Information Regarding Spaulding & Co. - Chicago

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Information Regarding Spaulding & Co. - Chicago

Postby dognose » Wed Dec 19, 2012 3:22 pm

A biography of Henry Abiram Spaulding of Spaulding & Co. of Chicago and Paris, written in 1894:


HENRY ABIRAM SPAULDING


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If there is any art in which all the dross is worn away and by refining process the full beauty of every truth of the material world is made to stand before the eyes of men, it is the art of the jeweler. Beauty is God's trademark, proving His handiwork, and the craft of the jeweler, utilizing all the resources of fine stones and ores for the adornment of common life, is in line with divine methods. While the ancients reserved beauty for picture, or statue or temple, the art of the jeweler has helped to distribute it upon the articles of common life, sprinkling it o'er the table, altar or mantelpiece, making all utensils of food and drink become ministers of the highest forms of beauty. In the museums of Europe and this country jewels of various nations are among the most interesting and instructive collections. They afford the data for the study of the customs of races long since passed away, leaving behind them frequently no fuller record of their existence than such as is contained in these collections of their appliances for personal decoration. From the polished and engraved bones of the lake dwellers up to the quaint but exquisitely worked jewelry of the Etruscans, the Romans and the Byzantians, the gradual growth of the art can be traced step by step, and the different national characteristics of the various peoples can be studied as accurately as in their architecture or any other records of their culture which have come down to us. While the business of the honest jeweler preaches a sermon of truth in its very elements, there are spurious jewelers, who by dealing in spurious jewels, teach a lesson of deceit and false pretense. The jeweler should be a gem in himself, resplendent among his fellow-men for his innate probity and the honesty of his representations. He should, above all, know his art to perfection, lest he deceive through being himself deceived. The profession, for such it truly is, demands a large share of the taste of the artist, the breadth and knowledge of the man of science, and the activity and acuteness of the man of affairs; indeed, it is doubtful if there is any other calling demanding so much technical information, such strict familiarity with a wide realm of objects or so much refined and experienced taste as must be possessed by the head of such a business. There are many experts in gems and jewels, both in this country and throughout the Old World, but in Henry Abiram Spaulding, head of the celebrated house of Spaulding & Co., Chicago possesses one whose opportunities to inform himself almost infallibly in all departments of the lore of the jeweler's art have not been surpassed by those of any other connoisseur in the Old World or the New; and, as few men have had more to do with the extension of the American jewelry trade in foreign lands than Mr. Spaulding, his career has attracted the widest notice and comment, and is one which must prove exceptionally interesting, not only to the student of international commerce, but especially to citizens of Chicago who desire to know something of their most successful contemporary.

Mr. Spaulding is not only a jeweler, but the son of a jeweler. His father, however, abandoned the jewelry trade, and, following the bent of a mind naturally scientific, took up the profession of medicine, and became a physician of skill and prominence. New York City was the place of Mr. Spaulding's nativity, and he was born November 11,1837, to Dr. Abiram and Julia A. (Thornton) Spaulding. Dr. Spaulding was of the sixth generation of Spauldings in America, counting from Edward, the founder of the branch of the family to which Henry Abiram Spaulding belongs. The name Spaulding appears quite early in English history, and the name, as a patronymic, is on the Continent as well as in Great Britain. The Spauldings of America, except a few who have recently emigrated to this country, are all descendants from three ancient families, one of which, with whom this sketch has most to do, settled in Massachusetts, a second in Maryland and a third in Georgia.

Edward Spaulding, the first of the name of whom we have any knowledge, came to America in the earliest years of the Massachusetts colony, probably between 1630 and 1633. He was made a freeman in 1640. In 1652-55 he was prominent in connection with the laying out and incorporation of Chelmsford, Mass. He was one of the proprietors of the “New Field," which was included in an addition made to the town plan in 1656, but which was not fenced and so named until 1669. Others of the family were conspicuous in connection with the primitive history of this old town. He was twice married, and died in 1670. His youngest child, Andrew, was born in 1652, and under his father's will succeeded to the paternal estate. He was chosen deacon of the church and held that office at the time of his death, which occurred in 1713. Andrew, his eldest son and second child, was born in 1678. He lived in Chelmsford, and was a deacon in the church, and otherwise prominent. He died in 1753. James, his ninth child and seventh son, was born in Chelmsford in 1714, and settled at Westford. He removed to New Ipswich, N. H., but after a few years returned to Westford, where he died about 1790. Silas, the sixth son, and eleventh child of James, was born at Westford, Mass., in 1757, and died at Fort Ann, N. Y., in 1812. He was a soldier of the Revolution, and was at the battle of Bennington, Vt.,and at the surrender of Burgoyne, and in the engagements which preceded it. After the war he married Hannah Brown and settled at Granville, N. Y., whence he removed to Fort Ann. His youngest child, Dr. Abiram Spaulding, father of Henry Abiram Spaulding, was born at Fort Ann, N. Y., May 9, 1807. He had two sons and four daughters, of whom the immediate subject of this sketch was the fourth in order of birth. He died December, 1887, at Aurora, Ill.

Henry Abiram Spaulding first saw Chicago in 1848, when he came West with his father's family, journeying by water from New York, and consuming on the trip fully a month. The family located in Aurora, Ill., where the elder Spaulding engaged in the jewelry trade. Six years later, when he was seventeen, and had acquired considerable education and no little knowledge of the jewelry and general business, young Spaulding accepted a position offered him in the old-time dry goods store of Olmstead & Co., on Lake Street, opposite the little old store of Potter Palmer, where the afterward merchant prince conducted a small business somewhat on the plan of the country village storekeeper of to-day. That was in 1854, the year of the opening of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad, and Mr. Spaulding made the journey from Aurora to Chicago as a passenger on the first locomotive that ever ran over that line between the two cities. It was vastly different from the improved engines of to-day, but it fulfilled its mission and was a wonder to all who beheld it for the first time; and, indeed, the railroad itself was a rude affair, consisting of “ stringers " laid on sleepers, and surmounted by “ strap " rail, and the experiences on the old “Q" road with “ strap" rail were no less dangerous and amusing than those on other lines of similar construction. Mr. Spaulding's next employment was with the dry goods house of Williams, Case & Rhodes, which was swept away in the panic of 1857. This disaster did not seriously inconvenience him, however, and it may have been a blessing in disguise, for he was offered and accepted a place in the great New York establishment of Ball, Black & Co., at that time one of the world's famous jewelry houses. There he was afforded exceptional opportunity to acquire a knowledge of gems and jewels, which he perfected in his subsequent experience. His connection with this house continued until 1864, when he engaged in the jewelry trade for himself, in New York, as a member of the firm of Browne & Spaulding, which was in existence until 1871.

Attracted by his success, the celebrated house of Tiffany & Co. made him a most flattering proposition to become its general representative in Europe; and in 1871 he entered upon a memorably successful career with this establishment, which resulted in the bestowal upon it of prestige such as no other American house ever had, and ended only when Mr. Spaulding engaged in his present enterprise in Chicago. During the whole period of, his connection with Tiffany & Co. Mr. Spaulding had headquarters in Paris, France. Probably no other man, certainly no other American, has had such an opportunity as was his to examine the world's famous gems. He went to Europe with letters of the highest commendation from Gen. Grant, Vice-President Schuyler Colfax, Chief Justice Waite, and others no less distinguished; and an acquaintance with the Prince of Wales, formed during the visit of the heir-apparent to this country in 1860, enabled him to visit all the royal families of Europe, with the heads and principal members of which he had personal interviews. His acquaintance with these distinguished personages, thus auspiciously formed, enabled him to inspect all the priceless crown jewels of the Old World, as well as all the rare gems and jewels owned by different members of the several royal households. Among the large and costly jewels submitted to him were some with most interesting histories, notably the following: "The Regent," the largest of the crown jewels of France, required two years in cutting. It was found at Parteal, and weighs 410 carats. It was bought by the Regent of France, in 1717, for 12,000,000 francs. A slave is said to have stolen it, and hidden it in an incision made for the purpose in his thigh. It was afterward found and returned, and adorned the crown of Louis XV. “The Orloff," belonging to the Russian crown, weighs 194 1/4 carats, and cost $450,000, and a life pension of $4,000 annually. “The Florentine," the richest jewel of the crown collection of Austria, weighing 139 1/2 carats, is valued at $105,000. “The Hassac," owned by the Duke of Westminster, weighs 79 1/4 carats, and is valued at $30,000. “ The L’igott," owned by a London jeweler, weighs 82 1/4 carats, and is worth $150,o00. “The Tiffany Stone," belonging to Tiffany 8: Co., weighs 125 1/2 carats. He was shown a sapphire and diamond brooch belonging to Czar of Russia, and valued at $800,000. The richest sapphire was 2 1/4 inches in diameter, and was surrounded by diamonds each as large as a hazel nut.

It is doubtful if any other American ever made so extensive a tour of the Old World and met so many of its dignitaries and so many representatives of its royalty, and no man traveling in the Old World without official prestige ever had conferred upon him so much honor by men and women who rarely condescend to meet representatives of commercial interests under any circumstances. At Sandringham Hall, Mr. Spaulding had the honor, after an interview with the Prince and Princess of Wales, during which he consented to supply certain costly jewelry, of being presented with game shot by the Prince and other valuable mementoes of the occasion which were dispatched to London for him. He also was specially invited to afternoon tea to Lady Paget's house, where he met some most notable members of the peerage and attachies of the Court, as well as the ambassadors from the principal foreign powers, among whom were the Duc de Repulo, Comte Zeweske, the Baron Tefferbrieck and Prince Biron de Courlude. His visit to Queen Victoria at Windsor Castle was also most memorable. Sir Henry Ponsonby, the Queen's Equerry, presented Mr. Spaulding with admission to the dais on the occasion of the general ceremonial opening of court, in appreciation of the satisfaction Mr. Spaulding had given the royal family in the matter of the finest jewelry. He was treated with equal distinction at other European courts. During his residence in Paris, he was frequently dined by Vice-President Morton, then minister to France. Upon all the important occasions during that period. he was one of the distinguished guests, notably at the inauguration ceremony of Bartholdi's statue of “ Liberty Enlightening the World." Thereafter in New York a special place was reserved to all those who were present at the Paris inauguration to witness the re-inauguration in America. As a proof of the confidence reposed in him by our ambassadors to foreign parts, with whom his relations were always most cordial, he was entrusted on nearly every one of his return voyages from the different capitals of Europe, with special dispatches to the government. The handsome certificates of the “ Bearer of Dispatches" form a very interesting feature of the large correspondence incident to that remarkable period of activity and diligence. Among his most constant correspondents at that time were Chief Justice Waite, Vice-President Colfax, Secretary Babcock, Hon. Samuel S. (“Sunset") Cox, and others equally eminent. Mr. Spaulding was successful in making arrangements which resulted in the appointment of Tiffany & Co. as gold and silversmiths to Her Most Gracious Majesty the Queen of England, His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales, Her Royal Highness the Princess of \Vales, His Royal Highness the Duke of Edinburgh, Their Imperial Majesties the Emperor and Empress of Russia, His Imperial Highness the Grand Duke Valdimir, His Imperial Highness the Grand Duke Alexis, His Imperial Highness the Grand Duke Paul, His Imperial Highness the Grand Duke Sergius, His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of Austria, His Majesty the King of Prussia, His Majesty the King of the Belgians, His Majesty the King of Italy, His Majesty the King of Denmark, His Majesty the King of Spain, His Majesty the King of Portugal, the Khedive of Egypt, and His Imperial Majesty the Shah of Persia, as well as to the Emperor of Brazil; and the house had conferred upon it the gold medal “ Proemia Digno," from the Emperor of Russia, in 1883, and the Grand Prix and Legion of Honor, Paris, in 1879.

Having a full appreciation of the artistic side of his calling, Mr. Spaulding's idea was and is to promote the taste for the beautiful and refined in the precious metals and the costly stones in that city in which he had his first noteworthy business experience, and in whose great future he always had the most unbounded faith, and in 1888 he determined, after quite extensive correspondence with prominent Chicagoans who favored the idea most enthusiastically, among them Levi Z. Leiter and George M. Pullman, to embark in his present enterprise in this city, but not until his loyalty to the house Tiffany & Co. had led him to exhaust every argument and device of persuasion in an attempt to induce that company to open a branch here. Many were the regrets of Mr. Tiffany, who fully appreciated Mr. Spaulding's great achievements in behalf of his house, but Mr. Spaulding felt that he had a most important mission, and finally telegraphed from Paris his determination to relinquish his connection with the New York firm and enter upon the great field in the West. The house of Spaulding & Co., at State and Jackson Streets, Chicago, and 36 Avenue de l'Opera, Paris, France, was established and incorporated that year. It has a paid-up capital of $500,000, and its officers are Henry A. Spaulding, president: Edward Forman, secretary, and Lloyd Milner, treasurer. It does a general business as gold and silversmiths, and manufactures extensively. occupying four floors, each 147 x 40 feet in area, as salesrooms, and a third for its manufacturing department, and employs in all its branches from eighty to one hundred persons. The associates of Mr. Spaulding are men of business ability and experience, and each is thoroughly informed in the special departments of the important business of the house to which, by a natural division of labor, he devotes his attention.

In less than five years “ Spaulding's" has been made to Chicago what “ Tiffany's" is to New York, and it is doubtful if any other business establishment in the city attracts so many visitors who come, not especially to buy, but to see the unique and magnificent display of beautiful things there silently but surely doing their part in the great work of human refinement, for which the age in which we live is wonderful above all that have preceded it. Every day adds to this rich treasure house, and visitors to Chicago will find here a display of rare gems, ornaments and jewelry second only to that of Tiffany & Co. The Parisian branch of Spaulding & Co. is the most conspicuous American addition to that city in the way of adornment and trade. The show-rooms beneath the chambers of the American Consulate are handsomely decorated in white and gold. The enthusiasm of the Parisians is especially awakened by the “Evening Room," draped in black velvet, and in other respects very like the "Gem Boudoir" of the Chicago house. Chicago is benefited by the Paris branch in that it enables Spaulding & Co. to secure for the Chicago establishment every Parisian novelty directly it appears, and very many such novelties and precious objects of art, are received by every steamer. It is a fact of much significance in this connection that within four to six days' journey from Chicago are to be found quite plentifully not only gold and silver and the richest and most beautifully colored marbles, but sapphires, spinel rubies, topaz, smoked topaz, and other gems, while such stones as must necessarily be imported are as easily accessible to Chicagoans as to jewelers on either coast. This, taken in consideration with the city's great and growing trade in gems and jewels and all their kindred articles, must indicate that the day is rapidly approaching when Chicago will be the center of this trade for the American continent.

Mr. Spaulding was married December 17, 1874, to Miss Cornelia Russell, of New York City, daughter of J. G. Russell, who was one of the pioneers in commercial navigation and was one of the proprietors of the Black Ball line of boats, in use long before the introduction of steamers. To Mr. and Mrs. Spaulding have been born two children named Russell and Marguerite. In social life Mr. Spaulding has been prominent, but he really cares little for society, in the ordinary sense, and the attractions of his own fireside are too strong to admit of his becoming a man of the world, as the term is usually understood. He is a member of the Stanley Club of Paris, and has long been identified with the Chicago Club, of this city. but he often says, when speaking of this fact, that to him “home is the best club of all." He is recognized as a typical American and as a fit representative of the great State of Illinois. as was demonstrated when he was appointed commissioner for Illinois at the World‘s Exposition, at Paris, in 1889. His report, when his duties were terminated by the close of the exposition, embraced facts of the greatest importance to the general public, and for that reason it was given to the press by Gov. Fifer, who wrote Mr. Spaulding, commending it in the highest terms. In all things Mr. Spaulding is an enthusiastic Chicagoan, proud of the city, and doing it honor, not alone in the high character he gives to his branch of trade, but in every other way possible to a progressive and patriotic citizen. , He has watched its growth almost from a country village, and during all the years since he first saw it, his faith in its future has never wavered. He believed years ago, as he believes now, in a destiny that proclaimed it the future metropolis of a continent, and in the full vigor of his business life, he beholds it, in many respects, the greatest city in the world.


Source: Industrial Chicago - Volume 4 - 1894

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Re: Henry Abiram Spaulding - Spaulding & Co. - Chicago

Postby dognose » Fri Dec 21, 2012 9:57 am

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Spaulding & Co. - Chicago and Paris - 1914

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Spaulding & Co. - Chicago and Paris - 1922

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Re: Henry Abiram Spaulding - Spaulding & Co. - Chicago

Postby dognose » Fri Feb 08, 2013 4:33 am

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Spaulding & Co. - Chicago and Paris - 1918

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Re: Henry Abiram Spaulding - Spaulding & Co. - Chicago

Postby dognose » Wed Dec 10, 2014 7:42 am

G. E. Throop, a gentleman from New York new to the jewelry trade. has been engaged to occupy a managerial position with Spaulding & Co. He will assist Mr. Milnor, president of the house, in the multiplicity of duties which devolve upon him –a position, in general, similar to that formerly occupied by Mr. Foreman. Mr. Throop has already taken hold.

Source: The Jewelers' Review - 12th April 1899

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Re: Henry Abiram Spaulding - Spaulding & Co. - Chicago

Postby dognose » Wed Dec 24, 2014 11:16 am

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Spaulding & Co. - Chicago - 1913

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Re: Henry Abiram Spaulding - Spaulding & Co. - Chicago

Postby dognose » Sun Jan 04, 2015 1:54 pm

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Spaulding & Co. - Chicago - 1903

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Re: Henry Abiram Spaulding - Spaulding & Co. - Chicago

Postby dognose » Thu Jun 18, 2015 6:51 am

William Poetterches, a jewelry designer, employed by Spaulding & Co., and his two sons, aged 15 and 17, narrowly escaped drowning Sunday, Oct. 10, when a motor boat in which they were riding about a mile off shore shipped water and sank. The boat was simply a steel rowboat with a motor attached to the rear. The shallow craft became caught in the troughs and shipped water. Suddenly it sank. The trio struggled in vain for some minutes, as none of them could swim. Capt. Thomas Levy, skipper of the Mayflower, a power cruiser, happening upon the scene, saw Mr. Poetterches and his two sons struggling in the water. Immediately he tied a rope about his waist and, with two men holding on to the other end, he plunged into the heavy sea. The youngest boy was sinking, and the skipper took him aboard the cruiser first. He then rescued the other boy. Poetterches is said to have been in a very weakened condition when Captain Levy finally reached him.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 20th October 1920

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Re: Henry Abiram Spaulding - Spaulding & Co. - Chicago

Postby dognose » Sun Jun 21, 2015 7:09 am

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Spaulding & Co. - Chicago - 1906

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Re: Henry Abiram Spaulding - Spaulding & Co. - Chicago

Postby dognose » Fri Jul 03, 2015 1:47 pm

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Spaulding & Co. - Paris and Chicago - 1894

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Re: Henry Abiram Spaulding - Spaulding & Co. - Chicago

Postby dognose » Mon Jul 06, 2015 3:45 am

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Spaulding & Co. - Chicago - 1915

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Re: Henry Abiram Spaulding - Spaulding & Co. - Chicago

Postby dognose » Wed Sep 23, 2015 1:39 pm

A Madman Breaks Spaulding & Co.'s Window and Grabs a Silver Pitcher

Chicago, Ill., Nov. 19. While the crowds of shoppers were making their way along State St. yesterday afternoon a wild eyed man detached himself from the throng at State St. and Jackson Boulevard and, walking over to the large show window to the right of the street entrance to Spaulding & Co.'s jewelry store, proceeded to gain access to the wares displayed by breaking the glass with the butt of a huge revolver. The sight of the weapon caused a panic in the crowd, but the would-be robber kept at his work until the plate gave way. Then, seizing a large silver pitcher, he ran toward the Jackson Boulevard crossing. But his moments of freedom were numbered. Louis Alrutz, the firm's doorman, and Martin Douce, an ex-policeman, who is now acting as a porter for the firm, were witnesses of the theft and managed to capture the man before he could mix with the crowd and make his escape.

At the station the prisoner gave the name of Thomas Smith and the place of his birth as New Jersey. He had come to Chicago, according to his statement, only a few hours before the commission of the act. Upon being searched by the officers at the station, he was found to have upon his person the sum of $175 in cash, railroad tickets from Chicago to San Francisco, to Kansas City and to St. Louis, and a commutation ticket upon one of the suburban railroads in the last named city. He is of average height, of blonde complexion, and wears the garments and has the general appearance of a workingman in comfortable circumstances. When asked for his motive in committing the act of burglary, Smith said that he was ordered by pursuing spirits to shoot, stab and destroy. These, he added, were ever near him and persistently whispered into his ears. Upon receiving this information the lieutenant at the station left an order for the city physician to examine the prisoner for his sanity.

The display of silverware so rudely disturbed by Smith was removed and a new glass quickly put into place. With the arrival of workman upon the scene the crowd that had gathered dispersed. Within the store there had been but little tumult. The whole affair had passed so quickly and so quietly that but a few knew of it until it was all over. As the pitcher was recovered there was no loss other than the plate glass window.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 23rd November 1898

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Re: Henry Abiram Spaulding - Spaulding & Co. - Chicago

Postby dognose » Mon Sep 28, 2015 5:42 am

C. S. Hannan, of Spaulding & Co., expects to sail for Europe about the 10th of July, to be gone through the summer. Mrs. Hannan will accompany him.

Source: The Jewelers Review - 21st June 1899

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Re: Henry Abiram Spaulding - Spaulding & Co. - Chicago

Postby dognose » Thu Oct 01, 2015 12:06 pm

CHICAGO

Mr. Moore, of Spaulding & Co., was kept away from his work last week by a dangerous and very painful abscess on his right hand. The trouble came from scratching a mosquito bite, and for a time blood poisoning was feared. Mr. Moore has suffered a great deal.


Source: The Jewelers Review - 28th June 1899

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Re: Henry Abiram Spaulding - Spaulding & Co. - Chicago

Postby dognose » Sun Oct 11, 2015 3:55 am

Messrs. Spaulding & Co. have issued an attractive catalogue of their "Treasures from Spain" collection. The booklet is tastefully printed on rough deckle edged paper, and is resplendent with a bright yellow cover.

Source: The Jewelers Review - 12th April 1899

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Re: Henry Abiram Spaulding - Spaulding & Co. - Chicago

Postby dognose » Wed Oct 28, 2015 5:19 am

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Spaulding & Cie. - Paris - 1901

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Re: Henry Abiram Spaulding - Spaulding & Co. - Chicago

Postby dognose » Fri Nov 06, 2015 5:21 am

CHICAGO

Lloyd Milnar, president of Spaulding & Co., returned from the East last week.

W. H. Harb, of Spaulding & Co., is on his vacation. He is in Kansas City.

C. S. Hannan, of Spaulding & Co., expects to sail for Europe about the 10th of July, to be gone through the summer. Mrs. Hannan will accompany him.


Source: The Jewelers Review - 21st June 1899

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Re: Henry Abiram Spaulding - Spaulding & Co. - Chicago

Postby dognose » Sat Nov 07, 2015 6:18 am

Fred M. Lund of Spaulding & Co., has been appointed supervisor for the Horological Institute of America in the Chicago district. The selection of Mr. Lund for this post is a distinction, inasmuch as the Horological Institute of America is an important scientific body formed under governmental auspices to encourage the study of watchmaking and watch repairing and thereby relieve the great shortage of men skilled in these fine mechanical branches, which is one of the present problems of the watch industry. The district supervisor will have charge of certain phases of the work of certifying watchmakers according to their degree of skill, so that the institute may issue certificates showing which ones are competent to make repairs to watches and clocks of the community.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 11th October 1922

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Re: Henry Abiram Spaulding - Spaulding & Co. - Chicago

Postby dognose » Wed Nov 11, 2015 5:55 am

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Spaulding & Co. - Chicago - 1912

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Re: Henry Abiram Spaulding - Spaulding & Co. - Chicago

Postby dognose » Sat Nov 14, 2015 7:33 am

Sec'y Forman. of the Spaulding Co., and Geo. W. Prentiss, Chicago manager of the Gorham Mfg. Co., returned from the East last week. They both visited the Gorham Co.'s factory in Providence, spent some time in the metropolis, and Mr. Forman finished up his trip by going to Washington for a few days.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 16th September 1891

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Re: Henry Abiram Spaulding - Spaulding & Co. - Chicago

Postby dognose » Wed Nov 18, 2015 6:13 am

"We are selling a larger proportion of fine goods than of the smaller, compared with previous years," says Manager Forman, of Spaulding & Co. Diamond goods and fine silver wares are prominent in the sales of this house.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 12th December 1894

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