The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Feb 20, 2019 5:05 am

SILVERSMITH WRECKS VENDER'S PUSHCART

Oakland, California


Street Brawl Lands Man in Jail on Three Charges

OAKLAND, Aug. 1 — A. Sorenson, a silversmith employed by Shreve & Co. and living in San Francisco, was arrested this evening, charged with petty larceny, using vulgar language, and malicious mischief, after he had wrecked an ice cream cornucopia ice wagon pushed along the streets by an unidentified Greek. He is said to have demanded a share of the peddler's edibles and when refused helped himself. This act was the basis of the petty larceny charge. The other two charges arose when Sorenson resisted arrest, knocked the pushcart into the street, and called F. Stachler foul names for informing the patrolman as to who was the culprit.


Source: The San Francisco Call - 2nd August 1909

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Feb 21, 2019 5:11 am

GOLD IN THE CLOGAU

Wales


It is nearly six years since I wrote to you upon "Gold in Wales," since which time I have never laid aside inquiry upon the subject. I said then that I should not write you again until I had something positive to communicate. Now, lest the information should reach you from some other source, in an incorrect form, I think it better to tell you myself that on Monday last, at my direction, four shots were fired on the St. David's lode, in the Clogau Mountain, near Dolgelly, and (say) 15 cwts. of quartz broken down, containing visible gold finely disseminated throughout the greater part of it. The value is, probably, from £500 to £600. One stone weighs, say, 4½ cwts., is about two feet thick, and has gold running quite through it. This remarkable stone, with others of less weight, but richer and more beautiful, will be in London in the course of next week, when you will have an opportunity of forming your opinion thereupon. At present I shall only add that the gold continues in the lode of the same value, and occurs not as heretofore in strings, shoots, and hunches, but is generally distributed throughout the lode-stuff, sometimes associated with yellow sulphide of copper, and occasionally with what I take to be telluric bismuth. I need hardly add, that the amalgamating mysteries of the past have no bearing upon the question as it at present stands with regard to the extraction of the precious metal. I promise you more in detail as the operations progress. I still incline to the opinion that gold may be extracted from the minerals of some parts of this country at a profit. Time will prove, as I have said before, whether this be a mistake or not.

Mr. T. A. Readwin
Stretford
Manchester


Source: The Mining Journal - June 1860

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Feb 22, 2019 4:30 am

LaPIERRE Mfg. Co. RELOCATES

Newark, New Jersey


The factory of LaPierre Mfg. Co., formerly at 20 University Place, was moved Saturday to Newark, N. J. The firm's headquarters will hereafter be in Newark, but they will continue to have a New York office which will be located in the Decker Building, 33 Union Square.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 31st March 1897

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Feb 23, 2019 4:41 am

JEWELRY COMPANY RESTYLES NAME

East St. Louis, Illinois


The Dixon-Nims Co., East St. Louis, Ill., has changed its name to Dixon Bros, and Brockman Jewelers, Inc.

Source: The Brass World and Platers' Guide - August 1914

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Feb 24, 2019 7:36 am

GURTON W. HALL

Wallingford, Connecticut


Death of a Connecticut Millionaire

Gurton W. Hall, President of Simpson, Hall, Miller & Co., silversmiths, died last night at the Gilsey House of apoplexy. He was 60 years old, lived at Wallingford, Conn. and was estimated to be worth $2,000,000.

His wife and daughter were with him when he died. He was prominent as a Democrat in Connecticut.


Source: The Sun - 11th May 1894

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Feb 25, 2019 3:47 am

SILVERSMITH TO HER MAJESTY

Hull


A beautiful time-piece, in glass case, has been, during the week, exhibited in the window of Mr. B. Jacobs, silversmith to Her Majesty, in this town. The time-piece has been presented to Mr. G. J. Skelton, by the superintendents and teachers of the various Sunday Schools in Hull, as a memorial of gratitude for his valuable and disinterested services as conductor of the united choir of 12,000 children, on the occasion of Her Majesty's visit to Hull.

Source: Hull Advertiser - 14th October 1854

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Feb 26, 2019 3:45 am

A SAD STORY OF A MAGNIFICENT GIFT

Washington, D.C.


The many beautiful jewels which one can see displayed in the windows of pawn offices have nearly always a pathetic history attached to them unknown to the world, but only too painfully remembered by those who once owned them. Here are rings, brooches, diamonds, each with their own sad story; even musical instruments whose chords at one time comforted the owner in his poverty and perhaps brought him revenue enough to keep the wolf from the door. Occasionally an exceptionally fine piece of silverware tells mutely of the fall of its once proud owner from affluence to want. A case of this kind is to be found in a pawn-shop in Washington, D.C. When Frederick William IV., King of Prussia, visited England in 1842 he was greatly impressed with the kind and courteous treatment that be received from the High Constable of Westminster. When the King returned home he ordered the royal silversmith to design and execute 200 superb pieces in solid silver as a gift and heirloom to the courteous official of Westminster. In after years, when the family were in reduced circumstances, the owner was offered $6,000 for the service, which consists of an immense coffee urn, tea urn, cream pitcher, sugar bowl, spoons of various sorts, knives, forks, tongs, etc, exquisite workmanship, but he declined. But the many changes that come to families in the course of time finally compelled the owner of this magnificent gift to part with it, and now it can be seen in a pawnshop on Pennsylvania avenue, where with its many companions on exhibition it meekly whispers its story of distress.

Source: Kentucky Irish American - 11th August 1900

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Feb 27, 2019 6:05 am

THE RAILINGS AROUND THE MONUMENT TO JOHN BRIDGE RESTORED

New York - London


Queen Mary of Scots' Tomb Railing

A most interesting historical relic can now be seen at Harding's No. 11 East 56 St., namely, the wrought iron railing made for and erected round the elaborate stone monument of Mary, Queen of Scots in the south aisle of the Chapel of Henry the Seventh in Westminster Abbey. (Illustrated in Ackermann's "History of the Abbey Church of St. Peter's, Westminster" published in 1811) and which was taken down about the restoration, (circa 1820), by the Abbey mason Gayfere, under the directions of the architect Wyatt and sold, together with the railing, from the adjacent monument of the queen's great-grandmother Margaret, Countess of Richmond, to the silversmith, John Bridge.

The two railings, together with a wrought iron bracket of the 17 century were bought by Mr. Harding from Mr. John Bridge's grandson, Mr John Bridge of Puddletrenthide, Devonshire, England. The one from the monument of the Countess of Richmond was restored and sold by Mr. Harding to the National Arts Collections Fund, and by them presented and replaced in the abbey.


Source: American Art News - 3rd March 1917

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Feb 28, 2019 5:23 am

THE DEATH OF JEAN ADRIEN PHILIPPE

Geneva, Switzerland


News was received in New York, Monday, of the death on Jan. 5 of Jean Adrien Philippe, Chevalier de la Legion d’Honneur, member of the famous watch manufacturing firm of Patek, Philippe & Co., Geneva, Switzerland, in the 79th year of his age.

The deceased was born in 1815 in Bazoche-Gouet, France. He was the principal medium through which the firm of Patek, Philippe & Co., founded in 1837 by a Polish refugee, Antonie Robert de Patek, became famous for their products throughout the world. The full importance of this establishment was not developed, until Jean Adrien Philippe was admitted as a partner. He introduced interchangeability of material and keyless watches with a winding mechanism devised by himself. The career of this self made man, who was a practical and scientific watchmaker in the fullest sense of the word, is of such an interesting character that we cannot refrain briefly relating it. However space in this issue is too limited ; we will therefore withhold our intention of giving a review of the life of the deceased until the next issue. Jean Adrien Philippe has a worthy successor in the person of his son, Emile.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 24th January 1894

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Mar 01, 2019 7:22 am

KING ALFONSO'S GIFT TO THE PRINCESS MERCEDES

Paris


King Alfonso has ordered at Paris a casket by way of a betrothal present to his future wife, the Princess Mercedes. It is in lapis-lazuli, mounted on four lions' claws, 16 inches high and 30 square, ornamented with garlands of golden roses, which are miracles of delicate workmanship. The hues of the flowers are all faithfully presented. The key is a golden rose full bloom. The interior of the casket is lapis-lazuli, studded with tiny nails, diamond-headed. The casket is intended to hold the lover's love letters, but it goes to the Princess in the first place with but one note and a necklace of eight rows of pearls.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 5th January 1878

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Mar 02, 2019 8:25 am

BEER STEINS TURNED INTO AN ORCHESTRA

Philadelphia


The most fantastic set of beer steins In existence is probably that which Philadelphians had a chance to see the other day.

The queer set was among the wedding presents showered upon Elsie Cassatt when she was married to William Plunkett Stewart of Baltimore In January last. The gift aroused the curiosity of every guest.

Each stein is of silver and fashioned to represent a musician blowing a horn, playing a violin or beating a drum. When the nine are placed in the center of a table they form a complete orchestra.

While decidedly interesting as examples of the workmanship of a century ago the steins can scarcely be regarded as model drinking vessels. The
head and shoulders of the musicians can be lifted off. This discloses a cavity In the body which holds about as much liquor as a wine glass. There are no handles unless the horns and stringed instruments are intended for purpose. They were made In London, makers name unknown and fashioned by hand with rare skill.

The patience of the silversmith who fashioned the cups must have been extraordinary, for the delicate strings of the violins and the intricate parts of the wind instruments are all carefully modeled and the heads of the musicians are studies in themselves. One man looks around the air of an expert who has trilled off his solo and knows he has done as no one else can; others are almost cracking their cheeks as they put vigor into the melody; the cello player smiles gleefully over his contribution and the bass drummer and performer on the cymbals appear to be In deadly earnest as they pound their respective instruments. The musicians wear the ruffles and trunks the Elizabethan period.


Source: The Salt Lake Herald - 10th August 1902

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Mar 03, 2019 5:53 am

THE SOURCE OF PHILIP RUNDELL'S FORTUNE?

London


Somehow, neither diamond dealing nor goldsmithing seem, in businesses, to be often attended with great wealth. In America, for instance, it would, we fancy, be hard to point to large fortunes accumulated in this line which can compare with those accumulated in many others, and in England they are very few and far between, and may generally be traced to some exceptional cause. Mr. Rundell, for example, of the celebrated firm of Rundell & Bridge, undoubtedly was largely indebted for the million and a half sterling he left behind him, some fifty years ago, to the French revolution of 1789. England was at that epoch flooded with gems, which were in most instances, all the property that emigres could carry away with them; and what with the glut in the market and the neediness of the would-be vendors, these stones were sold at what Pip's diarist calls a " tremenjous sacrifige".

Source: Daily British Colonist - 24th January 1879

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Mar 04, 2019 8:37 am

NO GEMS ARE FOUND WHEN GRAVE OPENED

New York


NEW YORK, Feb. 14.—None of the Russian crown jewels, which were declared to have been hidden by smugglers in the coffin of John Jones, an American seaman, buried in Cypress Hill Cemetery, were discovered in the grave when the casket was exhumed today. Examination of the grave was carried out under permission given by the War Department on assurances from apparently authoritative sources that the Russian gems would be found there.

Source: The Cordova Daily Times - 14th February 1923

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Mar 05, 2019 6:50 am

THE WATCH-PAPER'S WARNING NOT HEEDED

Waterford, Ireland


On Thursday evening last, a man named Thomas Vaughan, who resided in John-street, and who was employed as a skinbuyer, fell into the river at the Ferry slip, near the Coal-quay, and was drowned. It appeared he had spent the early part of the evening in company of a woman of loose character, and in some scuffle has received a slight contusion on the head. He was intoxicated, and it is supposed that he went to the river to wash his wound when this melancholy accident occurred. His watch was discovered at a public house, through the activity of Mr Christopher Ballard, Peace Officer; and curious to add, the watch-paper bore the following inscription:- 'The end of all things is at hand, be ye therefore sober and watch'.

Source: The Waterford Mail - 7th January 1824

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Mar 06, 2019 6:19 am

TERRIFIC EXPLOSION IN A JEWELRY STORE

Los Angeles


Los Angeles, Cal., April 20.—An explosion occurred at five minutes after midnight Monday night, which remains a mystery. There was a report like the firing of a 20-inch cannon, a blaze shot up in the sky and the buildings 455, 457 and 459 S. Spring St. were in an instant almost obliterated.

A hurried investigation showed that Nos. 455. 457 and 459 were completely destroyed, while Nos. 453 and 461 were badly injured, doors and windows being torn out by the terrific concussion. The explosion evidently occurred near the north side of the room of Ben Babarowski’s jewelry store, near the safe, in the center of the building. Here it was that the floor joists were torn and twisted into splinters, as though dynamite or giant powder had exploded. The large, heavy safe was turned on its side and covered with debris. As no one has been able to reach it, there is no telling whether it is blown open or not. The whole interior is simply a mass of ruins, with the heavy tin roof covering the whole.

Some think that the explosion might have been caused by a can of gasoline, others by an engine used in the jewelry store, but the most plausible theory is that either dynamite or nitro-glycerine was used.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 2nd May 1894


Follow-up:

The mystery of the explosion which ruined three buildings in Los Angeles, has been solved. Babarowski, the jeweler, in whose shop the explosion occurred, was intoxicated and left gas escaping when he closed the store. He also left a lighted oil lamp on the floor. When the room had filled with gas the disaster occurred.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 9th May 1894

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Mar 07, 2019 6:55 am

SPOONMAKER BEATEN AND ROBBED

Bridgeport, Connecticut


About 11 o'clock' Saturday night, while on his way home, Charles Howland, a spoonmaker employed at Holmes & Edwards silver factory was attacked, beaten and robbed at the corner of Noble avenue and Arctic St., by two unknown men.

O. S. Brown, a commercial man who, saw the affair from an opposite corner, hurried over but the footpads fled. They had commenced to search
Mr. Howland's clothes when frightened away.


Source: Bridgeport Evening Farmer - 10th December 1914

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Mar 08, 2019 4:30 am

AN ANARCHIST JEWELLER

London


RAID ON A LONDON JEWELLERS SHOP

The Press Association states that, in addition to the raid made on Thursday night on the International Toilet Club, in Bennet-street, London, W., detectives also made a raid on the premises of a jeweller named Rousseau, 16, Charlton-street, Marylebone. They took the numbers of all the watches, demanded the names and addresses of Rousseau's customers, minutely searched the place, and also one of Rousseau's customers, whose name and address were also demanded. The officers refused to state the object of their visit, or to produce their warrant, and, after seizing some Anarchist manifestoes, etc., left, warning Rousseau to remain at home, as they would return.


Source: Western Mail - 17th March 1894

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Mar 09, 2019 8:19 am

COSTLY MISTAKE AT T. EATON'S

Winnipeg


A saleslady in the jewelry department of the T. Eaton Co.’s big department store, at Winnipeg, last week, sold a large solitaire diamond ring priced at $150 to a young man for $1.50. The mistake was due to want of care in marking the price, and the clerk being only taken on for the holiday rush was unfamiliar with the goods. All attempts to trace the purchaser proved unavailing.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 22nd December 1909

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Mar 10, 2019 6:32 am

S.B. BROWER & SON ROBBED

Albany, New York


Albany, Nov. 30, 1874. - The silversmith factory of S. B. Brower & Son, on Plain street, was robbed early this morning of silverware worth between $5,000 and $10,000, and L. G. Burgess' jewelry factory, in the same building was robbed of goods to the value of $5,000. The store of James Maxwell, Sr., was robbed on Saturday night of hardware to the value of $500. A reward of $1,000 is offered for the detection of the thieves.

Source: New York Herald - 1st December 1874

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Mar 11, 2019 6:26 am

THE VALUABLE FLOOR OF CARTER, SLOAN & Co.

Newark, New Jersey


An enterprising assayer of Newark has offered Carter, Sloan & Co. several thousand dollars for the old flooring of their factory and to replace it with a new one. This floor has not been taken up for years, and is thought that there is at least $10,000 worth of gold in it.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - April 1883

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