Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Feb 17, 2019 5:57 am

CHARLES F. HUNT

Brooklyn, New York


SILVERSMITH HUNT'S SUICIDE

A Brooklyn Man Finally Ends His Melancholy With a Revolver

Charles F. Hunt, aged 61 years, committed suicide last night by shooting himself through the head at his home at 201 Lewis avenue, Brooklyn. He was a silversmith, and was employed at 89 Dey street, this city.

He had been melancholy for some time, but when he got home from work last night he talked cheerfully to the members of his family, and after supper he and his wife arranged to go out and make a call on a friend in the neighborhood. Mr. Hunt went up stairs to change his clothes, while his wife waited for him In the parlor, the five children meanwhile romping around In the parlor.

The report of a pistol up stairs started the household, and, rushing up. Mrs. Hunt found her husband dead on the floor of the bathroom with a bullet hole In the right side of his head and a revolver by his side, Mrs. Hunt can't account for the fatal melancholy from which her husband was suffering, as he had no domestic or business trouble, so far as is known.


Source: The Sun - 9th September 1894

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Feb 18, 2019 4:59 am

C.L. BARBER

Waukegan, Illinois


C. L. Barber, In a Doze, Walks Off the Train

Chicago, Ill, Aug. 20.—C. L. Barber, jeweler, of Waukegan, visited Chicago Wednesday. He left for home on the 11 o’clock train on the Northwestern, and fatigued by a busy day’s work, went to sleep as the train pulled out of the depot. As the train was going through South Evanston he apparently awoke and walked sleepily out on the platform. But Barber was not fully awake. Thinking he had come to his station, he jumped off the train, which was going at the rate of over 25 miles an hour. He was bruised and cut about the head and face, and was unconscious when picked up by passers-by. He was taken to a drug store, where his injuries, which were apparently severe, were dressed. He was able to go to Waukegan on the midnight train.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 25th August 1897

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Feb 19, 2019 5:09 am

A. ROWE

Lower Norwood, London


TWO CHILDREN BURNED TO DEATH

At about two o'clock on Thursday morning the shop and house of six rooms, occupied by Mr. A. Rowe, jeweller, his wife, and two children, at 5, Market-place, Gipsy-road, Lower Norwood, was discovered to be on fire. The inmates were asleep at the time, and the flames spread with such rapidity that all hopes of saving the premises were given up. The parents escaped, the man being slightly burned; but the children, Jessie Mary, aged eleven years and Daisy Kate, aged six, were burned to death. The building was completely destroyed as were also the contents.


Source: The Weekly Mail - 12th January 1884

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Feb 21, 2019 6:03 am

GOERING

Islington, London


SUICIDE AT SIXTEEN

At Islington on Tuesday night Dr. Westcott held an inquest touching the death of Margaret Elisa Goering, aged sixteen, a restaurant waitress, lately residing at 41, Morton-road, New North-road. The evidence showed that the father of the girl, a working silversmith, was deserted by his wife when his daughter was only fourteen months old, and since then his mother had been his housekeeper. On Sunday night after her return from church the girl and her grandmother had a slight quarrel about preparing Mr. Goering's breakfast before he went to work the next mornlng. Mr. Goering said he would not listen to their quarrel, and went out. On returning shortly afterwards he found that his daughter had taken some cyanide of potassium, which he had bought to kill a cat, and that she was lying dead in her bedroom. Ultimately the jury found that the girl committed suicide in a moment of temporary insanity.


Source: Western Mail - 12th November 1891

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Feb 22, 2019 5:21 am

M. MORGANSTERN

Pittsburgh


Major Miller, who was run down by M. Morganstern, jeweler, who was scorching on his wheel, died last week from injuries received. Mr. Morganstern gave $1,000 bail for court. Both men are prominent citizens, and the accident is much deplored.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 31st March 1897

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Feb 27, 2019 4:17 am

HARRY W. BELL

Baltimore


BALTIMORE, MD., July 22d, 1917 - Struck by a west-bound Gilmor Street trolley car as he stepped from behind an east-bound street trolley car at Fayette and Pearl Streets, at about 7:30 o'clock last Thursday evening (July 19th), Mr. Harry W. Bell, of 2716 Evergreen Terrace, opposite Druid Hill Park, received injuries which caused his death in a few minutes.

It is said that Mr. Bell walked directly from behind the east-bound car, and started across the west-bound tracks just as the Gilmor Street car approached. The motorman applied his brakes, but it was too late. Mr. Bell was dragged beneath the car, his skull fractured, and the body horribly bruised. The automobile belonging to Mrs. Whitney, who lived a few doors from the scene of the accident, was commandeered by the police, and rushed him to the Franklin Square Hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

Mr. Bell is survived by his aged father, William E Bell, who is stationed at the Navy Yard, Washington, D. C., and bis brother, Mr. William E. Bell, Jr. of Howard Park.

Mr. Bell was an expert silversmith in the employ of the Stieff Silver Company, where he worked since he was a boy.

Mr. Bell was a graduate of the old Knapp's Institute for the Oral Instruction of the Deaf. His tragic death caused a profound sorrow among his wide circle of friends, as he was of a perpetually jovial nature, and had an inexhaustible fund of snappy stories and crackling jokes.

In the absence of Rev. A. D. Bryant, who is spending his vacation at his summer home at Indian Neck, Ct , the funeral services were conducted by Rev Dr. Bartlett A. Bowers, Pastor of the First Baptist Church, Lafayette and Fremont Avenues, at the home of Mrs G. W. Rodenhiser, where Mr. Bell boarded for the past fifteen years. Dr. Bowers preached an eloquent and and touching eulogy, which brought many to tears. Mr. Bell was a member of the department for the deaf connected with this church. The funeral was largely attended by the deaf community, as well as many hearing friends. Numerous beautiful floral tribute were in profusion.

The members of the Eutaw Conclave, No. 27, Jr O. U. A M., of which Mr. Bell was for many years a member, acted as active pallbearers, while the honorary pallbearers, all from the Baptist Mission, were Messrs. Harry Henning, George W. Graff, John W. Hildebrand, William Hokemeyer, W. W. Duvall, Jr., and Alfred K. Feast.

Mr. Bell was laid to rest In the beautiful and reposeful Loudon Park Cemetery on Frederick Road. The Eutaw Conclave had charge of the burial ceremony at the grave, according to the rites of this order. Lastly, Rev. Dr. Bowers pronounced a prayer.


Source: Deaf-Mutes' Journal - 2nd August 1917

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Feb 28, 2019 4:32 am

HAROLD G. FOX

London


POISONING FATALITIES

Cyanide of Potassium - Harold G. Fox, a London silversmith, committed suicide with this chemical while temporarily insane.


Source: The Chemist and Druggist - 13th June 1914

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Mar 02, 2019 7:22 am

JOHN W. STEPHENS Jnr.

Barnesville, Ohio


John W. Stephens. Jr., a silversmith of Barnesville, attempted to commit suicide, on Tuesday evening, by taking morphine. He purchased fourteen grains of the drug, and there was less than a grain left. After swallowing it he bade farewell to a number of friends, saying he was tired of life. Medical attendance was immediately called and antidotes administered before the poison fastened upon his system. No definite cause is assigned for the act. Mr. Stephens has hitherto borne a good character enjoying the esteem of all the people, and his strange act was a great astonishment to his friends. Barnesville is becoming notorious for such attempts.

Source: Belmont Chronicle - 31st January 1878

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Mar 05, 2019 6:12 am

FOUNTAIN

London


On Monday night week, Mr Fountain, a jeweller, went into the parlour of the Albemarle's Head, Albemarle street, Clerkenwell, in which many gentlemen were siting, and called for a glass of brandy and water. While drinking it, he drew a pistol from his pocket, and laid it by the side of his glass. A Gentleman present remonstrated with him on the impropriety of displaying such a weapon in company. Mr Fountain took up the pistol, and pointing it at the Gentleman, he said, "There, what harm can this little thing do any one?'" The Gentleman put the pistol aside with his hand, saying he did not like such jocularity, and that perhaps it might be loaded. Mr Fountain replied, " It is, and you shall see how soon it can rid a man of his cares." He then put the muzzle of the pistol into his mouth, and fired it. The discharge tore the tongue to pieces, and destroyed the roof of the mouth. He was conveyed to Bartholomew's Hospital, where his death is hourly expected.

Source: The Waterford Mail - 7th January 1824

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Mar 11, 2019 6:05 am

CLEMENT B. BISHOP

New York and Philadelphia


In the recent railroad accident near Philadelphia, Mr. C.B. Bishop, of the firm Carrow, Bishop & Co. was seriously injured.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - May 1883

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Mar 12, 2019 4:30 am

JAMES HEYWOOD

Stockport, Manchester


Sad Railway Accident

Mr. James Heywood, jeweller, Stockport, and his wife attempted to enter the train while in motion on Monday night at Hyde, and were thrown on to the platform. Mrs. Heywood was killed almost Instantly, and Mr. Heywood was seriously injured.


Source: Western Mail - 14th June 1893

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Mar 18, 2019 7:03 am

BENJAMIN J. ANGELL

Attleboro, Massachusetts


Mr. B. J. Angell, of the firm, Horton, Angell & Co. of Attleboro, was thrown from his buggy on the 13th ult., receiving a fracture of the skull, from which he soon after died. He was a popular and highly respected gentleman, and a successful manufacturer. He was 55 years of age and leaves a wife and one daughter.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - November 1886

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Mar 20, 2019 3:16 pm

ALFRED BURLINGHAM

King's Lynn, Norfolk


The adjourned inquest on the body of Alfred Burlingham, jeweller, aged 32, was resumed at King's Lynn on Wednesday night. Burlingham was killed on the 9th inst. whilst experimenting with acelylene gas. Col. Ford, Chief Inspector under the Explosives Act, and Mr Henry Sutcliffe, principal of the Safety Acetylene Gas Generator Company, Halifax, were present. The latter said he supplied the apparatus used to Burlingham without the instructions. This was customary as sometimes in transit by rail portions of machinery were broken, and trying it under these circumstances was likely to lead to serious consequences. Instructions were forwarded immediately upon receipt of information from customers that the apparatus had arrived safely. Col. Ford said that without desiring to prejudice anyone he thought perhaps Burlingham tried the machinery and did not know sufficiently how it worked. A verdict of "Death by misadventure" was returned.

Source: South Wales Daily News - 22nd December 1898

See: viewtopic.php?f=38&t=40531&p=155405&hilit=burlingham#p155405

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Apr 06, 2019 5:29 am

TRAGEDY NEAR JAMES DEAKIN & SONS

Sheffield


SUPPOSED MURDER AND SUICIDE IN SHEFFIELD

A mournful occurrence has been brought to light in Sheffield. A young man named William Kirk, whilst walking along Matilda Street, had his attention attracted to the body of a woman, which was lying in the little brooklet that crosses Matilda Street between the works of Messrs. James Deakin and Sons, silversmiths and table-cutlery manufacturers, and the timber yard of Messrs. J. Smith and Sons. The woman had a little boy in her arms, and he at once proceeded to get the two out of the water. Tho woman and child were taken from the water and laid on the bank. Kirk tried every means in his power to resuscitate the woman, but his efforts were of no avail, as life was extinct. Police-constable Holliwell and other constables then came to the spot, and under their directions the bodies were removed to the Mortuary. The woman was dressed in a dark brown dress and a grey bodice trimmed with velvet. She was about forty years of age, and 5ft. 2in. or 5ft. 3in. in height. The boy appeared to be about two or three years of age, with light hair and blue eyes. A woman who lives in the neighbourhood of Matilda Street said she saw the deceased woman in Matilda Street about a quarter-past ten o'clock the other night, and she was then enquiring after lodgings for herself and child. The police are now making enquires into the matter.


Source: The Glamorgan Gazette - 4th January 1895

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Apr 07, 2019 4:18 am

JAMES FENTON

Sheffield


An engine-driver named James Fenton met with a horrible death at a cutlery works, at Sheffield, on Sunday. As he was leaning over the engine his shirt was caught by the crank pin. and hIs head was dragged into the machinery and crushed to pieces.

Source: Cardiff Times and South Wales Weekly News - 19th March 1892

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Apr 13, 2019 5:36 am

ORLANDO DUNN

Wallingford, Connecticut


Orlando Dunn, in the employ of the R. Wallace & Sons Mfg. Co., Wallingford, while working near an open fire in the forging room, on Monday of last week, sustained painful burns about the hands and arms by a spark which blew up and set fire to his clothing.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 4th March 1908

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Apr 20, 2019 12:40 pm

CLARENCE P. ELLIOT

Plainville, Massachusetts


LEAPED BEFORE TRAIN, IS INSTANTLY KILLED

Jewelry Manufacturer Commits Suicide Near Sanitarium Where He Went to Seek Health


Clarence P. Elliot of the firm of Maintein Bros. & Elliott, jewelry manufacturers, No. 9 Maiden Lane, committed suicide yesterday at the Roth Health resort, Brentwood, L.I., by throwing himself in front of an eastbound Long Island Railroad train. Death was instantaneous. Mr. Elliott went to the sanitarium on Saturday. For several months past he has been suffering from melancholia and was subject to extreme nervous attacks. His partners advised that he leave the city for a rest, and reluctantly he consented to go to Brentwood.

Yesterday the jeweler spent several hours on the sanitarium lawn, but about noon one of the attendants saw him walk toward the railroad track, not far from the building, and apparently step onto the tracks as the train drew near. The body was taken to the Elliot home, No. 159 South Oxford street, Brooklyn. Mr. Elliot Is survived by his wife and two daughters.

For more than fifteen years Mr. Elliot had been a member of the firm, he recently returned from Plainvllle, Mass., where the factory Is located, and for a time seemed to be In better spirits. He was fifty years old and was born in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia.


Source: The Evening World - 15th July 1912

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Apr 21, 2019 11:02 am

F.C. STEINMAN

New York


Hacked Throat With Penknife and Died In Few Minutes

Chicago, Ills., Dec. 11. F. C. Steinman said to be at the head of the New York jewelry firm of F. C. Steinman & Co., committed suicide here today by cutting his throat In the office of the National Stamping company, 118 Michigan st. He had just finished a talk with Manager Kolpase, and started to leave when he drew a pen knife from his pocket and hacked away at his throat. Several persons endeavored lo Interfere but too late to prevent him Inflicting wounds from which he died In a few minutes. Steinman was 38 years of age and represented his firm on the road. He had just come from Duluth.


Source: Akron Daily Democrat - 12th December 1901

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Apr 23, 2019 4:22 am

LOUIS A. KIEFER

Indianapolis, Indiana


A Spring Gun Intended for Burglars Works Mischief

Indianapolis, Ind., April 18.—Louis A. Kiefer thinks that he owes his life to a tobacco pouch carried in his trousers pocket ; as it was he was badly wounded by the accidental discharge of a spring gun, and it was necessary to remove him to his home in a carriage. For some time L. F. Kiefer
& Son have known that burglars have been trying to effect an entrance through the rear door of their jewelry store, 95 N. Delaware St., and fearing that one of the oft repeated attempts might prove successful, they arranged a spring gun which would be discharged the moment any one entered the rear window after business hours.

Louis F. Kiefer, the junior member of the firm, opened the store about 7.30 o’clock yesterday morning. In some way his coat caught on a wire that connected the shot gun with the rear door and instantly the gun was fired and the load of shot lodged in Kiefer’s side. A number of people gathered at the sound of the shot and found that although Kiefer was suffering from the effects of the shot, he was not dangerously wounded. His life had no doubt been saved by a tobacco pouch which he carried in his pocket and which received most of the shot.

The same gun had been accidentally discharged a few days before, and narrowly missed one of the clerks.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 24th April 1895

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Apr 24, 2019 10:03 am

CHRISTOPHER ROCCHICCIOTE

San Francisco


A Sorry Attempt to Make Business Better

San Francisco. Nov. 12. Christopher Rocchicciote, silversmith, was found this morning sitting in a chair in his place of business, No. 8 Tyler street, with a bullet through his head and a pistol still grasped in his hand. He has lately been despondent over the dullness of business.


Source: The Douglas independent - 20th November 1880

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