Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Nov 20, 2019 5:23 am

CHARLES EDWARD TELFREY

Bridgend, Wales


JEWELLER'S SUICIDE

An inquest was held at Bridgend on Tuesday on the body of Charles Edward Telfrey, jeweller's assistant, who was found dead in bed on Monday. Dr. Low attributed death to poisoning, and said that the bottle found near this deceased man contained cyanide of potassium. The jury returned a verdict of "Suicide during temporary insanity."


Source: The Weekly Mail - 10th December 1910

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Nov 24, 2019 7:43 am

ARTHUR HUNT

London


DEATH BEFORE ARREST

JEWELLER'S' ASSISTANT IN THE WEST END COMMITS SUICIDE


London, December 27. - Rather than be hauled off to prison, Arthur Hunt, a Jeweller's assistant, committed suicide in his employer's shop.

For nearly twenty years,Hunt had been in the employ of Mr. Solomon J. Phillips; the well-known New Bond-street jeweller. Upon the death of that gentleman recently the business came under the management of his son, and when the valuers came to make an estimate for probate purposes serious deficiencies were discovered. Suspicion rested on Hunt, who had risen by his apparent stead-fastness and devotion to the Interests of the firm to the position of store-keeper, and a warrant was issued for his arrest.

Detective-Inspector Fowler and a subordinate inspector on Tuesday visited the shop In New Bond-street, and going up to Hunt read the warrant to him. Pointing to an overcoat hanging on the wall, Hunt remarked, 'There is my overcoat, you will find something there.' The officer turned In the direction in which he had pointed and Hunt pulled a revolver from his pocket and shot himself through the heart.

Hunt is believed to have been a married man, but the firm did not know his address, so that they could not notify his friends of his death.


Source: The Daily News - 23rd January 1909

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Nov 26, 2019 4:57 am

MARTIN P. FAY

Providence, Rhode Island


Mrs. Gertrude Fay, 50 years of age, wife of Martin P. Fay, retail jeweler and watchmaker at Providence, R. I., was fatally burned last Saturday morning in spite of the efforts of her husband to save her when her clothing caught fire at their home, 55 Plainfield St. She died several hours later at the Rhode Island Hospital, where she was hurried in an ambulance following the accident. How the accident occurred, Mrs. Fay's condition when the fire was discovered prevented her from explaining, but she was busy about her kitchen gas range, when her husband, whose store is located in a small building adjoining the front of his home, heard her scream. He ran into the kitchen and found her on the floor enveloped in flames. He extinguished the blaze in the small amount of clothing left on her body, and, in so doing, was painfully burned about the hands, arms and face. A physician ordered her removal to the hospital.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 7th February 1923

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Nov 27, 2019 12:40 pm

WILLARD H. WHEELER

New York


TAKES HIS OWN LIFE

Willard H. Wheeler, Formerly of Hayden W. Wheeler & Co., New York, Found Dead in His Bathroom


The trade was shocked and deeply grieved to learn last Thursday of the sudden and untimely death of Willard H. Wheeler, a retired member of the firm of Hayden W. Wheeler & Co., and a watch collector of national prominence. Mr. Wheeler was found in the bathroom of his home at 439 Washington Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y., on Wednesday evening with a bullet hole in his brain and a revolver near his body. Funeral services were held for the deceased at his late home on Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock and were conducted by the Rev. Wood of the Congregational Church, Brooklyn. The interment took place immediately after at Greenwood Cemetery.

Mr. Wheeler was alone in the house when his death occurred. Shortly after 6 o'clock, Mrs. Jean Wheeler, his wife, returned and found the house in darkness. While dinner was in preparation, Mrs. Wheeler's brother arrived. Mrs. Wheeler, assuming that her husband was not at home, told her brother that he would have to wait until Mr. Wheeler returned. While waiting, Mrs. Wheeler's brother went to the bathroom and there found the body of his brother-in-law. In the pocket of the dead man's coat was found a note, in which he stated that his act was caused by the belief that he was losing his mind.

Willard H. Wheeler was a native son of Brooklyn, N. Y., having first seen the light of day in that place on March 11, 1863. He was the son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Hayden W. Wheeler, and attended the Adelphi Academy in Brooklyn. He was later prepared for college at the Greylock Institute, South Williamstown, Mass., and at Dr. Gunn's School, Washington, Conn. He finally entered Amherst College and graduated with the class of 1884.

This class has always been noted for its loyalty to Amherst and also for its loyalty to each of its classmates. Since this class has graduated, the members have held annual class reunions in different parts of the country, most of these having taken place in the east. Mr. Wheeler was secretary of his class for many years and was an untiring worker in getting the members together. He spent a great deal of time keeping in personal touch with each of his classmates and in class reunions.

After his college years Mr. Wheeler entered the stove business and became a member of the firm of E. B. Colby & Co., at that time located on Water St., New York. In 1888, the firm of Wheeler, Parsons & Hays, dealers in jewelry and watches, 2 Maiden Lane, New York, and of which Mr. Wheeler's father was a member, was succeeded by Hayden W. Wheeler & Co., Lewis A. Parsons and Henry Hays, the other two partners, retiring. A few years later, the elder Mr. Wheeler took in as a partner his son, Willard. The latter continued with the firm until 1919, when the business was sold, Mr. Wheeler retiring at that time.

Mr. Wheeler had a national reputation as a watch collector and at the time of his death, had one of the finest and most important collections of timepieces in the world. Just what disposition will be made of this collection will not be known until the will of the deceased is read.

Many jewelers throughout the country will recall having seen Mr. Wheeler's collection at the various State and national conventions. On more than one occasion, Mr. Wheeler loaned his collection to public institutes. The last time it was on public view was at the Brooklyn Museum.

Mr. Wheeler never allowed his collection to number over 100 and he was particular to have each watch represent a different period. If by any chance two watches from the same period came into Mr. Wheeler's hands he always picked out the most representative one and then discarded the other one. Mr. Wheeler was one of the first members of the Jewelers' 24 Karat Club and was also at one time affiliated with the Maiden Lane Historical Society. He was likewise a member of the Crescent Club of Brooklyn.

Deceased is survived by his widow, two sisters, Mrs. Frederick J. Jennings Wood, of London, and Mrs. Amos P. Hawley, of New York, and one brother, Frank L. Wheeler, who resides in Arizona.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 7th February 1923

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Dec 11, 2019 4:40 am

LOWDOR FRAZER

London


FOUND SHOT ON CLAPHAM COMMON

Shortly after four o'clock on Thursday morning, Police-constable 315 of the W Division was on his beat at Clapham Common, and discovered a man lying on the grass, bleeding copiously from a pistol-shot wound. On examination it was found that the bullet had penetrated the lungs. The poor fellow, who is 30 years of age, was identified as Lowdor Frazer, a shopman at a silversmith's, lodging at No. 2, Circular-road, Union-road, Borough, and his relatives live at All Saints, Westbourne-park-road. How the occurrence happened remains a mystery.


Source: South Wales Daily News - 30th August 1878

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Dec 18, 2019 7:00 am

MARY ALICE MOTTRAM

Sheffield


GIRL WIFE STRANGLED

A Sheffield Tragedy


Dramatic developments quickly followed the violent death of Mrs. Mary Alice Mottram (21), of Ravenscarr-road, Sheffield, who was found lying
on the floor of her kitchen, strangled. The discovery was made by her husband, a miner, on his return from work.

Trembling and haggard, Samuel Case (24), & miner, of Woodhouse-lane, Intake, Sheffield, staggered into the dock at Sheffield Police Court, and
was charged with the wilful murder of Mrs. Mottram.

Police Constable Kirby Shaw told the magistrates that Case stopped him in Snighill, Sheffield, at 11.25 the previous night, and said, "I want to give myself up."

"What for?" asked the officer.

"For murdering a woman at Intake," Case replied.

The policeman arrested him, and he was charged, and made a statement, which was not read. On the application of the police, Case, who is a married man, was remanded in custody. He had nothing to say.

Dozens of neighbors of the dead woman waited from an early to gain admittance to the court.

SHOCK FOR HUSBAND

Mrs. Mottram's tragic fate and the circumstances surrounding her death caused a sensation in the district, and great sympathy is felt for the bereft husband.

Mrs. Mottram, a good-looking girl, worked at a Sheffield cutlery works. She returned home at six p.m., and when her husband, Edward, arrived from his work at Tinsley Park Colliery at about eleven o'clock he found her dead on the floor.

She was lying on her back with her head close to a table and her feet against the wall of the room. Around her throat was a towel, knotted, and on the top of it a piece of clothes-line, which had evidently been cut from a length which was stretched across the kitchen. The clothes-line had two knots in it, and it was evident that the woman had died of asphyxiation.

HALF-EATEN MEAL

Everything in the room was in its accustomed place, and the woman's clothes were not disarranged. A book which Mrs. Mottram had evidently been reading was propped up against an article on the table, where there were also the remains of a half-eaten meal. There was a partly eaten egg and a pint pot half full of tea.

The police were called, and a doctor who examined the body said the woman had apparently been dead for some hours.

Mr. and Mrs. Mottram are described by their neighbors as a quiet and reserved couple. They were married on March 13th 1926, and they lived in
apartments until they obtained the present house in April of this year. They had no children, and the young wife continued her employment at the Sheffield Silver Plating Co., Priestley street.

Only brief evidence of identification was taken at the inquest on Mrs. Mottram, and the coroner adjourned the Inquiry,


Source: The Prahran Telegraph - 22nd December 1927

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Dec 21, 2019 5:11 am

ROBERT G. PORTER

Woodbury, New Jersey


Robert G. Porter Commits Suicide by Shooting Himself in the Head

Washington, D. C., Jan. 12.—Robert G. Porter, a former jeweler of Woodbury, N. J., committed suicide last night at the St. James hotel, in this city, by shooting himself in the head. His deed was not known until to-day, when entrance to his room was forced by a bellboy, and his dead body was discovered on the floor. In his pocket was found a note to Representative Loudenslager, asking that the money in Porter’s possession be used to defray expenses of burying his body at Woodbury. It is believed Mr. Porter’s mind had been affected. He leaves a widow and three children. He sold out his business in Woodbury last Summer, as reported at the time in these columns.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 18th January 1899

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Dec 23, 2019 2:35 pm

GEORGE WESTCOTT McALPINE

Cranston, Rhode Island


DEATHS

George Westcott McAlpine '41 in Cranston, R.I., Dec. 1. Death was by suicide. He was vice-president of the Manchester Silver Co. and manager of E. B. McAlpine Refinery Co., refiners of precious metals, both in Providence. During World War II, Mr. McAlpine served as a lieutenant commander in the U.S. Navy. He was a member of the Jewelers' & Silversmiths' Association. His son is Edward B. McAlpine, II, '73, and his widow is Lola-Jane W. McAlpine, 22 Fort Ave., Cranston.


Source: Brown Alumni Monthly - February 1971

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Jan 07, 2020 5:34 am

ANTHONY LOMBARDO

San Francisco


LEG BROKEN BY STREETCAR

Caught between the running board of a Twenty-fourth street car and a truck, Anthony Lombardo, jeweler's apprentice of 3843 Twenty-fourth street, suffered a fractured leg last night. The accident occurred at Chattanooga street.


Source: The Call - 5th November 1913

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Jan 13, 2020 4:43 am

JOHN LE ROY

Jersey


AN IRON MASK FOR A DRUNKEN WIFE

At the police-court, at Jersey, on Monday, John Le Roy, an elderly man, a watchmaker and greengrocer, carrying on business at Charing Cross, was charged with having cruelly ill-treated his wife by having, among other things, fastened her head in an iron mask, the latter offence having been committed on the Saturday previous. This invention for curing a drunken wife, was produced in court, and excited no little astonishment. It consisted of two stout iron rings of about a quarter of an inch thick, attached to each other by vertical bars of strong hoop-iron, each at least an inch wide. One of the rings was about nine inches in diameter, and the other six inches, the smaller part resting upon the shoulders when the instrument was placed in position. The bars were about two inches apart, and to prevent the wearer getting anything to her mouth a piece of iron was placed across two of the bars in front. It weighed three pounds. It turned out, however, on trial that she was able to defeat this object by reversing the mask during the short time (about an hour) that she had it on and drinking a glass of spirits. The mask opened with a hinge in front, and was fastened behind with a padlock. The wife, who had a half-stupid appearance, said that the prisoner forced the mask over her head while she was in a kneeling posture. She contrived to let some of the neighbours see it on her head, and they sent for the police, who went to the house and compelled the prisoner to take it off. In addition to this and other ill-treatment, the prisoner had sometimes shut her up in a large box, on which he had put iron bars, making it resemble a cage. Beyond the confinement she had suffered no injury, as there was ample room in it. The prisoner, on being asked by the magistrate what he had to say, replied that what he had done was solely for the purpose of curing his wife of her drunken habits. He had tried various means, and had placed her five times in the workhouse. He had locked her up at home, but she escaped by the window in order to get drink. He did not know he was acting illegally by putting the mask on his wife, or he would not have done so. The wife, who admitted the truth of what the prisoner said, expressed herself willing to accept 5s. per week and leave her husband. The latter agreed to this, and was then fined 10s. for the assault on his wife. The mask remains in the possession of the police.


Source: The Western Mail - 4th February 1870

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Jan 14, 2020 4:39 am

ALFRED HOFMEIER

London


The body of Alfred Hofmeier, aged 24, of Moore-park-road, Fulham, who was in business as a watchmaker and jeweller in Oxford-street, London, was found decapitated on the South-Western Railway on Saturday morning.

Source: The Flintshire Observer - 26th August 1909

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Jan 15, 2020 4:46 am

SAMUEL LUBAR

Newark, New Jersey


Samuel Lubar, of 309 Springfield Ave., 62 years old, a retired buttonmaker, was fatally injured last Wednesday night when he walked into the side of a jitney on Market St., near Arlington St. He died of a fractured skull in Newark Memorial Hospital six hours after the accident. Lubar is survived by his widow and three children, Benjamin, David and Elsie.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 6th February 1924

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Jan 16, 2020 4:19 am

WOLF GLOU

Central City, Pennsylvania


John Myma, 27 years old, under sentence of death in the Lackawanna county jail at Scranton, has been transferred to the State prison at Rockview to await electrocution on Feb. 25. Myma is the man who battered Wolf Glou, a jeweler at Central City, Pa., to death several months ago while Glou was defending his store against robbery. The murder was a particularly brutal one and Myma's defense that he killed Glou to prevent the jeweler from killing him had no weight with the jury.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 20th February 1924

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Jan 19, 2020 6:15 am

PRESTON SMITH

Russell County, Kentucky


Preston Smith, a well-known silversmith of Russell county, died suddenly at his home. He and his wife had a quarrel In which several blows were
exchanged and a few moments later he died In her arms.


Source: Semi-Weekly Interior Journal - 27th July 1897

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Jan 20, 2020 4:35 am

FRED KRATZ

Philadelphia


Fred Kratz, a diamond setter associated with Joseph Koch, jeweler in the Deutsch building on Sansom St. and well known to the Philadelphia trade, was killed last week while crossing the street at Ridge Ave. and 13th St., when he was struck by a team and knocked to the pavement. His skull was fractured and he died within a short time.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 2nd April 1924

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Jan 21, 2020 1:23 pm

D.T.. FERGUSON

Kenora, Ontario


D. T. Ferguson, who was in business as a jeweler at Kenora, Ont., for many years until last Winter when he went to the west committed suicide on Saturday, Sept. 2. while traveling on a steamer from Vancouver to Victoria. He shot himself while in his stateroom. His death was much regretted by the citizens of Kenora, where he made many friends. He was a prominent Freemason and much interested in military affairs, being lieutenant-colonel of one local regiment of militia. Mr. Ferguson was town treasurer for some years. Depression on account of serious financial losses is assigned as the cause of his act. Mr. Ferguson leaves a widow and four children.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 20th September 1911

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Jan 31, 2020 5:42 am

JAMES GIBSON

New York


SOUGHT DEATH WITH A RAZOR

Young James Gibson Found by His Brother Bleeding to Death


James Gibson, a silversmith employed in a Broadway shop, near Seventeenth street, lives with his brother Charles. He rooms In a boarding-house at 435 Second avenue.

Charles, who Is the younger, was awakened by groans at 2.30 o'clock this morning. The room was dark and James did not answer when he called. Getting out of bed, be groped his way towards the corner whence the groans came. The floor was slippery and wet with something. Striking a match he saw that it was blood. It dripped from his hands. On the floor lay his brother with his throat cut and his razor beside him.

Horrified, the young man shouted for help. The other boarders summoned the police. James gasped feebly, half dead from the loss of blood. When asked why he had cut himself, he mumbled only. "I did it." and relapsed into death-like stupor. He was removed to Bellevue Hospital a prisoner.

Every effort was made to save his life, but his loss of blood was so great that he died at 9.40 o'clock.


Source: The World - 1st March 1890

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Feb 08, 2020 1:04 pm

DANIEL LUNT CLEAVES

Newark, New Jersey


Truck Kills Daniel L. Cleaves, Yard Superintendent at Newark, N. J., Smelting Plant

Newark, N. J., July 30.—Daniel Lunt Cleaves, 42 years old, yard superintendent at the plant of the Balbach Smelting & Refining Co.. Doremus Ave., was killed July 25 when the runboard of a truck on which he was riding broke in half, throwing him beneath the rear wheel. His head and body were crushed and he died instantly. The accident occurred on the grounds of the Balbach company. Mr. Cleaves had been in the employ of the company about four years.

The truck, owned by the Yeskel Supply Co., of 110 Lillie St., this city, was being driven by Morris Allen, colored, of 283 Rose St. Allen was taken to a police station for questioning.

Funeral services for Mr. Geaves were held Saturday night at his home, 900 S. 16th St., Rev. Joseph F. Folsom, D.D., officiating. Interment took place Monday at Lenox, Mass., with the Masonic ritualistic burial service there.

Mr. Cleaves was born at Kennebunkport, Me., and was a direct descendant of George Cleaves, the first settler in Maine to whom an original grant of land was given in 1634 by the then reigning English king. He also was a descendant of the settlers of the town of Newburyport, Mass. He was a graduate of the University of Maine, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, a member of the D. K. E. fraternity and of the American Institute of Engineers. Mr. Cleaves had traveled extensively and was at one time in charge of various mining operations in the southwest, and later in Missouri. He owned a large farm in Maine but his desire to confine his efforts to mining work kept him away from there.

Surviving him are his wife and daughter.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 6th August 1924

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Feb 16, 2020 4:49 am

HENRY B. ROONEY

Dayton, Kentucky


Henry B. Rooney, 47, an assembler of the Wadsworth Watch Case Co., was killed last Sunday when the motorcycle he was driving crashed head-on into the automobile of William Bauman on a narrow bridge on River Road near Dayton, Ky., across the Ohio river from Cincinnati. Rooney was driving the cycle and side car which contained Andrew Phister and Michael McKeag, both of whom were injured. Motorists pulled the three men from the wreckage and rushed them to Speers hospital but Rooney was beyond medical aid. He had relatives at Arlington and Boston, Mass. He was not married and made his home with J. R. Smith, who lives at 410 Dayton Ave., Dayton, Ky.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 13th August 1924

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Feb 28, 2020 5:12 am

CHARLES GLOVER

Birmingham


TOOK POISON IN THE TRAIN

A gentleman, subsequently identified as Mr. Charles Glover, the son of a Birmingham manufacturing jeweller, was found dead on Monday at Burton-on-Trent railway station, in a second-class compartment of a train from Birmingham. He was sitting upright, and a porter, not perceiving that he was dead, asked him to alight. Under the seat a bottle containing prussic acid was found.


Source: The Record and Advertiser - 27th March 1909

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