Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

For information you'd like to share - Post it here - not for questions
dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40664
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Tue Mar 17, 2015 7:21 am

F. DAUS

Leipzig


Image
F. Daus - Leipzig - 1879

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40664
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Mon Mar 30, 2015 10:36 am

ROBERT SMITH & Co.

Beech Street, Barbican, London


Image
R. Smith & Co. - London - 1865

Thought to be in business from c.1850 until c.1896. Partners included Robert Albert Smith, John Smith, and Walter Fisher.


Robert Smith & Co. entered four marks with the London Assay Office, 'R.S' (Robert Smith) contained within an oblong punch, on the 10th December 1879, 'J.S' (John Smith) contained within an oblong punch, on the 1st October 1887, 'WF' (Walter Fisher) contained within an oblong punch, on the 30th October 1889, and 'WF' contained within an oblong punch, on the 17th January 1890.

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40664
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Tue Mar 31, 2015 7:17 am

CHARLES PILSON

1, Corn Exchange, Cambridge


Image
Charles Pilson - Cambridge - 1867

Image
C. Pilson - Cambridge - 1878

Image
C. Pilson - Cambridge - 1881

Established in 1828.

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40664
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Sun May 03, 2015 2:37 pm

LUXENBERG & HASKELL

122, Centre Street and 1161-1165, Broadway, New York


Image
Luxenberg & Haskell - New York - 1911

Image
Luxenberg & Haskell - New York - 1913

Albert Ostheimer, mentioned in the above advertisement, was formerly in charge of the cane department at the New York salesroom of the Harvey & Watts Co.

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40664
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Fri May 22, 2015 7:37 am

CLOGG, WRIGHT & Co.

New York


The limited partnership formed in October 1898. by L. H. Clogg, B. O. Wright and George Peck, to manufacture and deal in umbrellas, canes, etc., under the style of Clogg, Wright & Co., has been continued from March 1 to August 1 next. George Peck, the special partner, contributes $25,000 to the capital of the firm.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 15th March 1899

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40664
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Mon May 25, 2015 2:26 am

BINGHAMTON WHIP COMPANY

70-80, Whitney Street, Binghamton, New York


Image
Binghamton Whip Company - Binghamton, N.Y. - 1900

Image
Binghamton Whip Company - Binghamton, N.Y. - 1908

Image
Binghamton Whip Company - Binghamton, N.Y. - 1920

The business of Lucius Woodruff (b.23-2-1845, Windsor, New York, - d.19-10-1932, Binghamton, New York)

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40664
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Sat May 30, 2015 8:29 am

GUILLAUME GIMBRERE

Tilburg, Netherlands


Image
Guillaume Gimbrere - Tilburg - 1918

Established in 1886.

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40664
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Mon Jun 01, 2015 4:47 am

K. HIRADE & Co.

Seattle, U.S.A. and Kobe, Japan


Image
K. Hirade & Co. - Seattle and Kobe - 1918

Established at Seattle in 1890.

Established at Kobe in 1893.

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40664
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Wed Jun 10, 2015 7:04 am

NEWARK RIVET WORKS

262-263, Lafayette Street, Newark, New Jersey


Image
Newark Rivet Works - Newark, N.J. - 1904

Image
Newark Rivet Works - Newark, N.J. - 1908

Users of the trade marks 'TRIMPI' and 'NWR'.

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40664
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Thu Jun 11, 2015 1:13 pm

H.M. MUSSER

396, Broadway, later, 24, East 21st Street, New York, and Lancaster, Pennsylvania

Image
H. Musser - New York and Lancaster, Pa. - 1911

Image
H. Musser - New York and Lancaster, Pa. - 1922

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40664
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Sat Jun 13, 2015 8:19 am

THE LANCASTER SILVER PLATE Co.

89, Franklin Street, New York and Lancaster, Pennsylvania


Image
The Lancaster Silver Plate Co. - New York and Lancaster, Pa. - 1901

A. Rosenstein - President
H.Z. Rhoads - Treasurer


The umbrella handle factory of the Lancaster Silver Plate Co., Lancaster, Pa., was destroyed by fire November 17. causing a loss of about $35,000 on stock and machinery, and $15,000 on the buildings.

Source: Trunks, Leather Goods and Umbrellas - December 1903


The Lancaster Silver Plate Co., whose handle factory was totally destroyed by fire, has purchased the plant of the Earle & Granger Mfg. Co., and the building will be fitted up as rapidly as possible. They expect to have the spring line, which had just been finished on the evening of the fire, in readiness within a short time.

Source: Trunks, Leather Goods and Umbrellas - December 1903

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40664
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Mon Jun 15, 2015 6:31 am

Walking Canes

The horrible habit of Americans of putting their hands in their pockets has led to the popularity of canes in this country. The Japanese gentleman shows appreciation to the same feeling when his costume is incomplete—without his shutting fan, which he hangs at his belt, over his right shoulder or in the breast folds of his silken gown. The French or English gentleman for the same reason never attends a full dress party without his crush hat in his hand.

The fashion of carrying canes, however, among the swells and lah-de dah lads of New York has each season its rules, which are observed with as much exquisite punctilio as those of ladies who wear a poke bonnet one year and scoop hat the next. Most of these fashions originate in Europe. A year or two ago there were two styles—the shepherd's crook, shaped like a fishhook, and the Zulu crook, a plain, curved handle. The Zulu came from Paris, the shepherd from London. These styles in canes were introduced in the spring and were preceded by the crutch. When our fathers were lads the whalebone cane was the proper thing. Now they are so scarce that they are worth to the dealer from $3 to $3.50. Last year the fashion was to carry a silver ball cane. Then there is a style in carrying a cane and this varies each year. One year it was to walk with a spring gait, with bent knees and arms akimbo as far forward as possible, and the cane was held between one finger and thumb, correctly balanced so as to swing gracefully. Then came the aesthetic style. The cane was held in front of the body by the first and second fingers of both hands and was allowed to hang limp, while the elbows were still further forward and the shoulders, if possible, more round. Then there was a fashion last year of holding the ferule down. This year it is to hold it in the middle with the ferule to the front, just as Mr. Spot Dandridge does after his return from the East. That's the proper " caper."

The material is as various as can well nigh be conceived of. Many are of imported woods: some from the tropics, China and the East Indies. The celebrated Whongee canes are from China, where they are well known and celebrated for the regularity of their joints which are the points from which the leaves are given off, and the stems of a species of phyllosiachys, a gigantic grass closely allied to the bamboo. The orange and lemon are highly prized and are imported chiefly from the West Indies, and perfect specimens command enormous prices. The orange stick is known by its beautiful green bark, with fine white longitudinal markings, and the lemon by the symmetry of its proportions and both prominence and regularity of its knots. Myrtle sticks possess also a value, since their appearance is so peculiar that their owner would seldom fail to recognize them. They are imported from Algeria. The rajah stick is an importation. It is the stem of a palm and a species of calamus. It is grown in Borneo, and takes its name from the fact that the rajah will not allow any to go out of the country unless a heavy duty is paid. These canes, known as palm canes, are distinguished by an angular and more or less flat appearance. Their color is brownish, spotted, and they are quite straight with neither knob nor curl. They are the petioles of leaf stalks of the date palm. Perhaps the most celebrated of the foreign canes are the Malacca, being the stems of the calamus sceptonum, a slender climbing palm, and not growing about Malacca as the name would seem to indicate, but imported from Stak on the opposite coast of Sumatra. Other foreign canes are of ebony, rosewood, partridge, or hairwood and cactus, which, when the pith is cut out, present a most novel appearance, hollow and full of holes.

The manufacture of canes is by no means the simple process of cutting the sticks in the woods, peeling off the bark, whittling down the knots, sandpapering the rough surface, and adding a touch of varnish, a curiously carved handle or head, and tipping the end with a ferule. In the sand flats of New Jersey whole families support themselves by gathering nanneberry sticks, which they gather in the swamps, straighten with an old vise, steam over an old kettle and perhaps scrape down or whittle into size. These are packed in large bundles to New York city and sold to the cane factories. Many imported sticks, however, have to go through a process of straightening by mechanical means, which are a mystery to the uninitiated. They are buried in hot sand until they become pliable. In front of the heap of hot sand in which the sticks are plunged is astoutboaid from five to six feet long, fixed at an angle inclined to the workman, and having two or more notches cut in the edge When the stick has become perfectly pliable the workman places it on one of the notches, and, bending it in the opposite direction to which it is naturally bent, straightens it. Thus, sticks apparently crooked, bent, warped and worthless are by this simple process straightened; but the most curious part of the work is observed in the formation of the crook or curl for the handles which are not naturally supplied with a hook or knob. The workman places one end of the cane firmly in a vise, and pours a continuous stream of fire from a gas pipe on the part which is to be bent. When sufficient heat has been applied, the cane is pulled slowly and gradually round until the hook is completely formed and then secured with a string. An additional application of heat serves to bake and permanently fix the curl. The under part of the handle is frequently charred by the action of the gas, and this is rubbed down with sandpaper until the requisite degree of smoothness is attained.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - July 1884

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40664
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Fri Jun 26, 2015 1:19 pm

SCHWARTZ & GERZ

235, West Grant Street, Lancaster, Pennsylvania


Schwartz and Gerz, of 235 West Grant street, make umbrella handles of Brittania and white metal, plated, advertising novelties, manicure sets, etc. They expect to enlarge on the manicure line and also will make cutlery. They do designing for large silverware manufacturers.

Source: The Metal Industry - September 1913

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40664
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Fri Jul 03, 2015 2:44 pm

JAMES McCREERY & Co.

Broadway and 11th Street, New York


Image
James McCreery & Co. - New York - 1894

Image
James McCreery & Co. - New York - 1894

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40664
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Fri Jul 17, 2015 12:21 pm

SUPLEE, REEVE, WHITING Co.

823-825, Filbert Street, Philadelphia and 434-438, Broadway, later 142, Fifth Avenue, New York


Image
Suplee, Reeve, Whiting Co. - Philadelphia and New York - 1901

Image
Suplee, Reeve, Whiting Co. - Philadelphia and New York - 1914

Image
Suplee, Reeve, Whiting Co. - 1914

Image
Suplee, Reeve, Whiting Co. - 1914

Successors to Belknap, Johnson & Powell.

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40664
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Mon Jul 20, 2015 4:30 am

MORGENSTERN & GOLDSMITH

135, Grand Street, New York


Image
Morgenstern & Goldsmith - New York - 1904


On an exportation by Morgenstern & Goldsmith of umbrella, parasol and cane handles the Treasury Department last week allowed rebates on imported materials used in making the articles.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 20th February 1907

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40664
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Mon Jul 20, 2015 4:44 am

FRED. M. WILLIAMS

128, Ocean Parkway, Brooklyn, and Flatbush, Long Island


Image
Fred. M. Williams - Brooklyn - 1904

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40664
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Fri Oct 30, 2015 3:57 pm

FRANKFORD BROTHERS - FRANKFORD Mfg. Co.

1238, Poplar Street, later, 906, Filbert Street, Philadelphia


Image
Frankford Bros. - Philadelphia - 1914

Image
Frankford Bros. - Philadelphia - 1916

Image
Frankford Mfg. Co. - Philadelphia - 1922

Image
Frankford Mfg. Company - Philadelphia - 1923

Established in 1908 by Samuel and Benjamin Frankford, who took over the umbrella business of Albert H. Regul & Co., who had been located at the Poplar Street address for 33 years.

Users of the trade names: 'FRANCO' and 'STAND TEST'.

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40664
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Sun Nov 01, 2015 12:13 pm

GANS BROTHERS

97, Fifth Avenue, New York, and, 100, Hanover Street, Baltimore


Image
Gans Brothers - Baltimore - 1915

Image
Gans Brothers - Baltimore - 1916

Gans Bros, 100 Hanover street, Baltimore, umbrella and parasol manufacturers, have filed articles of incorporation papers. The company will have a capital stock of $200,000, divided into 2000 shares of the par value of $100 each. The officers and directors are Charles Gans, president; Williams Gans. vice-president; Max Gans, treasurer; Henry W. C. Meyer, secretary, and Moses G. Gans.

Source: Trunks, Leather Goods and Umbrellas - August 1916

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40664
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Sun Nov 08, 2015 1:24 pm

G. RAU

Pforzheim


Image
G. Rau - Pforzheim - 1902

Established by Gustav Rau in 1877.

See: viewtopic.php?f=38&t=19352&p=92955&hilit=rau#p92955

Trev.


Return to “Contributors' Notes”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests

cron