Page 87 of 100

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Posted: Wed Jan 30, 2019 4:13 am
by dognose
EXHIBITION OF THE WORK OF GILBERT MARKS

London


M. Benjamin Constant is so well known in this country as an artist of admirable power that the exhibition of his portraits which has just opened in the galleries of the Fine Art Society, London, is practically assured of success. He a shows in it an extraordinary versatility and a very remarkable amount of technical skill. He expresses the character and personal type of each of his sitters with splendid vivacity, and he never fails to make his portraits as happy in their artistic qualities as they are in representation of facts. As a display of technical resource the exhibition is thoroughly impressive, for it gives no hint of trickery, and makes no appeal to lovers of sensation. Yet at the same time it is certainly not commonplace, and not wanting in delightful audacity. In the same galleries is to be seen, in addition to the water-colours of Mr. Arthur Severn, and Mr. Burrington, a collection of examples of silver work by Mr. Gilbert Marks. These illustrations of a branch of craftsmanship, which is now coming again into favour after a long period of eclipse, are of extreme value on account of the evidence they afford of the wide range of possibilities that is open to the silversmith who is an artist as well. Mr. Marks is not content with being a designer only; he carries out his designs himself, and so secures for them the right manner of interpretation. He has an excellent appreciation of the possibilities of his material, and makes it respond delightfully to his intentions. Elegance of form and delicacy of detail are the most obvious merits of his work, but it has also an excellence of technical treatment that will appeal convincingly to experts.

Source: The Globe - June 1899

Trev.

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Posted: Thu Jan 31, 2019 4:18 am
by dognose
EXPLOSION WRECKS JEWELRY STORE

Bronx, New York


A terrific explosion, caused by a building contractor blasting foundations for new flat houses, Monday afternoon, wrecked the front of Francis Kronenberger’s store, 1008 Westchester Ave., in the Bronx. William Engels, the watchmaker, who was at work repairing a timepiece, was struck and knocked senseless by a stone weighing 20 pounds or more. A second stone fell on him, injuring his knees. He was taken in an ambulance to Lebanon Hospital. The show cases and the stock of jewelry were considerably damaged. The blasting was at Westchester and Tinton Aves., and the excessive explosion, which injured several persons and damaged a number of stores and apartments, was heard for a mile or more away in all directions.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 2nd August 1905

Trev.

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Posted: Fri Feb 01, 2019 4:11 am
by dognose
SILVERSMITH BEATEN AND ROBBED

New York


Carl Ernest, seventy-six years old, a retired silversmith, who lives in a two-room apartment at No 512 East 14th street, was beaten Into unconsciousness and robbed by two assailants yesterday afternoon. The robbers took two bank books showing deposits amounting to $4500 and a wallet containing $36.

Source: New York Tribune - 12th December 1913

Trev.

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Posted: Sat Feb 02, 2019 6:42 am
by dognose
JAPANESE SILVERSMITH OVERCOME WITH EMOTION

Chicago


Japanese Silversmith Jumps on Stage of Theatre to Worship a Play God

Kanake Esarbe, a Japanese silversmith, on a visit to Chicago, saw “The Darling of the Gods” at the Grand opera house last night, says the Chicago Inter Ocean, and forgot—forgot everything save that his country was at war and that his only brother was on his way to the front, and that facing him on the stage was a war god, the first he had seen In many years, at whose shrine he could offer a prayer and supplication for the welfare of his beloved country and the safety of his brother.

A fever of patriotism, loyalty and filial love blotted all else from his mind. Through three acts he sat nervously, a faraway look In his eyes. The curtain went down on the fourth act. From the center of the stage an Immense war god of the Japanese, such as Esarbe had often prayed to in his youth, looked benignly out over the audience. It was one of the thrilling moments of the play, and a hush hung over the theater. Fascinated, Esarbe gazed with wide open eyes for the space of a second.

Then with a cry that broke the stillness of the house he leaped from his seat. Another moment and he was on the stage bowing reverently before the god. Tears flowed from his eyes and an Impassioned prayer in Japanese poured from his lips. The players on the stage looked on transfixed. The silence, broken only by the rhythm of Esarbe's prayer, was Intense.

With a crash the curtain came down and hid his confusion from the audience. It was several minutes before the players had recovered their composure and the play could proceed. And meanwhile Esarbe, escorted by a policeman, had been taken to the Central station. To Lieutenant Duffy he told his story.

No charge was entered against him and after an hour's detention at the Central station he was released. Esarbe is employed by Tiffany & Co., In New York as a silversmith.


Source: New York Herald - July 1904

Trev.

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Posted: Sun Feb 03, 2019 7:18 am
by dognose
WHITING STRIKE ENDED

New York


The Whiting Manufacturing Company, whose silver finishers to the number of 100 went on strike seven weeks ago for recognition of the union, reported yesterday it had practically broken the strike. The firm employs about 500 silversmiths, finishers, chasers and others, and only the finishers went out. The following statement was made last evening on behalf of the firm:

"We have now seventy men in the place of the strikers, who were supplied by Wadell & Mahon, strike breakers. The men proved to be proficient and are now accustomed to our methods of business, and we can get all the men we want. We anticipate not the slightest trouble and are carrying out our Christmas orders as if there had never been a strike.


Source: The Sun - 2nd December 1906

Trev.

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Posted: Mon Feb 04, 2019 6:26 am
by dognose
WAR TIME BAN ON THE MANUFACTURE OF GEM-SET JEWELLERY

London


Old Rings Serving Today's War Brides

To provide the engagement ring grandmother's jewel case is ransacked in Britain as a result of the ban on the manufacture of gem-set jewelry.

Jewelers in London and throughout the country report that young men bring them rings which have belonged to their mothers, grandmothers and even great-grandmothers to be altered for the bride.


Source: The Evening Star - 31st December 1942

Trev.

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Posted: Tue Feb 05, 2019 6:35 am
by dognose
TWO JEWELLERS BURGLED PROBABLY WITHIN MINUTES

Hull


A very extensive robbery of watches and jewellery was committed on the premises of Mr. Daniel, jeweller and watch-manufacturer, Queen Street, Hull. It seems that Mr. Daniel had occasion, shortly before eleven o'clock in the evening, to go to the Minerva Hotel, and in the course of a quarter of an hour returned, and found the premises apparently in the same secure state as when he left. On entering, however, he noticed a large dog, which he kept in the house, lying on the floor dying, and near him some pieces of liver strongly poisoned, of which he had eaten. The robbers could only have been on the premises from five to ten minutes. A costly case of gold watches, guard-chains, rings, and other jewellery, in value between 1,500l. and 2,000l., were carried off. The thieves carefully locked the door after them. A second burglary took place in the same street on the premises of Mr. Gardener, most probably by the same parties, and nearly at the same time. The proprietor was in the habit of sleeping on the premises, but he did not do so on this night. The door was fastened with two patent padlocks and a lock in the door. All these the thieves had most cleverly unlocked, and after plundering the interior, relocked them as if nothing had occurred. On Mr. Gardener opening his shop on the following morning, his suspicions were aroused on finding that the key would not enter the lock of an iron safe, trebly locked, which held the most valuable portion of his stock. A locksmith was then sent for, who picked the locks, and the contents of the safe were discovered to be stolen. The booty consisted of seventeen gold watches, twenty silver, all new, and nearly twenty secondhand; gold chains and guards, diamond-pins and rings, gold and silver snuff-boxes, &c., in value near 3,000l.

Source: The Annual Register - March 1846

Trev.

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Posted: Wed Feb 06, 2019 4:52 am
by dognose
THE PURCHASE OF MEDALS ILLEGAL

London


Lionel Green, a Soho jeweller, was summoned at Westminster Police-court for purchasing medals from a private soldier. He was ordered to pay treble the Government value of the medals, £3 12s., and a fine of £10, or undergo two months' imprisonment.

Source: The Record and Advertiser - 27th June 1903

Trev.

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Posted: Fri Feb 08, 2019 4:27 am
by dognose
ENGINE FAILURE CAUSES SHUT-DOWN OF SILVERSMITHS

New York


The Manhattan Silver Plate Co.’s factory, Lyons, N. Y., which has been shut down for several weeks past on account of a break in the engine, started up again July 30th. The New Haven Silver Plate Co.’s factory, which was obliged to shut down on account of the shut-down of the Manhattan, is running again, as is also A. H. Towar & Co.’s new factory on Water St.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 8th August 1894

Trev.

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Posted: Sat Feb 09, 2019 4:09 am
by dognose
LOST FOR OVER FIFTY YEARS

San Francisco


New York, Aug. 28. A romance of the early fifties is made public by the announcement of the law firm of Niebrugge & Maxfield that it has discovered the widow of Joseph W. Kendregen, a Waterbury (Conn.) silversmith, who died two years ago, leaving more than $200.000.

Mrs. Kendregen is nearly eighty years old and Is living In San Francisco, where she went after her separation from her husband, more than fifty years ago. She is in ill health and poor, and the full extent of her good fortune has not been told to her, as It is feared the sudden announcement of relief from poverty might prove fatal.

A motion to allow her dower rights In Kendregen's estate was filed last Wednesday in the Probate court of Waterbury, and Mrs. Kendregen will
be brought from San Francisco as soon as her health will permit the strain of the trip.

According to the lawyers, Kendregen married Miss Mary Cahill in this city In 1855. A daughter was born, but shortly after the child's birth Mrs.
Kendregen left her husband and went West.

The husband a year later got a divorce alleging duress. Mrs. Kendregen's lawyers declare, however, that the divorce proceedings were not legal, as notice of the action never was served on the woman.

After the divorce Kendregen moved to Waterbury, where he amassed a fortune as a silversmith. He died without leaving a will, and the first
intimation of his early matrimonial venture was made through the public administrator, who found the dead man had been searching for his wife
for more than two year previous to his death. The hunt was continued, and a month ago Mrs. Kendregen was discovered in San Francisco.

The daughter has not been found. Mrs. Kendregen was compelled to place the child in an institution after separation from her husband. When she returned to get the girl Mrs. Kendregen found the little one had adopted and that all trace of the child's foster parents had been lost.


Source: Bridgeport Evening Farmer - 28th August 1909

Trev.

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Posted: Sun Feb 10, 2019 5:50 am
by dognose
FLEEING THE SIEGE OF PARIS

Brussels


Brussels is now full of fugitives from France, and among the wealthier classes sauve qui peut is said to have become the order of the day. A letter from Brussels states that the Imperial Court jeweller had arrived there from Paris with thirty large cases of valuables.

Source: The County Observer and Monmouthshire Central Advertiser - 10th September 1870

Trev.

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Posted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 7:20 am
by dognose
THOMAS HAMLET'S PREMISES DUE FOR DEMOLITION

London


IMPROVEMENTS IN THE METROPOLIS

The new street, from the west, will take a direction north-east by north. It will commence opposite to Coventry-street; and, by the removal of the south side of Sidney's-alley, (taking in Mr. Hamlet's, the goldsmith, and Mr. Gibbon's, the saddler, both in Whitcomb-street,) the line will be formed, by the north side of Leicester-square. Then it will proceed, in a gentle curve, due north, cutting-away Cranborne-alley ; and henceforward the line will be straight into the grand street, and opposite Long-acre. This sweep will be effected by the removal of all the houses in Cranborne-alley, the west end of Bear-street, the east end of Great Newport-street, part of Ryder's court, and the corridor leading into the Panorama. The new street, on entering the grand street, will terminate the improvements in that quarter.

The grand street will nearly annihilate all the triangular streets, which are very numerous about the Seven Dials, and particularly, Great and Little Earl-street, and Tower-street.


Source: The Age - 18th September 1825

Trev.

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Posted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 4:56 am
by dognose
ARTHUR MANVELL

London - New York


Arthur Manvell, fifty-six years old, a native of London, England, and a silversmith by trade, arrived in New York on the President Garfield last Thursday and today applied to the District Court for his first naturalisation papers. His son, William, twenty years old, accompanied his father, and also declared his intention of becoming an American citizen. The wife is still In England, it was stated, but expects soon to come to America.

Source: The Evening Star - 18th November 1922

Trev.

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Posted: Wed Feb 13, 2019 4:59 am
by dognose
HOLMES & EDWARDS MEXICAN FLATWARE

United States


The Mexican grade of table ware made by Holmes & Edwards Silver Co., Bridgeport, which is unplated and, therefore, extremely serviceable where severe and constant use is required, has received an excellent test and endorsement by reason of the fact that it has been used in the equipment of the yacht Carnegie, which, as is well known, is sailing on the scientific expedition, taking magnetic observations all over the world.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 15th September 1909

Trev.

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Posted: Thu Feb 14, 2019 6:01 am
by dognose
PHOTOGRAPHIC JEWELLERY

United Kingdom


.....We should not make the insinuation of neglect against photographers if we were not certain that there was business in this particular specialty, but that there is we have the strongest evidence, and that others outside the photographic profession are profiting by it is equally certain. For commercial purposes we can assume a miniature to be any small picture, or photograph, from the “photo-button” to the genuine hand-painted ivory. Between these two is a range of articles at any and every price. We need say little about the ivory' miniature which sells from ten guineas and upwards, because the businesses in which it can be offered are, for the most part, in the hands of men fully alive to its value. The miniature is almost invariably extra business, and it would very possibly surprise those who have left it out of their programme to discover the total which it may amount to at the end of the year. For the middle-class and lower-class business the miniature can change its form. It can be as cheap as you like, and assume the shape of a locket, pendant, brooch, or scarf-pin. The fact that active business is done in this “ photographic jewellery ” by jewellers and silversmiths in the very towns where the photographer complains of slackness in custom is a reason for believing that tightness of money is not the only cause of diminished receipts. Business of this kind is rightly the photographer’s, but if he does not look after it someone else will. ....

Source: The British Journal of Photography - 18th August 1905

Trev.

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Posted: Fri Feb 15, 2019 4:09 am
by dognose
THE DEATH OF CYRIL CRICHTON

France


Cyril Crichton, only son of Mr. Lionel Crichton, head of the firm of Crichton Bros., the leading silversmiths of London, N.Y. and Chicago, and a Second Lieut. in the English Royal Fusiliers was killed in battle at the front in Northern France on March 10 last. Lieut. Crichton, who was only 22, would have been in the N. Y. house of Crichton Bros. this season had he not felt it his duty to serve his country. The sympathies of the art trade everywhere are expressed for Lieut. Crichton's parents in their great loss.

Source: American Art News - 27th March 1915

Trev.

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Posted: Sat Feb 16, 2019 5:44 am
by dognose
THE NEW SILVER COINAGE

London


The workmen at the Royal Mint are daily at work in striking off the new silver coinage, a considerable amount of which has been sent to the Bank of England within the last few days. The panic respecting the light gold currency having subsided, the Governor and Company of the Bank of England will shortly give notice that they will issue the new silver coinage at the Bullion-office in exchange for the old coinage of George III., George IV., and William IV., which are so defaced from wear and tear and deficient in weight. The public will not in any way be losers by the calling in of the old silver, arrangements having been made between the Government and the Bank to that effect. A very large quantity of the new coinage has been sent off by railway since Monday to the different branch banks in the manufacturing and agricultural districts of England, Wales, and Scotland. As the Bank receives it, the clerks will have it so defaced as not to be reissued, and it will be remelted at the Mint. The quantity of bullion at present in the Bank is nearly 10,000,000 sterling —a larger amount than for many years.

Source: The Cambrian - 24th February 1844

Trev.

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Posted: Sun Feb 17, 2019 5:28 am
by dognose
THE BRIDGEPORT SILVER PLATE Co. (Bridgeport Silverware Co.)

Bridgeport, Connecticut


SUIT FOR $4,000 AGAINST BROTHERS BROUGHT BY SILVERWARE COMPANY

Alleging that Francis H. Macfarlane and Thomas E. Macfarlane violated their agreement not to engage in the manufacture of coffin handles and name plates in this city, C. D. S. Miller and Percy S. Hill, who operate the Bridgeport Silverware Mfg. Co., have started suit against the Macfarlane brothers for $4,000. Papers in the action were filed in the Superior Court today and are returnable to the October term.

Miller and Hill say they acquired the property of the Bridgeport Silverware Co. from the Macfarlane brothers in pursuance of the agreement that the latter would not engage In the coffin hardware business in this city within a period of five years. The agreement provided that the Macfarlane brothers would pay a penalty of S3,500 if they violated this agreement. It is claimed they have refused to pay the penal sum.


Source: The Bridgeport Times - 25th September 1919

Trev.

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Posted: Mon Feb 18, 2019 6:08 am
by dognose
WATSON, NEWELL Co.

Attleboro, Massachusetts


Watson, Newell Co. have purchased an enormous stamp from the Mossberg & Granville Mfg. Co. Its weight is 17 tons and it is far and away the largest thing of the kind in this section. The weight of the hammer is 1,200 pounds and the hammer is intended for the heaviest kind of work.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 1st September 1897

Trev.

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Posted: Tue Feb 19, 2019 6:40 am
by dognose
JEWELLER STRUCK BY LIGHTNING AND LIVES

Buckingham, Buckinghamshire


During a severe thunderstorm at Buckingham a travelling jeweller from Northampton, named Handford, whilst sheltering behind a hawthorn bush, was struck by lightning. A farmer, named Tibbith, seeing the fallen bush on fire, went to the spot, and found Handford in flames, and the jewellery from his broken box scattered in all directions. Handford was severely burned, and it seems marvellous that he did not instantly lose his life.

Source: Llangollen Advertiser - 8th August 1890

Trev.