Scottish Advertisements and Information

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Re: Scottish Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Thu Aug 08, 2013 5:30 am

WILLIAM LOGAN

Ballater

WATCH LOST

About ten days since, there was taken out of a house in the neighbourhood of Kincardine O'Neil, a silver watch; maker's name: T. Berres, London. No.1478; and being out of repair at the time, she will probably soon be put into the hands of a Tradesman for repairing. Therefore, if lodged with a Watchmaker, or seen by any other person, it is hoped that she will be detained, and information sent to Mr James Aiken, Watchmaker, Kincardine O'Niel; or Mr William Logan, Watchmaker, Ballater - either of whom will give a suitable reward.
It is thought she has been taken to the Aboyne Play-Friday Market, and sold or exchanged there.


Source: Aberdeen Journal - 4th August 1830

It is interesting to note that the watch in question was refered to in the female gender.

Trev.

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Re: Scottish Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Thu Aug 08, 2013 5:46 am

ANDREW WALLACE

Ayr

There were a few silversmiths noted as working in Ayr during the 19th century, but one who appeared to grab the headlines more than most was the jeweller, Andrew Wallace. Below are some details that were appeared in various publications in the 1800's:


Those who had been at Glasgow or Edinburgh generally returned with something new, such as an addition to or change in their dress, and all was duly noted and commented on. A dashing jeweller, bearing a patriotic name, who went to Edinburgh occasionally to replenish his plate, once took advantage of his trip to get his hair dressed in Princes Street. Such an occurrence could not escape notice, and the news soon spread, after the first tea and card party the jeweller attended. Accordingly, whenever he was seen leaving by the Telegraph, the remark was current that Jeweller Wallace had gone to Edinburgh to get his hair cut.

Source: Reminiscences of 'Auld Ayr' - James Paterson - 1864


The Dublin "Leerie" – Hamilton, the Fresh Water Sailor, and the Watch Robbery.
Before the introduction of gas, Ayr was very imperfectly lighted by a few dim, glimmering oil lamps, which generally became extinct about midnight. The magistrates had always a difficulty to get a " leerie" to light and trim the lamps during the season, so much so that they had to advertise annually in the county papers for some individual to fill the situation, as no one in the town would take the office on any consideration. This arose partly from the meanness of the office, and partly from the torment the holders of it used to experience from the youths of the town, who wickedly and maliciously tormented the holder of it during the time he exercised his special avocation. I remember of a "leerie" coming from Dublin, about forty-two years ago ; he was a tall, stout man, dressed in sailor fashion, with blue trousers and jacket, and a glazed hat. He was tormented very much, and being of a fiery temper, would in return charge the boys through the streets, not unfrequently throwing the flaming torch at them. In some instances the boys were severely burned. So frequent became these collisions, and so sore was the damage done by the "leerie", that the magistrates determined to dismiss him, which, as soon as they had secured the services of another, was done. It was on a Saturday that he was dismissed, and between Sunday night and Monday morning the shop of Mr. Andrew Wallace, jeweller, was broken into, and a great number of valuable watches and other articles extracted. The robbery had been committed by cutting a piece out of the window shutter, large enough to admit a hand and an arm to work freely. The shop was in a building a little below the Fish Cross, on the right hand side going up the street, and formerly known as the Gallery of Fashion. The second flat had been fitted up, and was occupied by one M'Adam, from Glasgow, as a haberdashery warehouse, who gave it the designation referred to. The shop windows were bow-shaped at that time, plate-glass being then unknown as a window ornament. The entrance to the shop was by two steps from the pavement. It was the custom of Mr. Wallace to visit his shop every night before going to bed, to see that all was right. On the night in question, as he was making his usual survey, he found a man standing in at the door of the shop, and at once asked him what he wanted there. He was answered by the individual that he was waiting for a comrade, being bound to sea that night, and the evening being rainy, he had stepped in to shun the shower. After this explanation, Mr. Wallace remarked that it was not a place for him to be standing, and requested him to go away, while he himself went to bed without thinking any more of the matter. In the morning he was awakened, and informed that his shop had been broken into during the night. On repairing to his shop and examining, he found his loss to be considerable. The authorities were immediately informed of the occurrence, Mr. Wallace at the same time narrating the circumstance of the preceding evening, describing the man as tall and dressed in sailor garb. Angus Gunn, the thief-catcher, was sent for, who, on hearing all the circumstances, immediately suspected the late leerie. On going to his lodgings, Gunn found that he had sailed for Dublin that morning about two o'clock, which confirmed his suspicions. Gunn was in a dilemma, as there were no steamboats in those days to follow and overtake the vessel. Repairing to the shore, he saw the vessel becalmed a little way off the Heads of Ayr, and immediately addressed a fresh-water sailor, named Hamilton, telling him the occurrence, and on whom his suspicions rested. Hamilton still further strengthened Gunn's suspicions by saying that he had seen the leerie go aboard the becalmed vessel, carrying with him a box which seemed rather heavy. The sailor volunteered his services to procure a boat, and take the messenger of justice to the ship to apprehend the leerie. The sequel will show with what confidence a villain will charge an innocent person with the crime which he himself has committed. A boat was got, manned, and with Mr. Gunn on board, soon rowed to the vessel. When the ship was reached, Mr. Gunn informed the captain of his mission, and requested his assistance in his search. The lamp-lighter was kept under strict surveillance while the thief-catcher and others made a search of his luggage, and, in truth, of the whole ship from stem to stern, but without avail; none of the missing property was found, nor even a trace of it. The suspected person was accordingly allowed to proceed on his voyage, and Mr. Gunn returned to land disappointed at heing unsuccessful in recovering the stolen articles and apprehending the thief. His suspicions afterwards fell on other parties, and among the rest Hamilton himself came under his eye, but after searching his house, and other suspicious places without success, the case was abandoned as altogether hopeless.

Hamilton after this went to sea, and sailed several trips to and from Ireland. On the last trip he and a shipmate quarrelled about some matter over a glass of grog, and Hamilton being cognisant of the fact that his shipmate had taken some soap on board to smuggle to this country, went in revenge, and to curry favour with the captain after they had put to sea, and informed him what the sailor had done. The captain immediately ordered the sailor to bring the soap on deck and throw it overboard, lest the ship should be seized when it came into port. The sailor being done out of his soap, in retaliation resolved to be revenged on Hamilton. He knew that Hamilton had been suspected of being engaged in the shop robbery in Ayr, and had had his suspicions roused by seeing Hamilton, on more than one occasion, offer valuable watches for sale in Ireland; and further, by having seen more than one in his possession. He informed the captain, who had no great notion of Hamilton's honesty, of his surmises. When they reached Ayr Bay, the pilot and a tide-waiter came on board as usual. The captain asked the waiter to examine Hamilton's chest carefully, as he had been informed that he had some valuable watches and other seizable articles in his possession. Accordingly he examined Hamilton's chest with more than ordinary care, and on doing so observed that the inside of it was shallow in comparison with the depth outside. This led to further examination, when it was discovered that the chest had a false bottom. On lifting this he was astonished to see it filled with watches. The owner was instantly ordered below and a guard placed over him. The boat was sent ashore, which soon returned with Hamilton's old acquaintance, the thief-catcher, who took him into custody, and also carried away the discovered property. Mr Wallace identified the watches as those which had been stolen from him. Hamilton was tried for the crime at the ensuing circuit, found guilty, and sentenced to be executed. He then made a confession of the robbery, stating that he had hid the watches in a hay-stack in the corner of Provost Shaw's Park, where they had lain for several weeks before he could get an opportunity to remove them; he further stated that he had more than once tried to get them disposed of in Ireland, but could not accomplish his desire. Hamilton's wife had some time before this been wet nurse in a nobleman's family near Edinburgh. The family, on her account, used all their influence, and got the husband's sentence commuted to transportation for life. Hamilton was sent to Botany Bay, where he was liberated in a few years, and appointed Chief Constable of the colony. In this situation he amassed a considerable sum of money, sent for his son, who had been left chargeable on the parish after his father's banishment and mother's death, and placed him in affluent circumstances in the colony. Thus, it ultimately turned out to be a lucky thing for Hamilton and his son that he had at one time rubbed shoulders with the gallows. We would not, however, advise any one to try the same trick, lest he should not be so fortunate.


Source: An Historical Account of the Town of Ayr for the Last Fifty Years - James Howie - 1861


In April 1816, twenty-three watches were abstracted from the shop of Mr Wallace, jeweller in Ayr. Every exertion was made to discover the robbers, but without effect. Last week, the Lady Hill of Ayr, on her passage from Dublin, was put into Loch Ryan by contrary winds; and, on being overhauled by the Custom-house officers, some smuggled starch was found in a trunk belonging to one of the sailors, of the name of Hamilton. In a concealed part of another chest, belonging to this, man, were found ten watches, of such an appearance as to raise a suspicion that they were not fairly come by. The man was apprehended, and, having made a full disclosure of his guilt, was committed for trial.

Source: The Edinburgh Magazine and Literary Miscellany - Volume 80 - Printed for Archibald Constable and Co. - 1817


Circuit Court of Justiciary - Ayr - 11th September 1817
William Hamilton, charged with breaking a shopwindow of Andrew Wallace, jeweller, Ayr, and stealing therefrom several watches, pled Guilty. The Depute Advocate, however, examined several witnesses, who proved the robbery. He was recommended to mercy. The Judge (Hermand) sentenced him to he hanged on 17th Octoher, at Ayr, but gave hopes that mercy might he extended to him.

Source: The Edinburgh Observer - 27th September 1817

Trev.

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Re: Scottish Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Thu Aug 08, 2013 5:53 am

MATTHEW COLQUHOUN

Ayr

There is a record of one goldsmith at least who wrought in Ayr, for his name - Matthew Colquhoun - is mentioned in a draft of the letter assigned to 1687, already referred to. A silver quaich bearing a maker's name-punch with these initials

Image

was exhibited at the International Exhibition, Glasgow, 1888, and it has been surmised that this may be his mark.


Source: Old Scottish Communion Plate - The Rev. Thomas Burns, F.R.S.E., F.S.A. Scot. - 1892


Matthew Colquhoun was apprenticed to the Glasgow silversmith, Thomas Moncur. After serving his term (five years), he is thought to have continued working as a journeyman to Moncur for a further two years. Matthew Colquhoun is thought to have worked in Ayr for the period 1682-1691, he is noted as serving as the Deacon and Deacon Convener in 1690-1691.

Trev.

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Re: Scottish Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Thu Aug 08, 2013 5:54 am

JOHN REEVEY

Ayr

Deaths:
At 188 Cowcaddens Street, on the 19th instant, Helen Bell, relict of John Reevey, Jeweller, Ayr.


Source: Glasgow Herald - 26th January 1870

Trev.

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Re: Scottish Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Thu Aug 08, 2013 5:55 am

ROBERT TEMPLETON

Ayr

Mr R. Templeton, Watchmaker and Jeweller of Ayr, who died a fortnight since, has bequeathed his whole estate, subject to the life-rent of three sisters, to rebuild the old bridge of that town, popularly known as 'Auld Brig o' Ayr', and rendered famous by Burn's poems. Mr. Templeton's estate is supposed to amount to about £10,000.

Source: Daily News - 21st February 1879

Trev.


MCB noted the following:

ROBERT TEMPLETON
He was born in Kilmarnock, Ayrshire around 1820.
The 1861 Census recorded him as a watch maker employing 2 apprentices and living in Kirkport, Ayr with his sister Catherine, the only information found for him.

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Re: Scottish Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Thu Aug 08, 2013 5:56 am

ROBERT McWHINNIE

Ayr

Circuit Intelligence

John Cassiday was the next person put to the bar; he was accused of breaking into the shop of Robert McWhinnie, Watchmaker in Ayr, and abstacting from therefrom the whole jewellery articles in the show box on the counter. He pleaded Not Guilty, and the jury returned a verdict unanimously finding the libel Not Proven, in consequence of which Cassiday was dismissed simpliciter from the bar.


Source: Caledonian Mercury - 26th April 1819

Trev.

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Re: Scottish Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Thu Aug 08, 2013 5:57 am

WALLACE ALLAN

Ayr

Marriages

Allan - Stewart, At Kirkmichael, on the 29th inst., by the Rev. Mr. Fairlie, Mr Wallace Allan, Jeweller, Ayr, to Agnes, daughter of Mr Wm. Stewart, Merchant, Kirkmichael.


Source: Glasgow Herald - 31st January 1880

Trev.


MCB noted the following:

WALLACE ALLAN
He was born in St Quivox, Ayr around 1848 the son of Robert a printer and his wife Margaret and was recorded in 1851 living with his parents at Wallace Street, Newton on Ayr.
In 1861 he was an apprentice watch maker living at Cross Street, Oswald Land, St Quivox living with David Oswald, a tailor and his wife Jane.
In 1871 he had served his time and was a watch maker living with his mother Margaret at 6 Steven Street, Glasgow Barony.
He was still recorded as a watch maker in 1881 with his wife Agnes and son aged 4 months at King Street, Kirkmichael, Ayrshire as lodgers of grocer William Stewart and his wife.
By 1891 they had 6 children aged from 3 weeks to 10 years. He remained a watch maker and lived with his wife, family and mother Margaret at Abbington Cottage, Ayr Road, Monkton and Prestwick, Ayrshire where they employed a general servant.
He had become a shopkeeper as well as a watch maker by 1901 and lived with his wife and their then 6 children at 4 Newmarket, Ayr. His son Robert aged 20 years had become a journeyman watch maker.
The 1901 Scottish Census is presently the last on line.


First in eight centuries

The Royal Burgh of Ayr has received its first civic mace in 758 years of history. Commissioned by Ayr Guildry, the mace is silver gilt. It was made in Birmingham and supplied by Wallace Allan of Ayr.


Source: Watchmaker, Jeweller & Silversmith - February 1960

Trev.

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Re: Scottish Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Thu Aug 08, 2013 5:58 am

ROBERT STEWART

Ayr

A Robert Stewart, Jeweller, Ayr, was noted as being an Elder at the Ayr Free Presbytery Church (Sandgate Free Church) in 1897.

Source: Glasgow Herald - 31st March 1897

Trev.


MCB noted the following:

ROBERT STEWART
He was born in Kilmarnock around 1848.
Entries for him on the Census records for 1851-1871 have not been found.
He was recorded on the 1881 Census as a watch maker and jeweller living at 30 Content Street, St Quivox, Ayr with his wife Jane and 3 children aged from 10 months to 4 years.
In 1891 he was listed in the same trade living with his wife and 5 children aged from 1-14 years at 4 Albert Terrace, Ayr where he employed a domestic servant. His son Robert aged 14 years was also employed in the same trade as his father.
He had moved to 4 Albert Place, Ayr by 1901 where he was a watch maker. He and his wife had another child aged 7 years. His son Thomas aged 22 years had joined him as a watch maker. A domestic servant was no longer employed.
The 1901 Scottish Census is presently the last on line.

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Re: Scottish Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Thu Aug 08, 2013 6:00 am

WILLIAM INGRAM

Ayr

Noted as a Watchmaker at Ayr in 1844, and 1853.


Scotch Sequestrations

William Ingram, Ayr, Watchmaker, Sept.7, at the Star Hotel, Ayr.


Source: The Morning Post - 2nd September 1874

Trev.


MCB noted the following:

WILLIAM INGRAM

William I
He was born Ayrshire around 1801.
He was listed on the 1841 Census as a watch maker living at Sea View, New Road, Newton on Ayr with his wife Mary and 4 children aged 9 to 19 years and was still there in 1851 as a watch maker where 3 of his sons had joined him in the same business. He remained a watch maker there in 1861 living with his wife. His sons had all left home.
There is no record of him on the 1871 Census
Edinburgh Assay Office lists William Ingram & Sons as watch and clockmakers and electroplaters in Ayr from 1860-67. This probably relates to William senior and sons.

William II
His son William born around 1825 was also a watch maker at New Road in 1861. He had married Margaret and they had 4 children aged 8 months to 8 years.
He was still at the same address and in the same trade in 1871. He and his wife had a further 4 children aged from 2 to 10 years. He had been joined as a watch maker by his son Durren aged 17 years.
The sequestration in 1874 mentioned in the preceding post probably relates to William II.
No further records for the family have been found in the UK.

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Re: Scottish Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Thu Aug 08, 2013 6:01 am

THOMAS JAMIESON

Ayr

Thomas Jamieson is recorded as a Clock and Watchmaker located at 79, High Street, Ayr, in 1837.

Source: Pigot and Co.'s National Commercial Directory of Scotland - James Pigot - 1837

Trev.


MCB noted the following:

THOMAS JAMIESON
He was born in Ayr around 1796.
He is listed on the 1841 Census record as a watch maker living in the High Street, Ayr with his wife Rebecca aged 30 years. They were still there in 1851 and 1861 when he was listed as a watch and clock maker.
Rebecca, with no occupation, was listed living at 1 Hope Street, Ayr in 1871 with a boarder named John Richmond, a newspaper reporter aged 79 years.There is no mention of Thomas.

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Re: Scottish Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Thu Aug 08, 2013 6:02 am

JAMES MURDOCH

Main Street, Newton, and Bridge Street, Ayr

James Murdoch is recorded as a Clock and Watchmaker located at Main Street, Newton, and Bridge Street, Ayr, in 1837.

Source: Pigot and Co.'s National Commercial Directory of Scotland - James Pigot - 1837

Trev.


MCB noted the following:

JAMES MURDOCH
He was born in Ayrshire around 1781.
He was recorded on the 1841 Census as a watch maker living with his wife Isabella, a watch maker named William Murdoch aged 25 years and 8 other people in property in Main Street, Newton on Ayr.
This is the last record found for him.

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Re: Scottish Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Thu Aug 08, 2013 6:04 am

WILLIAM SLIMEN

21, High Street, Ayr

William Slimen is recorded as a Clock and Watchmaker located at 21, High Street, Ayr, in 1837.

Source: Pigot and Co.'s National Commercial Directory of Scotland - James Pigot - 1837

Trev.

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Re: Scottish Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Thu Aug 08, 2013 6:05 am

JOHN TEMPLETON

204, High Street, Ayr

John Templeton is recorded as a Clock and Watchmaker located at 204, High Street, Ayr, in 1837.

Source: Pigot and Co.'s National Commercial Directory of Scotland - James Pigot - 1837

Trev.


MCB noted the following:

JOHN TEMPLETON
He may have been the John Templeton born in Ayr in 1821, recorded in the 1841 Census as a watch maker living in the High Street, Ayr with others with the same surname but as he would have been only 16 years old in 1837 when the entry was placed in Pigot’s 1837 Directory it suggests there may have been another John Templeton, probably his recently deceased father.
The younger John Templeton is recorded in the 1851 Census continuing as a watch maker at 147 High Street, Ayr and employing 3 men. He had married Marion and they had 4 children aged from 1-6 years. They also employed a domestic servant.
Marion Templeton had become the proprietor of both the watch making business and a house at 2 South Place, Midton Road, Ayr by 1861. She employed 1 man and a boy. He may have been her son Archibald who was listed as an apprentice watch maker. She had a further 2 children aged 5 and 9 years which provides a hint to the year her husband departed. She still employed a servant.

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Re: Scottish Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Thu Aug 08, 2013 6:06 am

THOMAS ARTHUR MORYSON

Ayr

Latest Wills

Moryson, Mr Thomas Arthur, of Ayr, Jeweller. Personal estate in England and Scotland, £57,577.


Source: The Times - 4th February 1964

Trev.


MCB noted the following:

THOMAS ARTHUR MORYSON
The England & Wales National Probate Calendar shows and that he died on 20th October 1963 and his last address was 4 Broomfield Gardens, Ayr. His Will was sealed for probate in London on 1st January 1964.

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Re: Scottish Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Thu Aug 08, 2013 6:12 am

MARSHALL

The Ayr Jewellery Robbery

In the course of some alterations in the celler, under the shop of Mr Marshall, Jeweller, Ayr, which was broken into recently, some of the missing goods were found burried under the floor. The articles were, however, not sterling, a jemmy was also found, and a waistcoat with fifty pockets. Mr Marshall's estimate of his loss, which is not insured, was £400.


Source: Aberdeen Weekly Journal - 17th November 1892


Box detail which is perhaps to be identified with the above:

Image
Alexander Marshall, 64, High Street, Ayr

Trev.

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Re: Scottish Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Thu Aug 08, 2013 6:18 am

ANDREW DAVIDSON

Arbroath

Andrew Davidson's working period was thought to have been 1835 - 1845.

He died at the age of 45 in 1846.

Example of the work and mark of Andrew Davidson:

Image

Image

Image

Image
AD - Crowned head - Crowned head - Portcullis

Example of the mark of Andrew Davidson:

Image
AD - Portcullis - AD


Trev.


MCB noted the following:

ANDREW DAVIDSON
He was born around 1801.
Pages 54-55 of A Directory of Scottish Provincial Makers & Their Marks by Richard W Turner lists Andrew Davidson in Arbroath from 1835-50 using 12 various marks all except one a combination of AD with portcullis or crowned heads one such appearing in the image in the previous post, the exception being AD with a ruined castle, a thistle, a gothic capital D and an oak tree.
Edinburgh Assay Office lists him in Arbroath from 1825-46 and identifies similar marks to those mentioned by Mr Turner but with additional use of a flower mark. Also listed is AD in a rectangle, presumably used for when he sent work to be assayed at that office.
He has also been attributed with using a mark at Edinburgh AO in 1841 comprising AD in a shield shape.
Pages 588-9 of Jackson’s Gold & Silver Marks list him in Arbroath in the same period identified by Mr Turner and using the combination of marks of AD with portcullis or crowned heads. A mark AD in a rectangle is also identified used in 1838-9 with the Edinburgh AO marks. The book also mentions Davidson using a Montrose rose and a Dundee pot of lilies which may identify his retailing of work made by others in those cities.
The 1841 UK Census listed him as a jeweller living with his wife Jane and two daughters aged 12 and 14 years at Ponderlaw, Arbroath, Inverbrothock. This is the last Census record found for him.
Edinburgh AO notes that he died in 1845.

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Re: Scottish Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Thu Aug 08, 2013 6:38 am

GEORGE BLACK

Arbroath


ARBROATH

Silver Bracelet

At the present time there is to be seen in the shop window of Mr Black, Clock and Watchmaker, High Street, a most elaborately chased silver bracelet, found some time ago, covered in oxide, in the garden of Balmadies, which has been cleansed by Mr Black, and is well worthy the inspection of the curious. The chasing is of both animal and floral design, and is evidently of oriental workmanship.


Source: Dundee Courier and Daily Argus - 25th April 1861

Trev.


MCB noted the following:

GEORGE BLACK
He was born in Barry, Forfarshire around 1818.
Page 589 of Jackson’s book lists him in Arbroath from 1860.
Edinburgh AO lists him as a jeweller, watch and clock maker there from 1860-67. No maker’s mark is identified for him.
No entry has been found for him on the 1841 UK Census.
He is shown in the 1851 Census as a watch and clock maker employing 1 man and living at Greenlaw Cross, Brechin with his wife Ann, 3 of their children aged 2-6 years, a female servant aged 13 years and John Bridgford a journeyman watch maker, presumably the employed man.
He was listed as George A Black in 1861 living at 25 Hill Street, Arbroath with his wife and 6 children aged from 8 months-13 years. He still employed a servant. From the listed places of birth of his children he had moved to Arbroath around 1856.
He was with his wife and 6 children at 16 West Keptie Street, Arbroath in 1871, still in the same trade.
By 1881 he was living at East Roods, Kirriemuir with his wife and 3 of their children. Along with his sons James and Samuel he was listed as a watch maker, the last record found for him.

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Re: Scottish Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Thu Aug 08, 2013 6:40 am

ALEXANDER GLENNY

Arbroath


Marriages

At Arbroath, on the 29th ultimo, by the Rev. Mr. Sorley, Mr Wm. Christison, Clothier, to Christina, daughter of Mr Alexander Glenny, Jeweller, Arbroath.


Source: Dundee Courier - 13th October 1852

Trev.


MCB noted the following:

ALEXANDER GLENNY
He was born in Benholm, Kincardineshire around 1802.
Page 589 of Jackson’s book shows him in Arbroath from 1856 and as Alexander Glenny and Co from 1860.
Edinburgh AO have the same listing for 1860 but no individual entry.
He appears as jeweller Alexander Glenney in the 1841 UK Census living in High Street, Dunottar
The 1861 UK Census recorded him as a master watch maker living at High Street, Broughtover, Arbroath with his wife Clementina and son David who was born in Dunottar around 1832 and also a watch maker.
He was listed in 1871 as a jeweller living with his wife at 97 Hill Street, Arbroath, the last record found for him.

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Re: Scottish Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Thu Aug 08, 2013 6:41 am

JAMES HUTTON

Arbroath


Sales by Auction

P. Burn & Co., beg to intimate that they are instructed by Messrs. McCubbin & Johnston, Accountants, South Frederick Street, to sell the whole valuable stock of jewellery, etc., belonging to the sequestrated estate of Mr James Hutton, Jeweller, Arbroath. Catalogues may be had on application. Sale to begin at twelve o'clock. P. Burn & Co., Auctioneers, 9, Exchange Place, Glasgow. - 30th Dec. 1857.


Source: Glasgow Herald - 30th December 1857

Trev.


MCB noted the following:

JAMES HUTTON
He was born in Dundee around 1829.
He does not appear on the Edinburgh AO website.
He is shown as a watch maker and weaver in the 1851 UK Census lodging at Hill Terrace, Arbroath with hand loom linen weaver Robert Mathers and his family.
Following the events of 1857 mentioned in the previous post he returned to Dundee where he is listed in 1861 as a watch maker living at 205 Overgate with his wife Mary. He continued to be recorded as a watch maker there in 1871 and in the same trade in Glasgow in 1881, the last entry found for him.

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Re: Scottish Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Thu Aug 08, 2013 6:43 am

JAMES CHRISTIE

Arbroath


James Christie is noted as being a member of the 'Edinburgh Angus Club'

Edinburgh Angus Club

James Christie - Jeweller, Arbroath.

Source: The Dundee Courier & Argus - 16th October 1869.

Trev.


MCB noted the following:

JAMES CHRISTIE
He was born in Tannadice, Forfarshire around 1836 the son of John and Elizabeth.
The 1841 UK Census recorded him living with his parents at The Abbey, Arbroath where his father was a publican.
He was still with them in Abbey Street, Arbroath in 1851 aged 15 years and already a watch maker.
He does not appear on the Edinburgh AO website.
Page 589 of Jackson’s book shows Barrie and Christie in Arbroath in 1860. There is a separate biography for George Barrie following.
He was listed in the 1861 UK Census as a watch maker employing 2 men and 2 boys living with his mother Elizabeth and siblings at 10 Academy Street, Arbroath. His brother George aged 15 years was an apprentice watch maker.
He was a watch maker employing 4 men and a boy in 1871 living at 147 High Street, Arbroath with his wife Margaret and 2 children aged 10 months and 2 years.
Margaret and 6 children aged from 4-12 years were at 3 Colvill Place, Arbroath in 1881 where she was shown as a watch maker’s wife. Her husband does not appear with them and no mention of him or later record of his family has been found.


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