The Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

For information you'd like to share - Post it here - not for questions
dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 51404
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Apr 18, 2018 4:10 am

HARVEY OSBORN SILVER Co.

Newark, New Jersey


The Harvey Osborn Silver Co. had incorporation papers recorded in the County Clerk’s office last week. The company will manufacture and sell silver goods. The capital stock is placed at $10,000, and business will be commenced with $1,000. The incorporators are I. Harvey Osborn, O. J. Ahlstrous and Justus E. Zender.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 31st March 1897

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 51404
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Apr 19, 2018 2:32 am

GOLD FROM THE SEA

New York


Our men of science have long known that the sea was the largest gold and silver mine we possess; - held in solution - but it has been reserved for an American company to put the idea into practice. The United States Assay Office in New York has, we are told, recently received a consignment of thirteen cones of bullion, weighing altogether ninety-two ounces, which were recovered from the Atlantic by a process of electrolysis. and the exact proportion of gold and silver in the mass will be forthwith determined. If the assay is favourable, surely none of us need go to Klondyke.

Source: Evening Express - 1st April 1898

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 51404
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Apr 20, 2018 1:39 am

RUBIAN-MANNING Co.

Providence, Rhode Island


The Rubian-Manning Company has been organized in Providence, R.I., to manufacture jewelry. They are located at 151 Pine St.

Source: The Brass World and Platers' Guide - March 1910

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 51404
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Apr 21, 2018 5:05 am

SILVERSMITH GOES ON THE RAMPAGE

Sheffield


An extraordinary scene was witnessed in Sheffield last night. A police officer was called to the house of Thomas Field, silversmith, and found the man in the cellar. He had an axe in one hand, and had just cut the gas main. The officer seized him just when he was setting fire to the escaping gas and wrested the axe from him, and knocked up the pipe. Field, however, succeeded in getting out of the cellar and running in to one of the bedchambers, set the bed on fire. The officer followed him, and after some difficulty got the window open, and threw the burning bed into the street, thus saving the house from destruction. The man was arrested, and charged with arson, but the doctor certified that be was suffering from delirium tremens, and not responsible for his actions.

Source: South Wales Echo - 21st January 1885

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 51404
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Apr 22, 2018 6:58 am

MAJOR FIRE AT PROVIDENCE

Providence, Rhode Island


Big Fire Damages Five Jewelry Concerns in Providence, R. I.

Two Employes Injured

Many Saved by Nets and Ladders


Providence, R. I., Jan. 1.—What narrowly escaped being a repetition of the famous Calender St. fire of Nov. 21, 1882, occurred yesterday afternoon in the building occupied by three small jewelry concerns.

Twenty-four men and women were caught in the upper stories of the Dyer block, corner of Weybosset and Mathewson Sts., and were saved by the combined efforts of firemen, patrolmen and citizens by the use of fire nets and ladders and a considerable display of nerve. The bravery of Thomas C. Hudson, head of the chasing and engraving concern of Hudson & Co. and of the Frost Jewelry Co., in returning to the shops of these concerns on the third floor of the building after he had discovered the danger, unquestionably saved a number of lives.

As it was, by the time that the employes were ready to leave the building after Mr. Hudson had given the alarm, they found their exit by the stairway cut off by smoke and flames. In their haste to leave the upper story, in the absence of all fire escapes on the building, two men jumped from the windows and are at the Rhode Island Hospital in a serious Condition, one not being expected to recover.

The fire, which probably originated in the office of the Collateral Loan Co., on the ground floor, in the rear of the main entrance, from an oil stove, caused an estimated loss of nearly $75,090, almost entirely covered by insurance. The principal losers are the Weybosset Jewelry Co., sole agents in Providence for the Reed & Barton Silver Co., Taunton, Mass., which had an unusually large stock of new goods because of the recent holidays, and the Collateral Loan Co., both on the ground floor; Hudson & Co., chasers and engravers, and the Frost Jewelry Co., manufacturers, on the third floor, and Joseph Wheelwright, who also manufactures jewelry in a small way.

When the fire was discovered it had gotten under good headway in the Collateral Loan Co.’s office, and the flames were shooting up the only stairway to the top of the building. The corridors on the second and third floors were filled with fire and smoke, effectually blocking the only way to the street.

Thomas C. Hudson, head of the jewelry concerns, was going down the stair when he was confronted by a great volume of smoke. He retraced his steps to give the alarm, and thus cut himself off from escape. Rushing into the shop, where his son, who is manager of Hudson & Co., and more than a score of girls and men were working, he told them that the place was on fire and that they had no time to lose if they wished to get out.

There was a rush of all for the stairs. They got no further than the door, however, when they were met by a wall of flame that had licked up the partitions and the stairway. Returning into the shops they rushed to the windows. Before anyone could stop him, one of the chasers, Herman Wittum, 21 years old, jumped out. He struck on his back on the sidewalk and probably fractured his spine. Two other men jumped, but were saved from injury by the life nets. Norman Robertson landed in the net, but rebounded and fell to the sidewalk.

By this time the ladders had been raised and, forming a human chain, the firemen soon had all the women down in safety. Mr. Hudson was the last to leave the place and was taken down the ladder. Before leaving the building Mr. Hudson made a personal tour of the shops and finding that all had left he went down the ladder. He then made a personal tour of the stores in the vicinity, and, having accounted for all the help in the shops, reported the fact to Chief Weeks.

The damage in the shops of Hudson & Co., the Frost Jewelry Co. and Joseph Wheelwright is chiefly by smoke and water, although some damage was occasioned by the heat. The combined losses will amount to about $5,000 or $6,000. The loss to the Collateral Loan Co. will amount to between $10,000 and $15,000. In the show windows of the Weybosset Co., at the breaking out of the fire, were several thousand dollars worth of diamonds, while a second window was devoted entirely to cut glass and two others to silverware.

An examination of the Weybosset Co.’s store this morning leaves no doubt about the heavy damage sustained. The show cases were nearly destroyed and all kinds of jewelry was twisted and broken. The cut glass was broken, and it is estimated that the damage will reach $25,000 to $30,000. Three hundred watches in a case in the front of the shop of the Collateral Loan Co., which had been secured on loans or had been sent in for repairs, were fortunately not touched by the fire, and the thoughtfulness of an employe in taking them out saved the company much trouble.

Hudson & Co. and the Frost Jewelry Co. expect to be in operation in a few days in their old shops, but it is doubtful if the Weybosset Jewelry Co. and the Collateral Loan Co. will be ready to reopen for two or three weeks.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 5th January 1910

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 51404
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Apr 23, 2018 2:35 am

MUST NOT MARRY GENTILES

London


Mr Solonion Phillips, of 33, Wimpole-street, jeweller and silversmith, whose estate was valued for probate yesterday at £73,113, after making provision for his wife, left the residue of his property amongst his children, with a proviso that any of them who should marry outside the pale of the Jewish faith should lose his or her share.

Source: Evening Express - 21st October 1908

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 51404
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Apr 24, 2018 2:15 am

HOYT SILVER Co.

Milford, Connecticut


Charter of incorporation has been granted to the Hoyt Silver Company, of Milford, newly organized, which will manufacture flat and hollow silver ware, knives, tea-pots, coffee-pots, cream pitchers, bread trays, waiters, and a special kind of stainless steel for spoons and forks. This latter is a new industry, said to be the first of its kind in the United States.

Source: The Metal Industry - September 1922

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 51404
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Apr 25, 2018 2:32 am

THE JEWELRY CAPITAL OF THE UNITED STATES

Newark, New Jersey


The city of Newark claims to manufacture seven-eighths of all the fine jewelry produced in the United States and contains 114 jewelry factories.

Source: The Brass World and Platers' Guide - June 1912

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 51404
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Apr 26, 2018 4:17 am

MOTOR-CAR DEMOLISHES SILVERSMITH's SHOP

London


In the King's Bench Division yesterday, Mr. Justice Darling and a common jury had before them the action of Gay v. Lord. This was an action to recover damages for injury caused to a shop in Regent-street by a motor car driven by the defendant. The defendant denied negligence, and also the alleged damage. It. was stated that the plaintiff was Mr. Leonard Gay, a silversmith, 91, Regent-street, W. On April 23 last the defendant, Mr. Oswald Lord, was driving along Regent-street at 1.50 a.m. There was besides the defendant, a lady and gentleman in the car, and it subsequently transpired that both the gentlemen were drunk. The car was being driven by the defendant at a rate of between 25 and 30 miles an hour along the wrong side of the road, and when near the circus he put on the brake in order to stop it, but too late, for the car skidded backwards across the pavement, knocking down a man, who was seriously injured, and crashing through the revolving shutters and window of the plaintiff's shop, doing damage which the plaintiff estimated at £1,175 4s. Evidence having been given, the jury awarded the plaintiff £600 damages. - Judgment was entered accordingly, with costs.

Source: Evening Express - 13th December 1902

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 51404
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Apr 27, 2018 4:48 am

COUNTERFEIT SILVERWARE

New York and London


Apropos of the recent unpleasant revelations regarding the selling by a number of the great retail firms of New York of articles in silver that were marked “ sterling,” but which on being assayed turned out to be more or less brazen imitations, the exposure of a fraud in the silverware trade has lately created a sensation in England.

It should likewise be of interest to wealthy Americans, for there can be little doubt that the firm in question has had many American customers. Mr. Labouchere in his paper, Truth, brought the scandal to light. It appears that one of his readers bought at a very high price some supposedly
antique pieces of silverware, but that they turned out to be very clever imitations, stamped with forged marks and dates. The firm which sold them is one of the most famous in Europe for such articles, and its Bond St. shop is one of the attractions of that famous thoroughfare in the very fashionable end of London. In the last issue to hand of Truth Mr. Labouchere says:

“ The exposure of the dealings of Messrs. Munday & Son in forged antique silverplate has created very widespread interest in the trade and among collectors. The point to which it seems most desirable to draw attention is the systematic failure of the Goldsmiths’ Company to enforce the law which makes it a felony to knowingly sell plate bearing a forged mark. It stands to reason that it is only by enforcing in a criminal court the penalties thus provided that the traffic in forged goods can be effectually stopped.

“ Only by the inconvenience and disgrace of a sojourn in jail can such a dealer be deterred from his evil practices. As long therefore, as the Goldsmiths’ Company contents itself, as it has done, with levying pecuniary penalties, it is to be expected that the fraudulent trade will grow and prosper. From all sides I hear evidence that it has done so.”


Source: Mail and Express (New York) - June 1895

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 51404
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Apr 28, 2018 3:36 am

CHEMICAL CRYSTALS FRAUD

London

Armand Gilbert, a Belgian, who was brought up at Bow-street on Saturday on the remanded charge of endeavouring to defraud a silversmith by selling him crystals which he said would produce colour gilding on metals, was sentenced to six months imprisonment, and recommended for deportation. The crystals were ferri-cyanide of potassium, cyanide, and rock-alum, worth only a few pence. There were other charges, and it was stated that the man had been living on this fraud for five years.

Source: Evening Express - 23rd May 1910

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 51404
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Apr 29, 2018 5:55 am

THE SALE OF THE EGLINTON JEWELS

London


The recent sale in London of the celebrated Eglinton family jewels drew a large crowd. There were only fourteen lots, but they were all extremely handsome and interesting. The celebrated black pearl necklace was bought by Sir J. Blundell Maple for £3,500. Some people thought this a great price, but those who understand these things are of opinion that, as the pearls cannot be matched, their value is limitless. They are of remarkable size and beauty and are set in a cluster of brilliants connected with chain pattern links of diamonds.

There was a splendid diamond star, with a very large stone in the centre, and four smaller ones, forming a head ornament; four or five handsome bracelets, a pair of large pear-shaped earrings, a beautiful blue enamelled necklace, and the famous necklace, earrings and brooch which formerly belonged to Mary Queen of Scots. These jewels, together with a picture of Holbein, which now hangs in Eglinton Castle, were given by Queen Mary to Mary Seton, who was one of the well known “ Queen’s Marys.” The picture and necklace were brought into the Eglinton family by the marriage of a Montgomery (the family name of the Eglintons) with the heir of the Setons. They were found in the muniment room of Eglinton Castle.

These family relics were sold for the late Earl’s daughters. Having no son, he left them between his four daughters, but as they were of such very unequal value it was impossible to divide them satisfactorily, so they had to be sold. The present Earl is the uncle of these ladies, having succeeded his brother in 1892. He is about forty-six and was in the Grenadier Guards. Both he and his brother were the sons of the Earl who held the wonderful medieval tournament in 1839 at his castle in Scotland, at which the Duchess of Somerset, then Lady Seymour, was declared the Queen of Beauty. She was one of the three beautiful and celebrated sisters, daughters of Tom Sheridan.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 18th April 1894

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 51404
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Apr 30, 2018 3:27 am

ALFRED VESTER & SONS

Rhode Island


The American Jewelers' Findings Coroporation of Pawtucket, R.I., have taken over the business of Alfred Vester & Sons, Providence, R.I., manufacturers of metal ornaments and jewelers' findings.

Source: The Brass World and Platers' Guide - April 1913

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 51404
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue May 01, 2018 4:28 am

BLANCARD & Co., Inc.

Newark, New Jersey


Blancard & Co., Inc., Newark N. J., has been incorporated to engage as a manufacturing jeweler at $750,000. The incorporators are Frederick J. and Rudolph C. Blancard, 161 Maiden Lane, New York, and Thomas Mountford, 242 Hedden Street, Newark, N. J.

Source: The Iron Age - 22nd July 1920

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 51404
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed May 02, 2018 2:41 am

GREAT FIRE DESTROYS FIFTEEN FIRM'S PREMISES

New York


From New York papers of the 7th instant, received on Sunday at Queenstown, it appears that New York has been visited by another destructive fire, the damage of which is estimated at two million dollars, the fire broke out on the 6th instant in a block of buildings in Bond street, occupied by jewellers, watchmakers, and silversmiths. The houses, which were elaborately fitted up, were iron fronted, and considered to be fire proof. Notwithstanding there were sixteen fire engines and ten lines of hose at work, the destruction of the buildings was complete, and fifteen firms of jewellers, silversmiths, and watchmakers were burned out. Four of the firemen were injured.

Source: Monmouthshire Merlin - 23rd March 1877

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 51404
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu May 03, 2018 2:44 am

WOODMAN-COOK Co.

Portland, Maine


The Woodman-Cook Co., has been formed at Portland, Me., with $25,000 capital, $15,000 paid in, to manufacture silver-plated ware. The officers are as follows : President, E. B. Cook ; treasurer, F. H. Woodman ; vice-president, C. H. Fessenden ; directors, E. B. Cook, F. H Woodman, Chas. Cook, J. F. Woodman, C. H. Fessenden.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 22nd February 1893

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 51404
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri May 04, 2018 10:06 am

THE FRANKLIN SILVER PLATE Co. START MANUFACTURING FLATWARE

Greenfield, Massachusetts


The Franklin Silver Plate Company of Greenfield, Mass., who have heretofore manufactured nothing but silver plated cutlery, have now started in the manufacture of high grade flat-ware and are making it from the best grades of German-silver base.

Source: The Brass World and Platers' Guide - September 1913

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 51404
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat May 05, 2018 1:59 am

BRITISH INDUSTRIES FAIRS

London, Glasgow and Birmingham


The British Industries Fair of 1921 is proposed to be held in London, Glasgow and Birmingham. The London Fair is directly organized by the Imperial Department of Overseas Trade on behalf of the British Board of Trade, while the Fairs in Birmingham and Glasgow are organized by the municipalities of the respective cities under the auspices and with the support of the British Board of Trade. These fairs are not Exhibitions. They are trade fairs to which admittance is restricted to bona fide trade buyers seriously interested in the participating trades. Only British manufacturing firms are allowed to exhibit, and no exhibitor is permitted to exhibit goods other than those of his actual manufacture.

Source: The Retail Druggist of Canada - November 1920

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 51404
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun May 06, 2018 2:06 am

BENSON'S ARGENTINE

London


Mr. J.W. Benson, the well-known silversmith, of Cornhill, has introduced to public notice a first-class specimen of Argentine, as applied to spoons, forks, and other articles of domestic use. Their appearance is certainly such that, but for the absence of the customary credentials of silver, detection would be almost impossible. They are warranted not to tarnish, and with proper use they would stand a very long course of hard wear.

Source: British Standard - 15th March 1861

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 51404
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon May 07, 2018 6:42 am

THE NEW YORK SILVER PLATE Co.

New York


The New York Silver Plate Co., manufacturers of silver plated ware at 337 107th St., New York, made an assignment Thursday to Eli M. Cohen without preference. Emil Magnus is president and Stephen C. Duval secretary. The company were incorporated in September, 1896, with a capital stock of $25,000, and succeeded to the business carried on at 20 Warren St. by Mr. Magnus, who made an assignment July 6, 1896. Deputy Sheriff Whoriskey received an execution against the company an hour and 20 minutes ahead of the assignment for $1,022 in favor of the National Shoe and Leather Bank, and put a keeper in charge. Mr. Cohen said that the liabilities are $5,000 and nominal assets in excess of that sum.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 18th August 1897

Trev.


Return to “Contributors' Notes”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 26 guests