The 19th-20th Century South And Central American Trade

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Re: The 20th Century South And Central American Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Feb 12, 2017 6:32 am

Plated Ware in Brazil

Consul-General George E. Anderson, of Rio de Janeiro, furnishes the following report on the sale and use of silver-plated ware in Brazil:

Apparently there is something of an opening in Brazil for the sale of American plated and hollow ware. The Brazilian people have taken to such goods with increasing readiness, and the present trade would be far larger than it is if it were not for the high tariff on such goods, the customs imposts running about 1½ cents gold per gram, with from 15 to 30 per cent, ad valorem, part of which is payable in gold exchange, depending upon the quality and class of goods. Last year there was imported about $150,000 worth of plated ware, classed as such in the customs returns, more or less coming in under other terms. Of this amount Germany furnished about 50 per cent., France about 25 per cent., Great Britain about 12 per cent., and the United States about 9 per cent. Of the total about one-half was entered at Rio de Janeiro.

There is no reason why American plate should not secure a foothold in Brazil. It is in the same position as regards the trade that the products of any other nation are, and there is a general friendliness toward American goods. American goods have not been pushed here, however, in this as in most other lines, and if there is to be any American trade American manufacturers must expect to undertake the difficulties and labor which go with an introductory campaign. As in other lines, there is little done in Brazil in the way of jobbing in such ware, the goods as a rule being sold by the manufacturer to the dealer. American manufacturers in general must be prepared to extend credit further in the trade of this portion of the world than they do in trade in the United States, both in the matter of time and other terms. Heretofore there has been considerable difficulty on the part of American concerns in establishing a proper basis for credit. In the near future, however, this trouble will probably be obviated by the establishment of a branch of one of the great credit-investigating agencies, preliminary work to that end being now in progress.

In this, as in all other lines of trade in South America, or, indeed, anywhere else abroad, there is need of Americans on the spot to introduce American goods. It is possible that goods can be sold at long distance and that the results will be satisfactory, but the prospect is doubtful; and in view of the fact that European nations have the bulk of South American trade at the present time, that they are prepared to maintain their trade with all the means open to a business strongly established, and that American trade will be established here in general only after a hard fight and in the face of the keenest competition, it is only reasonable to expect success in establishing such trade will come only by the use of the best means possible. It is probable that in the plated and hollow ware trade a trip to Brazil by a good salesman able to speak Portugese, or at least able to adapt himself to Brazilian conditions, and the establishment of local agencies will be all that is necessary or all that the trade will stand. But there is trade in South America to be had, trade upon a permanent basis, covering a large and increasing population, which is reaching out more and more for foreign goods, representing the most advanced demands of civilized people.

There is some plated ware manufactured in Brazil, but I do not believe it can compete with foreign-made goods properly introduced.

American manufacturers contemplating a campaign in behalf of plated-ware goods or wares generally sold in silversmiths', goldsmiths', and jewelers' establishments may be able to accomplish something by writing to concerns in Rio de Janeiro. (The names may be obtained from the Bureau of Manufactures.)


Source: Fabrics, Fancy-Goods and Notions - November 1906

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Re: The 20th Century South And Central American Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Aug 28, 2017 7:05 am

JUERGENS JEWELRY COMPANY

Mexico City


LOW-PRICED JEWELRY IN LATIN AMERICA

Since the beginning of the European war the demand for low-priced jewelry in Latin America has consistently increased. Many of the nations of the American continent who before the war obtained their jewelry, from the Old World, turned their eyes in the direction of the United States with the result that at the present time hundreds of thousands of dollars' worth of jewelry are being exported annually from this country. The merchants in the southern countries have found that the North American product is of a superior quality and that the price is lower than the European. There is thus little if any doubt that the trade has been definitely established and that even when the war ends the exports of low-priced jewelry from this country will continue to grow from year to year. In the development of this foreign trade, Henry F. Juergens, proprietor of the Juergens Jewelry Company, 83 Chambers street, New York, has borne a conspicuous part. Mr. Juergens, who for more than 23 years has been active in the manufacture of jewelry, is constantly traveling in the Latin American countries, studying the needs, requirements and customs of the trade in each locality. As a result of his observations, new designs in jewelry have come to light upon his return after each trip, and these new designs have been received with favor by southern buyers. This firm has lately opened a branch in the City of Mexico, under the management of Messrs. Carter and Donovan, who are also experts in the manufacture of jewelry. Mr. Juergens is also considering the establishment of a branch factory in Brazil, which, like the one in Mexico City, will be equipped with the most modern machinery in use in the manufacture of jewelry. Other branch factories will be opened in South America when conditions warrant. The specialty of the Juergens Jewelry Company is earrings and bracelets made of a good grade of gold filled wire. They are the exclusive manufacturers of the well known “Recuerdo” jewelry. They also manufacture stick-pins, brooches, tie clasps, necklaces and other jewelry. They have just issued an attractive catalogue in Spanish for 1918, showing all the latest jewelry novelties.


Source: American Exporter - January 1918

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Re: The 20th Century South And Central American Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Nov 09, 2017 6:23 am

REPORTS FROM THE CONSULS OF THE UNITED STATES IN ANSWER TO INSTRUCTIONS FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE


At the request of a Massachusetts firm, a Department instruction was sent, under date of January 16, 1902, to the consular officers of the United States, directing them to report in regard to the trade in foreign countries in silverware and plated ware, and especially as to the possible market for articles of American manufacture. Special information was asked as to the consumption of such goods in the respective consular districts; the extent of local manufacture; the importation from foreign countries as well as from the United States; the tariff on silver and plated goods; the obstacles to the extension of American trade in this line, if any existed; the proper methods of packing, etc.

The answers follow:

SOUTH AMERICA

ARGENTINE REPUBLIC

IMPORTS

As near as I could get, the quantities of plated ware imported during 1901 were as follows, in pounds:

Germany - 60,000
France - 40,000
United States - 40,000
Belgium - 20,000
England - 16,000
Italy - 10,000

The extent of local manufactures is not very large. One manufactory, with a personnel of about 20 men, runs the whole year and makes plated ware, using brass as a base.

On account of the concern selling the goods direct to hotels, restaurants, etc., jobbers and retailers buy only the imported goods. The quantity or output of this manufactory is difficult to ascertain.


TARIFF

The tariff on French goods of “ Christofle ” and on the English brand of “ Elkington” is about $2.50, gold, per kilo (2.2046 pounds). Plated ware of American manufacture, such as Reed & Barton, Meriden, Simpson, Miller, Hall & Co., Bayor & Co., pay about $1.40, gold, per kilo. Inferior American articles pay about 80 Cents, gold, per kilo. In the weight of the articles the wrapping is also considered; therefore it ought to be as light as possible, so that the duty will be less.


OUTLOOK FOR AMERICAN WARE

All the articles of American manufacture mentioned above find a better market here than any other similar article of foreign manufacture. For five years past articles of plated ware made in Germany, manufactured of iron and lead, and of more inferior grade to those made in other countries, were imported into this country, and found a good market among the working class of people on account of being sold very cheap. Among the better class of people plated ware manufactured in France and England is preferred. Plated ware of American manufacture could also be imported on a large scale if the manufacturers will follow the request of the buyer here regarding the mode of packing, as it seems that the manufacturer packs to suit himself and not as requested by the importer, the importer having good reasons for having the goods packed according to his wishes.

D. MAYER, Consul
BUENOS AYRES, March 7, 1902.


Source: Special Consular Reports - Silver and Plated Ware in Foreign Countries - Bureau of Foreign Commerce, Department of State - 1902

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Re: The 20th Century South And Central American Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Dec 11, 2017 5:24 am

ROBERT H. INGERSOLL & BROTHER

Buenos Aires


Robt. H. Ingersoll & Bro., 315 Fourth Avenue, New York City, manufacturers of watches, are about to open in Buenos Aires, Argentine Republic.

Source: Metal Record and Electroplater - June 1916


Death of Robert A. Piatt

Robert Arnold Piatt, manager of the South American branch office of Robt. H. Ingersoll & Bro., New York, died of pneumonia suddenly on Oct. 14, a few days after his return from Buenos Aires. Together with A. Kaltbrinner he had managed the concern's office in that city from July, 1916, to July, 1918.

Mr. Piatt was a nephew of R. H. and C. H. Ingersoll and a cousin of W. H. Ingersoll. He was a native of Lansing, Mich., a graduate of the University of Michigan and had formerly been the office manager of the company in New York and a salesman in Virginia previous to his going to South America.

The day of his funeral was to have been his wedding day. He was engaged to Miss Helen Caldwell, of New York, who was stricken with the same disease and was not expected to live, but ultimately regained her health.

The body was taken to Lansing, Mich., for burial.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 6th November 1918

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Re: The 20th Century South And Central American Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Dec 23, 2017 4:56 am

Facts Regarding Guatemala

From Bulletin No. 32 on the subject of Guatemala, issued by the Bureau of the American Republics are gleaned the following facts regarding this Central American nation. In the department of Quiche these are among others gold, silver and opal mines which when properly worked, it is
claimed will prove a source of great wealth for the country. The jewelry, watches, etc. imported into Guatemala come chiefly from Switzerland and the United States. The value of these articles imported in 1889 was $81,970, on which duties of $9,426.55 were paid; in 1890 the figures were $122,550 and $14,093.25. The managers of the Central Railroad of Guatemala reserve the right to increase the prices, among others, in the following tariff and to reduce the same in all or in part, according to circumstances: First class for the entire distance from the port of San Jose to the city of Guatemala, $150 per cwt., 30 per ton of 2,000 pounds : Jewels and jewelry of all kinds, clocks, scientific and musical instruments.

On the free import list are diamonds and other precious stones unset; articles paying 10 per cent, on invoice valuation, clocks for towers, with dials and bells, crucibles, hourglasses, instruments used in the sciences, jewelry, gold at least .600 fine, silver, at least .835 fine, table service, silver at least .835 fine, gold at least .600 fine, watches, gold at least .600 fine, silver at least .835 fine; articles paying 70 per cent., clocks, wall table, or metal and imitation gold and silver watches, jewelry imitation, not specified in the second part of the schedule, musical boxes.

From the volume we learn that the following do business as watchmakers and jewelers : In Guatemala, Francisco Arriola, Carlos Bravaix, J. M. Castro, Ramon Duran, Enrique Gauvin, Salvador Guerrero, Marcelino Motlet, Diego B. Najero, Jorge Rodeman, Emilio Rosenberg, Frederico Widmer; in Retalhuleu, Otto Fuchard; in Salama, Francisco Presa; in Totonicapan; Delfino Cordova.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 16th November 1892

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Re: The 20th Century South And Central American Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Mar 19, 2018 2:02 pm

A Listing of Jewellers and Watchmakers working at Belize, British Honduras, in 1897:

Jewellers

Arjonilla, A.
Keating, N.J. (Successor to A.E. Morlan)
Lyzama, M.
Stevens, John
Vega, M.F.

Watchmakers

Keating, N.J. (Successor to A.E. Morlan)
Pophenken, A.


Source: Commercial Directory of the American Republics - 1897

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Re: The 20th Century South And Central American Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Mar 25, 2018 6:54 am

LINDEMANN

Montevideo


Image
Lindemann - Montevideo - 1946

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Re: The 20th Century South And Central American Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Apr 06, 2018 1:29 pm

ARTURO MEDINA

Bogata, Columbia


Image

Image
AM - 0900


The standard indicated as '0,900'

Member blakstone wrote:

Arturo Medina of Bogata. I have very little other information other than he was working from the 1930s to the 1960s.

See: viewtopic.php?f=32&t=50403

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Re: The 20th Century South And Central American Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Apr 30, 2018 3:36 am

ONÉSIMO HUMBERT

Primera Calle Nacional, Morelia, Mexico


Image
Onésimo Humbert - Morelia - 1884

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Re: The 20th Century South And Central American Trade

Postby dognose » Tue May 08, 2018 11:43 am

RAFAEL ANZURES

Esquina de Santa Clara 11, and, Estanco de Hombres 11, Puebla, Mexico


Image
Rafael Anzures - Puebla - 1884

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Re: The 20th Century South And Central American Trade

Postby dognose » Wed May 30, 2018 12:25 pm

JOSÉ DE OLIVEIRA COUTINHO

Rua das Violas 142, Rio de Janeiro


Image
José De Oliveira Coutinho - Rio de Janeiro - 1854

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Re: The 19th-20th Century South And Central American Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Jun 08, 2018 2:34 pm

LOUIS LONG

Portal de Soto, Plaza Principal, Leon, Mexico


Image
Louis Long - Leon - 1884

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Re: The 19th-20th Century South And Central American Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Jul 14, 2018 5:55 am

CARLOS VALLAIS

Rua do Ouvidor 81, Rio de Janeiro


Image
Carlos Vallais - Rio de Janeiro - 1854

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Re: The 19th-20th Century South And Central American Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Dec 13, 2018 7:01 am

A.C. SMITH

Apartdo 92 Bis., Mexico, D.F.


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A.C. Smith - Mexico, D.F. - 1909

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A.C. Smith - Mexico, D.F. - 1914


Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Calvert Smith announce the marriage of their daughter, Marguerite, to William Henry Fowlie. Mr. Fowlie, who is the manager of the New York office of the Elgin National Watch Co., has been with the concern about 15 years. He was first in the Chicago office and later came east as a missionary. Later he became assistant to the late Mr. Kinna of the New York office and upon the death of Mr. Kinna became manager. The bride is the youngest daughter of A. C. Smith, for many years a jobber of watches and jewelry of Mexico City, Mexico, and who has been identified with the jewelry business for many years. Mr. and Mrs. Fowlie have gone south on their honeymoon and are expected to return to New York about Feb. 1.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 23rd January 1918


A.C. Smith was involved in a trade mark dispute with The Western Clock Co. in 1911 over the use of the trade name 'Big Ben' in Mexico.

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Re: The 19th-20th Century South And Central American Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Dec 20, 2018 4:09 pm

RELOJERIA SUIZA de RICARDO INGOLD

25 de Mayo 462, Montevideo


Image
Relojería Suiza de Ricardo Ingold - Montevideo - 1918

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Re: The 19th-20th Century South And Central American Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Mar 19, 2019 2:31 pm

JOSE ANTONIO LINCE

Mexico


Image

Image
José Antonio Lince González


Member Funkel wrote:

The marks correspond to the time of the Spanish Viceroyalty in México.
LCN: Jose Antonio Lince; México and fiscal Brand.


Las marcas corresponden a la época del Virreinato español en México.
LCN: José Antonio Lince; México y Marca fiscal


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Re: The 19th-20th Century South And Central American Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Apr 17, 2019 1:38 pm

PEDRO E. MATTALDI

667-683, Sarmiento, Buenos Aires


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Pedro E. Mattaldi - Buenos Aires - 1918

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Re: The 19th-20th Century South And Central American Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Apr 30, 2019 2:59 am

RAMÓN GARCÉ DE ALBERTO CAYO

Calle 18 de Julio, 50, Montevideo


Image
Ramón Garcé de Alberto Cayo - Montevideo - 1901

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Re: The 19th-20th Century South And Central American Trade

Postby dognose » Sun May 12, 2019 7:32 am

U. S. APPOINTS JEWELER TO STUDY SOUTH AMERICAN MARKETS

Commerce Bureau to Compile Jewelry and Silverware Data


The Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce of United States Department of Commerce is planning to make a thorough investigation of South American markets for jewelry and silverware for the purpose of obtaining complete and detailed information about these markets to aid American jewelers and silversmiths in building up their trade with Latin-America.

Before the war, South America bought most of these wares abroad, purchasing in this country less than 3 per cent, of her total requirements. But now that their usual sources of supply are cut off, South American countries are depending upon this country in a great measure to furnish these goods.

After examinations were held throughout the country to find a man properly qualified, S. W. Rosenthal was appointed. He is an experienced jeweler, and has had several years' training in export trade, having been the manager of the export department of the Shiman-Miller Manufacturing Co.

He has the endorsement of the National Jewelers' Board of Trade, has a college training and speaks several languages.


Source: Notions and Fancy Goods - August 1917

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Re: The 19th-20th Century South And Central American Trade

Postby dognose » Fri May 31, 2019 4:20 am

CASA BRANDT - JOÃO BRANDT

Rua de Sao Bento 38, San Paulo


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Casa Brandt - Joao Brandt - San Paulo - 1919

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