The Canadian Trade, Information, Advertisements, Etc.

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Re: The Canadian Trade, Information, Advertisements, Etc.

Postby dognose » Sat Apr 27, 2013 3:12 am

CHARLES ELKINGTON

88, St. Constant Street, later, 552, Craig Street, Montreal

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Charles Elkington - Montreal - 1868

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Charles Elkington - Montreal - 1869

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Re: The Canadian Trade, Information, Advertisements, Etc.

Postby dognose » Sun Apr 28, 2013 8:08 am

E.H. ALLPORT & Co.

50, later, 58, Church Street, Toronto

E. H. Allport & Co., Manufacturing Jewellers, 50 Church Street. –Among the newer established industries in Toronto may be mentioned the firm of E. H. Allport & Co. , who are located at No. 50 Church Street. The firm are manufacturing jewellery in gold and silver, making almost everything in the jewellery line, broaches, scarf pins, earrings, chains, etc., a specialty being made of signet and diamond rings. The work executed by the firm is artistic and finished in the most skilled and workmanlike manner, which makes their goods very saleable in the market. They already give employment on an average to 20 competent workmen. The premises occupied are 125 x 145 feet in dimensions. The firm consists of Mr. E. H. Allport, who was born in England and came to Canada nine years ago. Mr. C. Pearsall, the junior member of the firm, was born in Canada. Both gentlemen are thorough business and practical workmen, and have placed themselves in the foremost rank by their own ability.

Source: Industries of Canada : Historical and Commercial Sketches of Toronto and Environs - 1886



E.H. ALLPORT & CO., Manufacturing Jewellers, 58 Church Street. -Prominent among the representative houses in the trade is that of Messrs. E. H. Allport & Co., wholesale and manufacturing jewellers, engravers and diamond setters, who are located at 38 Church Street. This business was established in 1886 by Messrs. E H Allport and C. Pearsall, both of whom are thoroughly practical, expert jewellers. They occupy two spacious floors 125 x 145 feet in area. The manufacturing departments are fully equipped with modern appliances and furnish employment to from 25 to 30 workmen. Messrs. E. H Allport & Co. manufacture all kinds of gold and silver jewellery brooches, scarf pins, earrings, chains, and make a specialty of signet and diamond rings. Their goods are unrivalled for elegance, quality and finish. They also attend to jobbing work, gilding and silver-plating and warrant all their goods to be exactly as represented. The firm employ several travelling salesmen, and their trade extends throughout all sections of Ontario, Quebec and Manitoba. Mr. Allport was born in Birmingham, England, but has resided in Toronto for the past thirteen years Mr. Pearsall is a native Torontonian. Both are highly regarded in trade circles for their integrity and ability, and merit the abundant success secured in this important industry.

Source: Illustrated Toronto - The Queen City of Canada - Its Past Present and Future - 1890



H. Hughes, a jeweler in ihe employ of E. H. Allport & Co. of this city. had his hand severely crushed last month while working a power press.

Source: The Trader & Canadian Jeweller - September 1890

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Re: The Canadian Trade, Information, Advertisements, Etc.

Postby dognose » Mon Apr 29, 2013 4:41 am

P.T. WARE & Co.

Ontario Block, King Street, Hamilton, and Dundas Street, London

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P.T. Ware & Co. - Hamilton and London - 1851

The accounts for the year ending 31st December 1852 of the Grand Division of Sons of Temperance of Canada East reveal a payment to P. T. Ware & Co. of Hamilton, for the supply of regalia, to the amount of £18-00-00.

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Re: The Canadian Trade, Information, Advertisements, Etc.

Postby dognose » Tue Apr 30, 2013 7:41 am

THE ACME SILVER COMPANY

9-11, Church Street, Toronto

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The Acme Silver Company - Toronto - 1885

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The Acme Silver Company - Toronto - 1885

The Acme Silver Co. - Manufacturers of the Finest Quality of Electro-Plated Ware, 9 and 11 Church Street. –In few industries has there been a more rapid increase in a short time than in that of electro-plated ware. Not only has the industry more than doubled itself in the last decade, but the scientific mechanical experience brought to bear on its productions has advanced in an equal ratio with the enterprise itself, till now at the present time first-class electro ware, in appearance as well as durability, is equal to the best silver. The great field opened up in this important branch seems to have centred in Toronto, and amongst the leading houses in this line the Acme Silver Company must be given a prominent place. Though but a young company, having been established in 1884, this house, by its liberal policy and enterprise, and sterling qualities of its manufactures, has steadily pushed its way into the front rank, and continues to do an ever and fast increasing trade, enjoying a widely extended and influential patronage. The works and offices of the company are located at 9 and 11 Church Street, and consist of a large four-story building 48 x 120 feet in dimensions, where some 50 hands are employed, all experts at the trade, the pay roll amounting to some $2,000 per month. The manufactory is fully equipped with all the latest improved machinery and appliances known to the prosecution of this industry, amounting in value to $26,000. The energy, capital and knowledge of the business have thoroughly established this house as an important feature in the commercial interests of the city. The firm had an exhibit at the Indian and Colonial Exhibition in London, a full line of goods of their manufacture, and they have the honor of taking the gold medal and four diplomas over competitors from India, Australia and the sister colonies.

Source: Industries of Canada : Historical and Commercial Sketches of Toronto and Environs - 1886

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The Acme Silver Co'y - Toronto - 1885

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The Acme Silver Company - Toronto - 1885

The Acme Silver Company was liquidated on the 2nd May 1893. It was acquired by W.K. George and his associates who then formed the Standard Silver Co., Toronto Ltd.

The mark used by The Acme Silver Company:
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Re: The Canadian Trade, Information, Advertisements, Etc.

Postby dognose » Wed May 01, 2013 7:38 am

MILLER & BREMNER

33½ and 35, Bleury Street, Montreal

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Miller & Bremner - Montreal - 1891

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Miller & Bremner - Montreal - 1887

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Miller & Bremner - Montreal - 1891

Thought to have been absorbed into Henry Birks & Sons.

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Re: The Canadian Trade, Information, Advertisements, Etc.

Postby dognose » Thu May 02, 2013 12:25 pm

E.C. MELLOR

285, Notre Dame Street, Montreal

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E.C. Mellor - Montreal - 1875

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Re: The Canadian Trade, Information, Advertisements, Etc.

Postby dognose » Sat May 04, 2013 8:01 am

A.H. WELCH

31, Adelaide Street West, Toronto

A.H. Welch - Diamond Merchant and Fine Jewellery Manufacturer, 31 Adelaide Street West.– Since the most ancient of days workers in silver and gold have held a very prominent place in the industries of a country, and is an evidence of the prosperity of the community in which they exist. It is with pleasure, therefore, that we mention the leading ones in this city, among whom is Mr. A. H. Welch, whose establishment is located at 31 Adelaide Street West. The premises are well adapted for the work done, and the very latest improved machinery is used, including dies for lockets, whereby the seams are turned in and no outside jointure is observed, Mr. Welch has a wide-spread reputation as a designer and engraver, especially in medals, for which he has taken bronze medals and five first prizes at the Toronto exhibition, and also a first prize for best settings in diamond rings, for necklaces and lockets, and a diploma for gold and silver plating. As convincing proof of his excellence of design and work, the judges for a fair in Scotland selected one made by him out of twenty-two competitors, the medal being intended as a prize for best butter. The trowel used in laying the corner stone of the Home for Incurables and designed by Mr. Welch, was presented to the Princess Louise, who now has it among her Canadian souvenirs in England. This gentleman started in business alone, in a small room on King Street, where, by the excellence of his workmanship, energy and enterprise, he soon secured an extensive custom, and finding that he required more commodious quarters, removed his establish ment to 36 Adelaide Street West, where he took a partner with him. Immediately after the Toronto exhibition burglars entered his house, and taking the keys opened the safe at the office, stealing therefrom $5,000 worth of jewellery and precious stones. No trace of the robbers or their booty was ever discovered. The establishment was removed to Yonge Street, and after six years the partnership was dissolved, Mr. Welch continuing the business alone, again on Adelaide Street, this time on the south side, at No. 31 West, where he prosecutes that branch of the business most adapted to his tastes, namely, manufacturing, and now enjoys a large share of the best patronage of the city, which is steadily increasing. He employs about 15 hands, and in regard to the completeness of its appointments, and is one of the largest in the Dominion. Mr, Welch is a member and official of the Parkdale Methodist Church, and is also ' the founder and superintendent of the Sunday-school in connection therewith. He is native of Hamilton, and is a representative Canadian, and highly esteemed in Masonic circles and by the general community, and is also Grand Trustee of the Canada Order of Oddfellows Widows' and Orphans' Fund. He also alloys and melts all his own gold on the premises, and is a well known expert in this important department.

Source: Industries of Canada : Historical and Commercial Sketches of Toronto and Environs - 1886

See above post for E. M. Trowern, the former partner of A.H. Welch.

Reward notice regarding the burglary that occurred at the premises of Welch & Trowern on the 16th/17th September 1871 mentioned above:

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Welch & Trowern - Toronto - 1882

Note: In the above advertisement it states that their wares were marked 'W&T'.


Fire.–The jewelry establishment of A. H. Welch, 31 Adelaide street west. Toronto, was damaged to the extent of $25 by fire at midnight on the night of the 26th March. Luckily for Mr. Welsh the fire, which was immediately above the furnace, was discovered before it had time to become dangerous to the building.

Source: The Trader and Canadian Jeweller - April 1890

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Re: The Canadian Trade, Information, Advertisements, Etc.

Postby dognose » Sun May 05, 2013 5:54 am

JOHN T. STEMSHORN

141, Hollis Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia

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John T. Stemshorn - Halifax, N.S. - 1882

John Theodore Stemshorn was born on the 10th December 1857 at Schleswig Holstein. He was the son of Henry George Stemshorn (b. 25-5-1834, Germany-d. 31-5-1905 Halifax, NS) and Caroline Stemshorn (b. 17-3-1835, d. 29-4-1902, Halifax N.S.)

John Theodore Stemshorn was married to Sarah Jane Tompkins (b.2-9-1865, Listowel, ON, d. 9-4-1924, Regina, Saskatchewan)

John Theodore Stemshorn died on the 16th December 1934 at Regina, Saskatchewan.

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Re: The Canadian Trade, Information, Advertisements, Etc.

Postby dognose » Mon May 06, 2013 8:31 am

CHARLES WARD

223, Queen Street East, Toronto

C. Ward, Manufacturing Jeweller, 223 Queen St. East.–Mr. Charles Ward, who is a native of New York City, commenced business in Toronto in 1856, having come here in 1841. Diamonds, rings, masonic and other emblems are made to order, likewise medals of all descriptions, while electro-plating, chasing, engraving, etc., form part of this comprehensive business ; repairing of all kinds is done on the premises, and every satisfaction is invariably given.

Source: Industries of Canada : Historical and Commercial Sketches of Toronto and Environs - 1886

Not to be confused with the business of George Ward, 103 Church Street, Toronto (see above post).

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Re: The Canadian Trade, Information, Advertisements, Etc.

Postby dognose » Tue May 07, 2013 5:05 am

MONTREAL OPTICAL & JEWELLERY COMPANY

1685, Notre Dame Street, Montreal

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Montreal Optical & Jewellery Company - Montreal - 1884

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Re: The Canadian Trade, Information, Advertisements, Etc.

Postby dognose » Wed May 08, 2013 4:02 am

THE STANDARD SILVER Co.Ltd

31-43, Hayter Street, Toronto

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Standard Silver Co. - Toronto - 1896

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Standard Silver Co. - Toronto - 1900

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Standard Silver Co. - Toronto - 1901

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Standard Silver Co. - Toronto - 1908

The Standard Silver Co. of Toronto was the continuation of the Acme Silver Co. (see above post). The business was acquired in 1893 by W.K. George and others, it was amalgamated with the International Silver Co. of Canada Ltd. in around 1912. The plant was closed in 1931.

The Standard Silver Co. manufactured 'inlaid silver flatware' under licence from Holmes & Edwards.

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The Standard Silver Plate Company have built a new modern factory with the latest improvements and have one of the most complete factories in Canada. They employ about three hundred hands and are connected with the International Silver Company of Meriden, Conn.

Source: The Metal Industry - July 1914

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Re: The Canadian Trade, Information, Advertisements, Etc.

Postby dognose » Thu May 09, 2013 6:20 am

HERMAN J.A. VOGEL

245, Barrington Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia

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Herman J.A. Vogel - Halifax, N.S. - 1879

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Re: The Canadian Trade, Information, Advertisements, Etc.

Postby silverly » Thu May 09, 2013 11:46 am

Herman Julius A Vogel was born in Prussia in about 1846. He is listed in Halifax directories as a jeweller and watchmaker from at least 1869 to 1887 and may have continued in the business beyond that year. In 1889 he is listed in Halifax as a sewing machine agent.

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Re: The Canadian Trade, Information, Advertisements, Etc.

Postby dognose » Fri May 10, 2013 5:44 am

AMERICAN WATCH CASE COMPANY

67, Adelaide Street West, later, 511-513 King Street West, Toronto

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American Watch Case Co. - Toronto - 1890

Reliable Filled Cases. –The new " Fortune " 10k filled gold case placed on the Canadian market by the American Watch Case Co., of Toronto, has proved itself somewhat more popular than that Company expected, that they have only with the utmost difficulty been enabled to keep pace with the demand. The "Fortune" contains over one dollars worth more of gold than any similar American watch case imported into Canada, and while it will no doubt wear for fully double the length of time that its snide competitors will, it is sold to the trade at fully ten per cent less in price. This supplying of reliable Canadian gold filled watch cases to the jewelry trade of this country, instead of snide goods from some of the unscrupulous makers of the United States, is one of the bad wicked things that that terrible N. P. has done to this wooden country, but if it never does anything worse than to put money as well as reliable cases in their pockets, our people will think a good many times before they go in for either Free Trade or Commercial Union, and well they may.

Source: The Trader & Canadian Jeweller - April 1890

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American Watch Case Co. - Toronto - 1890

Cheaper Watches.–The surprise of the past month has been the reduction by the American Watch Case Company, of Toronto, of their "Nevada" silver screw case, and also their "Fortune" gold-filled screw-case of the same pattern. These reductions, following as they do directly upon the heels of an increase of ten per cent, in the duty, should certainly convince the trade that an increased duty does not necessarily mean an increase in price to the people of this country. As a matter of fact. the staple lines of watch cases are to-day sold cheaper in Canada than they are in the United States and this in spite of the fact that our home manufacturers have to pay the Government an average of at least ten cents of duty upon the imported material used in and for the manufacture of every case they make. The truth is that our protective policy has so stimulated manufacture in this line that we have too many factories for the limited market they have to supply. The result of this over-competition is cheaper goods than have ever been seen in this country before, and the consumer reaps an advantage corresponding with that lost by the manufacturer.

Source: The Trader & Canadian Jeweller - May 1890

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American Watch Case Co. - Toronto - 1890


The American Watch Case Co., Toronto have moved into new and magnificent premises at 511 and 513 King St. W., Toronto. The building is four stories high and was specially built for the requirements of the company. It is a fireproof structure and complete in every respect.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 23rd August 1893


The American Watch Case Co.. Toronto, have again elected John N. Lake president.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 2nd February 1898


The American Watch Case Co., Toronto, have registered a judgment for $2,141 against the wholesale jewelry firm of A. C. Anderson & Co.. formerly of Toronto, who went out of business some two years ago. effecting a compromise with their creditors. A. C. Anderson went to the Klondike, but returned on account of ill health, and has since recuperated. It is claimed by the plaintiffs that he misapplied or retained money which should have gone to the payment of the firm's debts.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 20th September 1899


Andrew J. Glick, a foreman of the American Watch Case Co., Toronto, aged 53 years, was found in a dying condition in a boat house. He had been overcome by uremic poisoning, and had been unconscious for many hours. He died shortly afterwards. He came to Toronto from Newport, Ky., about 30 years ago.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 26th September 1917

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Postby dognose » Sat May 11, 2013 11:20 am

CHARLES A. FOX

Main Street, Galt, Ontario

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Charles A. Fox - Galt - 1869

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Postby dognose » Sun May 12, 2013 12:45 pm

THE TORONTO TROPHY CRAFT COMPANY

1710, later, 1711-1712, Royal Bank Building, Toronto

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The Toronto Trophy Craft Co. - Toronto - 1915

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The Toronto Trophy Craft Co. - Toronto - 1918

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The Toronto Trophy Craft Co. - Toronto - 1920

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The Toronto Trophy Craft Co. - Toronto - 1920

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The Toronto Trophy Craft Co. - Toronto - 1922

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Re: The Canadian Trade, Information, Advertisements, Etc.

Postby dognose » Tue May 14, 2013 11:01 am

W.F. DOLL

433, and 435, Main Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba

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W.F. Doll - Winnipeg - 1890



W. F. DOLL

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The subject of this sketch. Mr. W. F. Doll, of the City of Winnipeg, Manitoba, is not only one of the youngest, but one of the most enterprising wholesale jewelers in the Dominion of Canada, having been born in the City of Stutgardt, Germany, on February 10th, 1859. His father, Wm. Doll, was a son of Frank Doll, a well-known watch case manufacturer of that city, and a brother of Frank Doll, jr., of Cincinnati, Ohio, known throughout the United States as the first manufacturer of watch cases west of New York City. Mr. W. F. Doll's father was a practical watchmaker and a thorough master of his trade, who finding the old Fatherland too cramped for the proper exercise of his energies, emigrated to America, and after looking around for a suitable place for the pursuit of his calling decided upon the City of Toronto, in which place he located in 1864, where he was joined by his family about a year later. Soon after this Mr. Doll, sr, decided to remove to Prince Albert –then a rising town, but since amalgamated with Port Perry and commence business there on his own account. The venture proved a success, and though Mr Doll has long since " gone to join the majority," the old business is still continued by Mrs. Doll, who subsequently married Mr. John Diesfield the well-known jeweler of that place. It was at Port Perry that W. F. Doll passed his boyhood, and received a good common school education At the age of 14 he was placed at the bench in order to learn the intricacies of watchmaking, and there he put in three years of honest conscientious work, during which he thoroughly mastered his business. In the summer of 1876, at the age of 17, he determined to leave home and strike out for himself. After a fruitless search for employment, he finally stranded at Shelbourne, then a new town on the Toronto Cray & Bruce Railway, with just fifteen cents in his pocket. Not being able to buy a regular meal with the remnant of his fortune, he called up his nerve, jingled his fifteen cents in his pocket and engaged the best room in the hotel with board for two weeks. Next day he rented bench room in a boot and shoe store near the hotel for $3 a month, and at once commenctd to take in all the work he could get in the way of cleaning and repairing watches, clocks, jewelry, etc. At the end of two months he had earned enough money to pay all expenses, and have about $10 to the good, but being tired of the town he pulled up stakes and shifted his quarters to Flesherton, a small town a few miles further north on the same line of railway, in which place he landed on the 7th February, 1877, with a net capital of $7 in hard cash. Here he was fortunate in at once winning the friendship of Mr. M. Richardson, a general merchant of that town, who not only took a fatherly interest in the young lad, but invited him to make his house his home, a kindness that helped him materially and that has never been forgotten by the recipient. Business prospered so much with Mr. Doll that he soon after decided to open branch stores in the surrounding villages under competent management, as rapidly as his capital would justify the investment. By the year 1882, in addition to his fine store and stock in Flesherton, he had branches operating in Dundalk, Markdale, and Chatsworth. During this year he conceived the idea of importing his own goods direct from the European markets, and for this purpose he crossed the ocean and effected all the necessary arrangements. While in Europe he decided that on his return home he would sell out all of his retail stores and devote himself exclusively to the wholesale jewelry business. The Spring of 1883 found him located in Toronto in a small room over the American Express Company's office on Yonge Street. From this place as his headquarters he travelled on his own account all over the northern part of Ontario, and succeeded in building up a very snug little business and making considerable money for himself. In January of 1886, after fully investigating the prospects for trade in the North-west, he decided to settle down in the young and pushing City of Winnipeg, Manitoba, feeling satisfied in his own mind that it was destined in the near future to become not only the political and commercial metropolis of its own province, but one of the largest and most prosperous cities on the North American Continent. His first location was at 525 Main Street, where he had commodious offices on the second floor. As his business enlarged from year to year, he soon found these premises too small for him, and therefore on February of the present year decided on purchasing the magnificent warehouse, 433 and 435 Main Street, which he now occupies, and of which we show an illustration in this article.

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Mr. Doll carries a large and varied stock of watches, diamonds, clocks, English and American solid gold and rolled plate jewelry, fire gilt and gilt jewelry, electro-plated flat and hollow ware, optical goods, watch material of all kinds ; in fact he carries almost everything demanded by the trade. He also does watch repairing for the trade and employs quite a staff of experienced workmen in this department. Soon after Mr. Doll removed to Winnipeg, he married Miss Flattie Higginbotham, only daughter of Mr. John Higginbotham, of Bowmanville, Ontario. Their recently purchased private residence is one of the handsomest and most complete in Winnipeg In addition to his warehouse and private residence in Winnipeg, Mr. Doll has made extensive purchases of farm lands throughout Manitoba, being thoroughly satisfied that it will only be a few years before that province will be universally known as the "gilt-edged province of the Dominion," and the granary of the World. Mr. Doll is a gentleman of unbounded energy, and has the utmost confidence in his own judgment and resources. That this confidence has not been misplaced is evidenced from the success which has attended his business career. He is of a very independent disposition, and it is his boast that during the fourteen years he has been engaged in business on his own account, he has never had financial assistance from any one to the extent of a single dollar. In New York, Mr. Doll is known as the " Polar Bear Jobber," on account of his place of business being located nearer the North Pole than any other wholesale jeweler in America. He is a keen, shrewd, buyer, who does not hesitate about the size of the lines he purchases provided there is " snap " enough in the transaction to make it interesting for him. From the foregoing sketch of his career, it will be readily seen that Mr. Doll has more than the ordinary amount of perseverance and ability, and that his success is not the result of chance, but of a steadfast determination to overcome every obstacle and reach the goal of his youthful ambition. That he has single-handed, and under such disadvantageous circumstances, succeeded in becoming one of the most prosperous of our Canadian wholesale jewelers is greatly to his credit, and furnishes an example for others in the craft which may be studied with profit.


Source: The Trader and Canadian Jeweler - December 1890

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W.F. Doll - Winnipeg - 1890

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Re: The Canadian Trade, Information, Advertisements, Etc.

Postby dognose » Wed May 15, 2013 5:59 am

S.J. SARGANT

Toronto

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S.J. Sargant - Toronto - 1880

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Re: The Canadian Trade, Information, Advertisements, Etc.

Postby dognose » Wed May 15, 2013 8:55 am

WILLIAM MAURICE CARMICHAEL

Victoria and Vancouver

William Maurice Carmichael was born at Victoria, British Columbia, the son of Herbert Carmichael, an engineer who was later to become the Provincial Assayer for the Department of Mines of British Columbia. William originally followed in his father's footsteps and initially trained as a civil engineer, however, it would appear that that he inherited an artistic flare from his mother, a former student of the Slade School of Fine Art, and in that direction was the path he was to follow. Following his service in the First World War he returned to British Columbia and opened his first workshop in part of his parent's house in St. Denis Street in the Oak Bay district of Victoria. Here he successfully designed and manufactured jewellery and silverplated wares and his enterprise grew rapidly and work in sterling silver was soon added to his range of products. In 1924 he acquired the services of the silversmith George Bennett, who had received his training in Sheffield, England. Carmichael opened a showroom in Victoria, and in 1927 a manufactory at Government Street. The expansion continued with the construction of a splendid Mock Tudor establishment located at Fort Street, Victoria in 1929. During the period 1935 to 1940 a branch was maintained at Howe Street, Vancouver, but this was closed down when the firm converted their output to supplying the needs for the war effort. Following the end of hostilities Carmichael returned to producing his pre-war wares, but he died in 1954, and although the business was continued for a while in the control of his second wife, the firm closed soon afterwards.

William Maurice Carmichael was noted as the maker of the mace for the cruiser H.M.C.S. Ontario and the Thunderbird & Whale bowl that was presented to King George V by the Government of British Columbia, and of ecclesiastical silverware for various churches in Victoria. He was also commissioned to make the flatware for the Capilano Golf and Country Club.

An example of the work of William Maurice Carmichael struck with post 1934 Canadian marks:

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The above maker's mark of William Maurice Carmichael was the second one that he used, the first being 'W.M.C' contained within an oblong punch.

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Re: The Canadian Trade, Information, Advertisements, Etc.

Postby dognose » Thu May 16, 2013 2:14 pm

JAMES D. BAILEY & Co.

Janes Building, Yonge Street, later, Room 13, Yonge Street Arcade, Toronto

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Jas. D. Bailey & Co. - Toronto - 1914

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Jas. D. Bailey & Co. - Toronto - 1915

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J.D. Bailey & Co. - Toronto - 1917

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Jas.D. Bailey & Co. - Toronto - 1923


J. D. Bailey, Ltd., Toronto, Ont., has moved the showrooms from the Janes building, Yonge St., to Room 13, Yonge St. Arcade.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 4th November 1908

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