The Brass World and Platers' Guide - August 1914

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Jun 19, 2019 2:44 am

THE DEATH OF DAVID UNTERMEYER

New York


David Untermeyer, one of the most prominent members of the New York jewelry trade, and head of the firms of Keller & Untermeyer Mfg. Co., Chas. Keller & Co. and The Woodside Sterling Co., New York, died recently at the German Hospital, where he had been confined three weeks. Mr. Untermeyer had been suffering for some time with diabetes, and six weeks ago while at Arverne, N.Y., he slightly injured his foot. As a result of the diabetes the foot grew worse, and it was for this reason that he went to the German Hospital, when his family returned from their summer home. His injury grew steadily worse, his blood being in such a bad condition, and finally resulted in his death.

Source: The Trader & Canadian Jeweler - November 1900

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Jun 21, 2019 12:11 pm

CHEAP GERMAN JEWELLERY

United Kingdom


English Makers and Workmen Suffer

The English jewellery trade of 1905. from a manufacturer's point of view, has been very unsatisfactory, showing no improvement upon the preceding year, which was the worst for a great number of years, writes a well-informed Birmingham correspondent.

Those most deeply affected have been the makers of middle-class goods, which branch forms by far the largest portion of the trade, and finds, or should find, employment for thousands of artisans. Most manufacturers are agreed that one reason, and perhaps the greatest, for the long-continued depression is the unrestricted importation of foreign-made jewellery, mainly from Germany.

Many thousands of pounds' worth of German-made jewellery, comprising in most instances articles that could be made as well, if not better, here, are brought into England at prices with which English makers cannot compete with the result that both manufacturers and workmen suffer.


Source: Evening Express and Evening Mail - 29th December 1905

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Jun 22, 2019 2:21 am

THE MARRIAGE OF EBENEZER HALL (ROBERTS & HALL - MARTIN, HALL & Co.)

London


Marriages

Hall - Wilkinson. At St. Paul's, Covent-garden, Mr. Ebenezer Hall, of Abbeydale, Park, Sheffield, to Sarah, daughter of the late Mr. George Wilkinson, of St. Paul's, Covent-garden, Feb. 17.


Source: Pall Mall Gazette - 25th February 1876

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Jun 23, 2019 7:22 am

UGLY, BUT POPULAR

United States


It is proverbial among jewelers that a repulsive and unique-appearing ornament often finds more favor among our sex than an article possessing real beauty. For instance, a pincushion inserted in the back of a silver crab of most ugly proportions, is appearing on many dressing tables, and will undoubtedly prove a success to its producer.

Source: Ladies' Home Journal - October 1891

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Jun 24, 2019 5:56 am

THE ROBBERY THAT WASN'T

Sharpsburg, Maryland


Pittsburg, Pa., Oct. 10.—John Glatz, a clerk employed by Philip Ruprecht, a jeweler at Sharpsburg, was seized yesterday with an epileptic fit in the absence of Mr. Ruprecht from the store, and the finding of the young man in an unconscious condition by Mrs. Ruprecht made her believe that a robbery had been committed and the police were notified. In falling Glatz struck his head against the corner of a show case, inflicting a wound, and it was thought that he had been struck by some instrument. The police of the town immediately arrested two suspects, who were later discharged.

Glatz was removed to a hospital, and after working with him for several hours he regained consciousness, and then it was that he was able to tell his story of the affair. In the meantime, however, Mr. Ruprecht was sent for and made a hurried inventory of his stock, but no goods were found to be missing.

The affair caused great excitement, because a few years ago Ruprecht’s store was robbed of about $3,000 worth of stock and the affair caused unusual excitement. In explaining the affair today to The Circular- Weekly correspondent, Mr. Ruprecht only laughed about the rear cause of the trouble—though sorry, of course, that his clerk had suffered illness. The Pittsburg papers published columns about the daring “robbery.”


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 14th October 1908

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Jun 25, 2019 2:34 am

JEWELLERS AND THE SHORT TIME MOVEMENT

London


At a meeting of artisans engaged in the goldsmiths' and jewellers' trades, held at the Foresters' Hall, Clerkenwell, yesterday evening, Mr. Galbraith presiding, it was resolved to agitate for a reduction in the hours of labour to an uniform standard, namely, 50 hours per week, and to support the workmen if an unreasonable refusal was made by the employers.

Source: South Wales Daily News - 12th September 1872

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Jun 26, 2019 2:51 am

CHURCHILL MEDALS AID VARIETY CLUB INTERNATIONAL

London


Immediately on return from his recent trip to America, international chief barker Jim Carreras handed a check for $5,000 to the charity fund of the Variety Club of Great Britain.

The money represented one third of the sum which Bob Pentland, a member of the Variety Club of Miami, paid for a set of the gold medals struck in England in commemoration of the late Sir Winston Churchill.

The international chief reported that Pentland had donated the balance of $15,000 to the Variety Club’s Children’s Hospital and Clinic in Miami.

The medals were originally donated to British Variety by Leslie Wheeler, managing director of John Taylor (Silversmiths) Ltd., in tribute to the work of Variety world-wide. The gift was negotiated by Clifford Jeapes, first assistant chief barker of the club.


Source: Motion Picture Exhibitor - 18th August 1965

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Jun 27, 2019 3:23 am

ARCHIBALD-KLEMENT Co., Inc.

Newark, New Jersey


Alexander Archibald, Mayor of Newark, died In the Eye and Ear Infirmary there Saturday morning. The Mayor had been suffering from Illness diagnosed as nervous breakdown since February 1. He fell unconscious yesterday afternoon at 4 o'clock. He was taken to the hospital and at 6 o'clock an operation of the most delicate nature was performed. Mrs. Archibald and Miss Katherine Archibald, the Mayor's wife and daughter were at the hospital during the operation. Frederick C. Beidenbach, Director of Revenue and Finance, acts as Mayor during Mr. Archibald's absence.

He was born In Edinburgh, Scotland, December 13, 1869 and when 3 years of age came to the United States with his parents. He was president of the Archibald Klement Company, manufacturing silversmiths of this city. He entered political life here In 1911 when he was made a member of the Common Council. Last May he was chosen Mayor.


Source: The New York Herald - 11th February 1922

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