Page 89 of 100

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Posted: Tue Mar 12, 2019 5:33 am
by dognose
A CURIOUS ACCIDENT

Blackburn, Lancashire


A large coping-stone, weighing a couple of hundredweight, fell from the roof of a high building in Penny-street, Blackburn, on Saturday night, and crushed through the ceilings of a house into the shop of a jeweller named Robinson. It scattered watches, rings, &c., wholesale. The shopkeeper escaped unhurt, however, but a portion of the stone hit a woman standing by, striking her on the head. Great excitement prevailed, and a posse of police were called to guard the valuables.

Source: Rhyl Record and Advertiser - 31st January 1903

Trev.

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Posted: Wed Mar 13, 2019 7:17 am
by dognose
RENZIEHAUSEN COMPANY

Newark, New Jersey


The name of the William F. Renziehausen Company of Newark. N. J., the well known refiners and gold and silver smelters, has been changed to the Renziehausen Company and the capital stock has been increased from $50,000 to $250,000. The business will be enlarged. The manufacture of sheet sterling and fine silver is carried on in addition to the smelting and refining of gold and silver. The company is located at 43 Oliver St.

Source: The Brass World and Platers' Guide - December 1913

Trev.

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Posted: Thu Mar 14, 2019 8:23 am
by dognose
CHARLES GOODIER

North Attleboro, Massachusetts


Charles Goodier, North Attleboro, a native of France but nearly a life resident of the town where he died, was buried Iast week, the community losing in him a valuable citizen. For many years he held an exceptionally high reputation as an engraver, and has been the holder of responsible positions with Frank M. Whiting & Co., G. K. Webster, and Riley, French & Heffron.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 7th June 1899

Trev.

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Posted: Fri Mar 15, 2019 7:43 am
by dognose
MOSES PEARSON

Portland, Oregon


Mr. Moses Pearson, one of the best known silversmiths in the city, died Monday evening at his residence on Lincoln street. Mr. Pearson came from
Haverhill to Portland over forty years ago and established himself in the silver business, making a speciality of silver spoons, knives and forks. Later on he adopted the silver plating branch and for years did a large business and controlled the principal part of that trade in the city. He first established himself in the old Printers’ Exchange building and later in a shop where Fluent block now stands, which was wiped out by the fire of 1866, and finally on Temple street, where the place of business is managed by his son. Mr. Pearson was 74 years old.


Source: Portland Daily Press - 31st August 1892

Trev.

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Posted: Sat Mar 16, 2019 6:47 am
by dognose
PIUS KEARN - AN ARMED WATCHMAKER

London


At Clerkenwell on Saturday Pius Kearn, a watchmaker, was charged with threatening to shoot James Dyde. The parties lodged in the same house, and, hearing a loud crash one night, Dyde ran upstairs and found Kearn glaring wildly and flourishing a revolver. He shouted, "I'll shoot anyone; I don't care who it is. Let 'em all come." A constable wrenched the weapon from prisoner. It was loaded in four chambers with ball cartridges.—The prisoner, in defence, said he was robbed of £ 20 or £30, and he thought burglars were in his room.—Mr. Horace Smith: You will have to find two sureties in £300 each for your good behaviour, or go to prison for four months.

Source: Evening Express - 12th December 1898

Trev.

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Posted: Sun Mar 17, 2019 6:40 am
by dognose
CHARLES FREDERICK HANCOCK

London


It is a well-known fact in the trade that most of the original members of the large West-end jewelers have either long since retired or have joined the majority. In some instances they have seen their successors also retire. Such was the case with the late Mr. Charles Frederick Hancock, of Hendon Hall and New Bond-street, who died a few months ago at the ripe old age of eighty-three, after being grievously afflicted for a considerable time. His will has been sworn under £62,137.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st July 1891

Trev.

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Posted: Mon Mar 18, 2019 7:29 am
by dognose
SHOURDS, STOREY & KASPER

Chicago


William Holmgrau, bookkeeper and cashier for Shourds, Storey & Kasper, Chicago jewelers, is missing. It is reported to day that his accounts are $10,000 short. Holmgrau had been with the firm eight years. He has not been seen for several days. It is believed that he is in Canada. The dual position occupied by Holmgrau enabled him to carry on his speculations with ease, and for a long period.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - November 1886

Trev.

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Posted: Tue Mar 19, 2019 4:29 am
by dognose
GOOD TIMES FOR CANADIAN JEWELLERS

Montreal


There is plenty of evidence that the jewelry industries have shared in the general prosperity. The increase in trade has been most marked, as the following import figures will show. There were entered at the port of Montreal for consumption during 1899 jewelry and watches and manufactures of gold and silver to the value of $357,116, against $326,443 for 1898, and $297,849 for 1897.

Source: The Trader & Canadian Jeweller - March 1900

Trev.

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Posted: Wed Mar 20, 2019 5:36 am
by dognose
NOT A BULL IN A CHINA SHOP, BUT A COW IN A JEWELLER'S SHOP

Chester


Shortly before two o'clock; yesterday (Tuesday) afternoon two cows which wore being driven through Foregate-street, Chester, became unmanageable, and one charged through the large plate glass window of a furniture shop, smashing it into fragments, and severely injuring itself. The other one entered the shop of Mr. Miles, jeweller, and caused considerable excitement by settling itself behind the counter. After some difficulty the precocious beast was got safely out, and fortunately no damage was done to the valuable articles with which the shop was literally crowded. The incident caused considerable excitement at the time.

Source: The Chester Courant - 29th November 1899

Trev.

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Posted: Thu Mar 21, 2019 4:44 am
by dognose
ELIZABETH NEWMAN

London


The city of London boasts of an expert lady jeweler in the person of Mrs. Elizabeth Newman, wife of the decorative artist, Philip H. Newman. She was educated in the South Kensington school of art, and for years made designs for laces, tapestry and jewelery. The noted English jeweler, John Brogden, won the cross of the Legion of Honor at the Paris exposition of 1878 for work done from Mrs. Newman's designs. The committee of award, learning the patterns were devised by a woman, ordered a special bronze medal to be struck for her, an honor granted to no other woman. Her designs also won for Mr. Brogden the gold medal of the French National academy, and at a Regent park flower show her designs for bronze and silver medals were accepted and coined. After the death of Mr. Brogden, Mrs. Newman set up an establishment of her own and employs six skilled workmen to produce her original and exquisite fancies in gold, gems and enamel. This lady also is enthusiastic over her work, not only on account of her own entire success, but because she believes it to be an avocation particularly adapted to the taste, patience and skill of women, and a new field in which they may make most gratifying advancement.

Source: Morning Journal and Courier - 26th September 1891

Trev.

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Posted: Mon Mar 25, 2019 5:25 am
by dognose
MATHEWS & PRIOR

New York


Mathews & Prior is the name of a new firm who recently started in the manufacture of a regular line of silver hollow ware and novelties, exclusively for the legitimate jewelry trade. Their offices are at 245 W. 28th St., New York, and the firm consist of Frank M. Mathews and Charles M. Prior. Both members of the firm, as well as their traveling salesman, Fred W. Cook, are well known to the jewelry trade, Mr. Mathews having been in it for 14 years, Mr. Prior for 18 years and Mr. Cook for five years. The firm make a specialty of designing special and presentation work and are pleased to furnish estimates to dealers interested in such work.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 2nd August 1899

Trev.

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Posted: Tue Mar 26, 2019 4:32 am
by dognose
ABDUCTION OF A SILVERSMITH'S DAUGHTER

London


As the steamer from Chalons arrived at Lyons, three days back, a young man and a pretty girl who accompanied him, were arrested as they stepped on shore by some police agents. This incident created some sensation, and it soon transpired that the young man had run away with the girl from London, and that the fugitives were arrested by order of her father. The young man was a native of Piedmont, named Tolomeo, who, after having worked for some time in Paris at his trade as a chaser in metals, went to London, and got employed by a silversmith in the city, named Grafton. Tolomeo showed such talent that he was soon made foreman, and, his ambition increasing with the improvement in his position, he ventured to propose for his master's only daughter. The father refused his consent, but the young man did not desist from his suit, and in the end, having seduced Miss Grafton, he pursuaded her to fly with him. This she did, taking with her a considerable sum of money belonging to her father. After staying a short time in Paris, Tolomeo learnt that the father had sent out emissaries in search of the daughter. His native country, Piedmont, appeared to the young man the safest place to proceed to, and he and Miss Grafton were on their way there when the Paris police, who had got a knowledge of their proceedings, sent word to the Lyons police, and had them arrested.

Source: The Globe - June 1854

Trev.

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Posted: Wed Mar 27, 2019 4:53 am
by dognose
CONNECTICUT SILVER PLATE COMPANY

Bridgeport, Connecticut


The Connecticut Silver Plate Company has been organized in Bridgeport, Conn, with a capital stock of $50,000 for the manufacture of art metal novelties. The new company takes over the plant and business of the Macfarlane Bros. Mfg. Co., Ash and State Sts., Bridgeport, Conn, which have manufactured the same line of work. Behrend & Rothschild of New York City, jobbers in novelties, are interested in the new company.

Source: The Brass World and Platers' Guide - March 1913

Trev.

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Posted: Thu Mar 28, 2019 7:26 am
by dognose
WATCHMAKER GETS THE 'CAT'

London


The murderous outrage at Finchley-road was dealt with by the Old Bailey judge yesterday. Robert Brown, alias Fitts, watchmaker, and William Marshall, dealer, were indicted for robbing William Lewis of the sum of £120, being armed at the time with an offensive weapon, and also for maliciously wounding him. Lewis was in the service of a sub-contractor engaged in building a tube railway. He was entrusted with money to pay the wages of workmen. At half-past six o'clock on the morning of March 11 he was in the Finchley road, having a bag containing £120 in gold in his possession. Brown passed him for a short distance, and then turned back and dealt him a terrible blow over the head with a piece of iron, rendering him insensible. Marshall then drove up in a pony cart, into which Brown jumped, after having robbed Lewis of the money. Brown was sentenced to five years' penal servitude and ordered to receive eighteen strokes with the cat, and Marshall, who had nothing to do with the violence, was sentenced to seven years' penal servitude.

Source: Evening Express and Evening Mail - 6th April 1905

Trev.

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Posted: Fri Mar 29, 2019 5:40 am
by dognose
SILVERSMITH GETS DRUNK AND LEAVES TOWN WITH CUSTOMERS' WATCHES

McConnelsville, Ohio


For some three or four weeks back, a German, named Herman Berg, a traveling silversmith, has been working journey-work for H. B. Vincent & Bro., and boarding at the Post House. On last Saturday, after closing up his engagement at Vincent's, he got on a drunken spree, and got hold of two watches belonging to John Fogle, bar keeper at the Post House, and another watch belonging to Dr. Simmons, one of the proprietors of said hotel, and promised to put them in good repair and return them. He continued on In his drinking till Monday, when he embarked for Beverly, forgetting to leave two of said watches behind him, and having traded the other one to A. Miller, silversmith in Malta. He was followed by an officer, found in Beverly, where he had sold one of the watches for one dollar and sixty cents to Charles Clymor. He was arrested, brought up here on Wednesday, tried before Esq. Gaylord, and sent to jail for three days. H. B. Vincent & Bro. say that Berg was honest and upright in his dealings with them.

Source: The Conservative - 7th January 1870

Trev.

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Posted: Sat Mar 30, 2019 9:15 am
by dognose
JEWELER ILLEGALLY INCARCERATED?

Bradford, Pennsylvania


Bradford, Pa., Feb. 6.—It is correctly reported that W. Schopperle, a former well-known jeweler of this city, is illegally confined in the State Hospital for the Insane, at Warren, and is there subjected to treatment which his condition does not warrant; also that a considerable estate which he had accumulated is being handled by others against his will.

It is stated that steps are being taken by friends of Mr. Schopperle In this city to investigate the matter of his confinement in the asylum and ascertain as to his condition mentally and to his property.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 8th February 1893

Trev.

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Posted: Sun Mar 31, 2019 5:42 am
by dognose
DOWD-RODGERS Co.

Wallingford, Connecticut


The Dowd-Rodgers Co., Carlton St., manufacturer of silver plated ware, is having plans prepared for the construction of a 1-story 40 x 120 ft. factory on Cherry St. Estimated cost $40,000. Private plans.

Source: American Machinist - 3rd May 1923

Trev.

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Posted: Mon Apr 01, 2019 3:56 am
by dognose
LIBEL ACTION OVER QUALITY OF PRESENTATION SWORD

London


At the Guildhall, London to-day, C.C. M'Donald, jeweller, of Birmingham and Glasgow. was awarded £725 damages against the Daily Mail Publishing Company for libel, by asserting that the hilt of the sword of honour manufactured by plaintiffs for presentation to General Hector Macdonald was not made of pure gold as represented. The plaintiff claimed £5,000 damages. The case was undefended, but Mr. Gill addressed the jury in mitigation of damages.

Source: Evening Express - 7th February 1901

Trev.

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Posted: Tue Apr 02, 2019 5:03 am
by dognose
IT WOULD NOT HAPPEN NOWADAYS

Montreal


To leave one's watch at a jewelers to be cleaned, to go away on a nine years' cruise of the world, return, ask for the timepiece and have it handed out within five minutes of making that request was the recent experience of one of the patrons of Henry Birks and Sons, Limited.

Nine years ago a sailor on one of the ships, which then visited this port, left his watch with that firm to be cleaned. He went away with his ship and forgot the timepiece. He returned and inquired if by any chance his watch had been kept. To his surprise it was almost immediately handed to him.

The manager of the watch department states that persons leave their watches, leave the city, perhaps meet with an accident or for some reason, forget all about their timepiece, but an accurate record is kept of all watches left for repairs, which goes back for years.


Source: The Trader & Canadian Jeweller - January 1920

Trev.

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Posted: Wed Apr 03, 2019 3:37 am
by dognose
PRINCE OF WALES SENDS CASH BACK TO BIG BUSINESS

London


The returning to a half dozen big manufacturing concerns their checks for $5,000 each, which had been sent to the Prince of Wales' War fund, has caused a big stir here. The concerns which had their donations rejected include the foremost British house of silversmiths and jewelers and one or two dry-goods stores of world-wide fame.

The affair has been handled with finished diplomacy and great secrecy, but the main facts have leaked out. It is said that Queen Mary is behind the move and the action taken marks her deep concern in social issues in a democratic sense.

The Prince of Wales' fund in the national offering to dependents that Tommy Atkins has left behind him It also aims to give assistance in cases where unemployment becomes acute through the war affecting industries. A national committee, on which all parties and denominations are represented and headed by Former Premier Alfred J. Balfour, administers the fund at headquarters and local committee all over the kingdom attend to the distribution. Of the $15,000,000 already subscribed about a quarter has been given away.

There are two or three wide-awake aristocrats on the administration committee with marked democratic tendencies and they told the queen that the firms that sent the $5,000 checks had discharged enough employes to make up more than the amount in wages. Moreover, it was pointed out that while they were putting up gaudy notices that all their men who joined the army would have their places kept for them and would suffer no loss of pay, there was a clear trick in the reckoning that meant a clear profit instead of a loss.

For example, a man in one store was earning $20 a week. He went in to the army as a volunteer captain and received $12.50. All that the store did was to persuade his associates to do his work as well as their own in the name of patriotism, while the pay-office contributed the difference of $7.50 to make the pay run the regular scale of $20. They thus saved $12.50 a week. As they each had a few hundred army contracts, their patriotism was profitable.

The scheme didn't appeal to Queen Mary. So she drafted a note of refusal to the firms that had sent the checks and had her son sign it. The note said that in view of the distress that was occurring and was likely to extend in the silversmiths and other department of their business, it was desirable that charity begin at home and the amounts indicated on the checks be devoted to their own employes.


Source: The Evening Journal - 27th October 1914

Trev.