The Canadian Trade, Information, Advertisements, Etc.

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Re: The Canadian Trade, Information, Advertisements, Etc.

Postby dognose » Sun Nov 09, 2014 6:39 am

FOSTER & FLEISIG

Halifax, Nova Scotia


Foster & Fleisig, Halifax, N. S., have assigned to the Canada Permanent Trust Co.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 17th August 1921

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Re: The Canadian Trade, Information, Advertisements, Etc.

Postby dognose » Sun Nov 09, 2014 6:41 am

WASSERMAN & Co.

Edmonton, Alberta


Wasserman & Co., Edmonton, S. Alta, have assigned to the Montreal Trust Co.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 17th August 1921

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Re: The Canadian Trade, Information, Advertisements, Etc.

Postby dognose » Tue Nov 11, 2014 9:38 am

W.A. CRISP

Portage la Prairie, Manitoba


Mr W. A Crisp has opened out a new jewelry business at Portage la Prairie, Man , and hopes that by selling goods at right prices and paying strict attention to business, to merit a fair share of the public patronage.

Source: The Trader and Canadian Jeweller - April 1890

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Postby dognose » Tue Nov 11, 2014 9:43 am

JOHN ALLEN

Stouflville, later, Newmarket, Ontario


Change of Place.–Mr John Allen, retail jeweler of Stouflville, has removed his business from that place to the town of Newmarket, Ont., where all price lists, catalogues and registered letters should be addressed to him in future.

Source: The Trader and Canadian Jeweller - April 1890

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Re: The Canadian Trade, Information, Advertisements, Etc.

Postby dognose » Tue Nov 11, 2014 9:49 am

B. RICHARDSON

Aurora, Ontario


Mr B. Richardson, the retail jeweller of Aurora, has been laid up for nearly six weeks with a very severe attack of la grippe, which at one time seemed as if it would get the better of him. He is now we are happy to say on the fair road to complete convalescence.

Source: The Trader and Canadian Jeweller - April 1890

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Postby dognose » Tue Nov 11, 2014 9:53 am

JOHN A. VAN GUNTEN

Galt, Ontario


Fire.–We are sorry to learn that the stock of Mr. John A. Van Gunten, jeweler, of Galt, was damaged by a fire which broke out in the block he was in on the night of March 3rd. Mr. Van Gunten's loss was, we are happy to say, fully covered by insurance.

Source: The Trader and Canadian Jeweller - April 1890

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Re: The Canadian Trade, Information, Advertisements, Etc.

Postby dognose » Tue Nov 11, 2014 3:18 pm

J. SHAPIRA & Co.

Valleyfield, Quebec


Failed.–Messrs. J. Shapira & Co., who opened out a clothing and jewelry business at Valleyfield, Que , last fall are now absent, and there are few assets on the premises. Their liabilities are $6,000, mostly owing to Montreal and Toronto houses. The estate will probably pan out but little for the creditors.

Source: The Trader and Canadian Jeweller - April 1890

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Postby dognose » Tue Nov 11, 2014 3:27 pm

PATERSON BROTHERS

Bleury Street, Montreal


Selling Out –Messrs. Paterson Bros., the well-known retail jewelers of Bleury St., Montreal, are desirous of disposing of their business, as they propose to spend the remainder of their days in their native town in Scotland. As this is one of the best established jewelry businesses in Montreal, anyone wanting to step into a good thing from the start would do well to look into the matter.

Source: The Trader and Canadian Jeweller - April 1890

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Re: The Canadian Trade, Information, Advertisements, Etc.

Postby dognose » Tue Nov 11, 2014 3:30 pm

JOHN CARSWELL

Montreal


Can't Come Back.–The Canadian creditors of John Carswell, the absconding Montreal jeweler, had that worthy arrested on his arrival at Liverpool, England, intending to bring him back to Canada for trial. A severe illness has prevented this being carried out, at least for the present, but they will have the satisfaction of regaining about $500 worth of goods found in his possession, and paying about $1,000 for so doing.

Source: The Trader and Canadian Jeweller - April 1890

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Postby dognose » Tue Nov 11, 2014 3:34 pm

JAMES WILLIAMSON

Galt, Ontario


Going for Peddlers, James Williamson, a peddler of silverware, was fined $25 by Mayor Lutz, of Galt, Ont., for peddling without a license. Evidently the Mayor of Galt is rightly of the opinion that itinerant silverware dealers have no right to do business in the town which he presides, without contributing to the taxes the same as the resident jewellers are compelled to do.

Source: The Trader and Canadian Jeweller - April 1890

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Postby dognose » Tue Nov 11, 2014 3:39 pm

J.W. MILLER & Co.

Toronto


Dead.–Mr. R. Morrison, of the old and well-known firm of J W. Miller & Co . retail jewelers of this City, died on the 16th March after a short illness. Mr. Morrison was one of the oldest jewelers doing business in Toronto, and was a great favorite amongst the circle in which he moved. His remains were interred in the Necropolis, the service at the house being conducted by the Rev. C. Ruttan, rector of Norway. Over fifty carriages followed his remains to the cemetery, showing how warm a place he occupied in the hearts of those who knew him.

Source: The Trader and Canadian Jeweller - April 1890

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Re: The Canadian Trade, Information, Advertisements, Etc.

Postby dognose » Tue Nov 11, 2014 3:46 pm

GEORGE ANDREW

Winnipeg, Manitoba


Mr. George Andrew, the well-known retail jeweler of Winnipeg, Man., is endeavoring to effect a compromise with his creditors. His liabilities are said to be in the neighborhood of $15.000, which is mostly due to Montreal and Toronto houses. During the Manitoba land boom Mr. Andrew made a lot of money which he locked up in real estate, but not being able to realize the cash tor it before the boom collapsed, he has been saddled ever since with a heavy load of interest which has kept his nose pretty close to the commercial grindstone. He is one of the most honest and popular jewelers in the North-West, and stands so deservedly high in the estimation of all who have had any business relations with him, that it is thought he will have little or no trouble in effecting a favorable settlement with his creditors.

Source: The Trader and Canadian Jeweller - April 1890

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Postby dognose » Tue Nov 11, 2014 3:51 pm

FRED THAYER

Toronto


Laid Up - Mr. Fred Thayer, the well known wholesale jeweler of this city, has been confined to his house for the past fortnight with a serious attack of la grippe It came on while he was away on the road, but as he considered business of more importance than the grip, he tried to put it off with his usual offhand manner. His visitor, however, stuck to him in pretty much the same sort of fashion as jewelry travellers are said to stick to their customers, with the result that Mr. Theyer did not only to keep an appointment with Mr. Grip, but to spend two whole weeks of his valuable time in finding out the true inwardness of his business. We are glad to say that Mr. Thayer has at last succeeded in getting rid of his very troublesome guest, and he sincerely hopes he may never have a call from him again.

Source: The Trader and Canadian Jeweller - April 1890

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Re: The Canadian Trade, Information, Advertisements, Etc.

Postby dognose » Fri Nov 14, 2014 7:28 am

THE WINNIPEG ELECTRO-PLATING Co.

Winnipeg


The Winnipeg Electro-Plating Co. is no longer in existence. Mrs. R.E. Heaman was the only proprietor, and her husband, James Heaman ran the business under her name. They have both recently skipped out, and are believed to be in Duluth. The sheriff is in charge of the store.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 7th November 1894

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Re: The Canadian Trade, Information, Advertisements, Etc.

Postby dognose » Fri Nov 14, 2014 7:33 am

VON GUNTEN BROTHERS

Chatham, Ontario


C.L. Von Gunten, of the firm, Von Gunten Bros., jewelers, Chatham, Ont., died last week.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 7th November 1894

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Re: The Canadian Trade, Information, Advertisements, Etc.

Postby dognose » Fri Nov 14, 2014 7:47 am

ALEXANDER WARD HAUGH

Belleville, Ontario


Alexander Ward Haugh's store, Belleville, was entered last Thursday by burglars, who stole about $400 worth of watches and jewelery. The police arrested William Conlin and H.D. Marsseler on suspicion. They were remanded for a week.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 7th November 1894

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Postby dognose » Sun Nov 16, 2014 1:29 pm

HARRY N. HERTZ

48, Rideau Street, Ottawa


DISMISSES CHARGE AGAINST JEWELLER

Harry N. Hertz, of Ottawa Was Charged with Arson Following Store Fire

(Special to The Gazette.)

Ottawa. October 4. - Harry N. Hertz, Ottawa, jeweller, who has been facing an arson charge before Judge Francis Smiley, arising out of a fire at his store, at 48, Rideau street, last July, was freed when Judge Smiley dismissed the charge, after defence counsel, Royden A. Hughes, moved for such action without presenting any evidence. His Honor said that while gasoline was on the premises, according to the evidence, there was also evidence that such was used for cleaning purposes from time to time. Associated with Mr. Hughes as defence counsel was E.A. Anglin. Raoul Mercier, acting Crown Attorney, presented the evidence for the prosecution.


Source: The Montreal Gazette - 5th October 1936

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Postby dognose » Mon Nov 17, 2014 5:39 am

ABRAHAM ROSENTHAL

125, King Street West, Toronto


Abraham Rosenthal, Toronto, is preparing to start on a trip to Europe about the end of the month.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 18th March 1903



Abraham Rosenthal, the Toronto jeweler, who on the 18th inst. was held up in his store and robbed of $50,000 forth of diamonds, has offered a reward of $10,000 for the apprehension of the bandits or the recovery of the goods. Investigation since the robbery shows that about 350 pieces of diamond jewelry in addition to a number of costly loose stones were stolen by the bandits.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 30th June 1920



$50,000 Daylight Robbery in Toronto Jewelry Store

Three armed bandits broke into the jewelry store of Abraham Rosenthal, 125 King Street West, Toronto, in the early evening of June 18th, knocked the proprietor unconscious, and departed, taking with them jewelry – mostly diamonds – to the value of $50,000, and $3,000 worth of Victory Bonds.

They made a clean get-away in a big, high-powered touring car, and, so far as has yet been learned, left no clews by which they could be traced and apprehended. They had more than an hour's start before the police were put on the trail, and the latter are not sanguine as to the possibility of locating the thieves.

The plot for the robbery was long and carefully laid, and carried out with much nicety of detail, as will be seen from the following more or less
chronological account:

The principal in the daring robbery was a man about 25 years of age, fair complexioned and fair hair, about 5 feet 7 inches, and garbed in a spick and span Salvation Army uniform. Three visits he had made to the store during the week on the pretext of purchasing souvenirs. On each occasion he had made small purchases. He came again on the evening of June 18th, about 6.15, after Rosenthal had locked the front door and was putting his valuables away in the safe. When Rosenthal saw that the man rattling the front door insistently was his Salvation Army customer of the past week he unlocked it and permitted him to enter.

"Those souvenirs I got from you were allright," said the pseudo-Salvationist, when he got inside. "I would like to see a few more." Rosenthal turned and walked a few steps toward a showcase containing the articles, and was felled by a blow on the back of the head with the butt end of a heavy revolver. But he was not knocked unconscious. He staggered against the showcase, overturning it on the floor and smashing the glass, then grappled with his assailant, who had not quickly followed up his attack, believing the blow to have been effective. He grabbed the bandit by the lower lip, tore the lip at the corner of the mouth, and then succumbed to the blows of the fake Salvationist's two assistants, who had followed in within about a minute of their principal's entrance.

Together they tied his hands behind his back with a roll of cord which they brought with them, and gagged him with a heavy towel, which they bound around his head, inserting a knot in his mouth. They knew the route to the cellar, and dragged him down the stairs at the rear and pitched him on the floor. Then the three returned to the store, in two or three minutes emptied, Rosenthal's trays of diamond rings and brooches into a little brown club bag which one of the men carried, cleaned out the compartment of the safe containing Victory Bonds, and walked coolly out of the front door, across King Street and up York to the corner of Pearl Street, where they had their motor car parked.

In the scuffle in the store the Salvationist's army hat was knocked off and kicked under the show case, where he left it when he made his escape with his companions. Besides the hat the police afterwards found a bloody handkerchief which he probably used to stem the flow of blood from his mouth. It was the hatless Salvationist with a bloody mouth leaving the jewelry store with two companions, one of whom carried a bag, that aroused the suspicions of a citizen standing at the southeast corner of King and York Streets. He had been at the store himself five minutes previously, and had encountered the locked door. He went into the Prince George Hotel to call Harry Rosenthal, brother of Abraham, advising him to investigate.

It was some few minutes before Henry Rosenthal was able to find his brother bound and gagged on the cellar floor. They released him and carried him into a drug store next door to administer restoratives and doctor his wounded head. There was a regrettable delay at this juncture, according to police officials, in informing the police of the occurrence. Three-quarters of an hour passed during the time they were doctoring Abraham and getting from him a coherent story. Although the robbery occurred between 6.15 and 6.30, it was 7.40 when the first intimation of the robbery reached the police.

The man masquerading as a Salvationist is described by Rosenthal as about twenty-five years of age, fair, 5 feet 7 inches and thin faced. Number two is about the same age, 5 feet 8 inches, dark complexioned, thin face, and wore a brown suit and brown fedora hat. There is little certain information concerning the appearance of bandit number three.

The bandits are believed to be Americans, as the car. which was seen as it departed (long before the robbery was discovered) was observed to bear an American number.

The robbery is the biggest haul ever made by bandits in Toronto. A reward of $5,000 has been offered for the capture of the thieves.


Source: The Trader and Canadian Jeweller - July 1920


D. E. Elwood, alleged to be one of the men who assaulted and robbed Abraham Rosenthal, jeweler of Toronto, June 18, was arrested in Miami, Fla., the police following clues furnished by a handkerchief, the the Salvationists' cap worn by one of the gang, and the number of the car they used. Edward Crowe, employed by Rosenthal as a watchmaker, positively identified Elwood as the member of the party who posed as a Salvationist. Extradition proceedings were instituted, but according to a telegram Elwood was released by the Miami police on a writ of habeas corpus, on the ground, apparently, of the failure of a warrant sworn out at the place of the crime to arrive within 24 hours of the arrest.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 18th August 1920


An action brought by Dewitt C. Ellwood, a real estate broker of Miami, Fla., against Abraham Rosenthal, jeweler, of Toronto, claiming $50,000 damages for malicious prosecution and libel, came up for trial on May 17 and 18, before Judge Lennox. In June, 1920, Rosenthal was assaulted and his store robbed by motor bandits, who secured $50,000 worth of diamonds. Ellwood, who had been in Toronto about the time the robbery occurred, was arrested on suspicion and brought to Toronto, where he had no difficulty in proving an alibi. He stated in his evidence that he had incurred expenses amounting to about $6,000 owing to his arrest, and that an important business deal in which he was engaged had fallen through on account of the affair. Judge Lennox withdrew the case from the jury and dismissed action, holding that there was no evidence of malice and that Rosenthal was not responsible for any libelous statements printed in connection with the case.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 24th May 1922

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Postby dognose » Mon Nov 17, 2014 11:50 am

A.C. LESLIE & Co.

Montreal


Image
A.C. Leslie & Co. - Montreal - 1896

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Re: The Canadian Trade, Information, Advertisements, Etc.

Postby dognose » Tue Nov 18, 2014 6:21 am

G.M. COCHRANE

Milestone and Rouleau, Saskatchewan


G. M. Cochrane, jeweler of Milestone and Rouleau, Sask., is succeeded by W. A. Cochrane.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 1st November 1922

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