Some London Advertisements and Information

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Wed Apr 09, 2014 8:26 am

EDWIN HARROP

1, Amwell Street, Clerkenwell, later 109-119, Roseberry Avenue, Clerkenwell, London, and 9, Castlereagh Street, Sydney

The business of Edwin George Harrop had its origins in the firm of G.,E. & F. Harrop that was established at Clerkenwell by at least 1836. Edwin George Harrop appears to have succeeded to the business in c.1895. His firm manufactured a great variety of jewellery, but was most well-known for his invention of the Britannic expanding watch bracelet that he was granted a patent for in 1907.


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1912


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1914


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1922


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1933

Edwin Harrop was noted as exhibiting at the Jewellers' Exhibition of 1912 and 1913. He died on the 17th January 1936, aged 74 years.

The business entered its marks 'EH' contained within an oblong punch, on the 2nd January 1896, 'E.H' contained within an oblong punch, on the 22nd May 1911, and similar, on the 4th May 1914.

The business was acquired by Netonia Ltd. (E.B. Eustance) in 1952 (Source: Watchmaker, Jeweller & Silversmith - February 1959)

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Fri Apr 11, 2014 9:31 am

RONALD CARTER

An example of the work of Ronald George Carter, a cake slice, 8½" (21.5 cm) in length and weighing 45 grams, assayed at London in 1977:


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RGC - London - 1977

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sat Apr 12, 2014 10:27 am

BENJAMIN LEE

41, Rathbone Place, later, 9, Baker Street, Portman Square, London


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B. Lee - London - 1851

Noted as an exhibitor at the Great Exhibition of 1851, and at the International Exhibition of 1862.

Benjamin Lee was noted as a victim of a robbery in 1869 at 9, Baker Street, losing between £500 and £600 worth of stock.

There appears to be no assay office registrations for Benjamin Lee.

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Mon Apr 14, 2014 3:08 pm

JOHN ELKAN

35, Liverpool Street, and 70, Leadenhall Street, and 26, Broadwalk, Harrow, London


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John Elkan - London - 1915


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John Elkan - London - 1936

Established in 1873.

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Wed Apr 16, 2014 2:06 pm

KIGU Ltd.

Waldo Works, Waldo Road, London


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Kigu Ltd. - London - 1958


Trade marks used by Kigu Ltd.:

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Image and the trade name 'KIGUMATIC' (registered 25th October 1962).

The business of R.D. Kiashek.

Noted associated companies of Kigu Ltd. include, CRYSO-PRESTA JEWELLERY Ltd., and CAPRICE COMPACTS Ltd.

Kigu Ltd. entered their mark 'KLD' contained within an elliptical shaped punch, with the London Assay Office.

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Thu Apr 17, 2014 9:25 am

S.B. SCHLESINGER & Co.Ltd.

59-61, Hatton Garden, London


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S.B. Schlesinger & Co.Ltd. - London - 1958

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Fri Apr 18, 2014 2:25 pm

SANDERS & Co.Ltd.

458-460, Brixton Road, and Oxford Street, Kensington, Streatham, Lewisham, and Peckham


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Sanders & Co.Ltd. - London - 1913


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Sanders & Co.Ltd. - London - 1914

Sanders & Co.Ltd. entered their mark 'S & Co' contained within a hexagonal punch, on the 1st October 1913, and a similar mark on the 9th January 1915, both with the Chester Assay Office.

In 1913, H. Hussey was noted as Secretary.

In 1915, William Wetherell was noted as a director.

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sun Apr 20, 2014 8:31 am

L.P. HOLZER Ltd.

519, Ulster Chambers, 168, Regent Street, London


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L.P. Holzer Ltd. - London - 1959

L.P. Holzer Ltd. were struck off the Companies Register in 1977.

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Tue Apr 22, 2014 12:52 pm

B.T. BURLTON

59, Cheapside, London


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B.T. Burlton - London - 1872

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Thu Apr 24, 2014 7:12 am

ROWLANDS & FRAZER

92, Quadrant, Regent Street, and 146, Regent Street, and 28a, Warwick Street, London


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Rowlands & Frazer - London - 1894

Established in the first half of the 19th century by Christopher Rowlands, the business was later, by 1841, styled as Christopher Rowlands & Son, located at 92, Quadrant, Regent Street, and 146, Regent Street. During the 1850's the business was run by William Broad Rowlands, Donald Rowlands, and Arthur Rowlands, in partnership as W.B., D. & A. Rowlands. Following the retirement of Donald Rowlands, the firm's name was restyled to W.B.& A. Rowlands, and by the late 1850's to Rowlands, Rowlands & Frazer following Thomas Henry Frazer joining the partnership. The business named was restyled yet again in 1860 following the retirement of William Broad Rowlands, the final name change being that to Rowlands & Frazer.

The firm of Rowlands & Frazer continued in business until 1902 when Arthur Rowlands retired. Thomas Frazer continued alone, trading under the same name until late 1905/early 1906 when the business was finally closed. The remainder of the firm's stock was sold at Christie's in February 1906 and the business acquired by Bert & Co. of Vigo Street, Regent Street.

Christopher Rowlands & Son were noted as exhibitors at the Great Exhibition of 1851.

Rowlands & Frazer entered their marks 'HF' ([Thomas?] Henry Frazer) contained within an oblong punch with clipped corners, with the London Assay Office, on the 22nd January 1890, 1st April 1895, and 6th January 1897.

A similar mark to the above was entered with the Sheffield Assay Office on the 24th July 1897.

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sat Apr 26, 2014 10:22 am

THE WATCHMAKERS' ALLIANCE and ERNEST GOODE'S STORES

70, Chancery Lane, and 184, Oxford Street, London


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Ernest Goode's Stores - London - 1895

"FOOLS AND THEIR MONEY."
Various attempts are being made by enterprising persons in England and elsewhere to exploit the colonies when they find the supply of gulls running short in the Mother Country. It is well, therefore, that our readers should be on their guard. A correspondent draws our attention to circulars, which are being distributed broadcast in New Zealand by "the Watchmakers' Alliance and Ernest Goode's Stores, Limited," and asks us to give some information as to the standing and operations of the firm. In reply, we may say that both have been attacked by Mr. Labouchere, in "Truth,"' in the most scathing terms, and although the prime mover in the concern has been challenged to bring an action for libel he has refrained from doing so. In the circular forwarded by our correspondent, three simple arithmetical problems are set. To persons who solve one, a "solid gold pearl ring" is promised; to those who solve two, a "solid gold diamond ring"; and to those who solve all three, a "£750 freehold house," of which an attractive picture is given. The indispensable condition, however, is attached that the solver must first buy from the Watchmakers' Alliance one of their watches, which they claim to have been selling wholesale at £2 10s each, but which they generously offer to sell to those who enter for the competition at the "startling reduction of 35s each." In regard to the house, we may say that it was offered months ago in all parts of England; that it was avowedly awarded to hundreds of persons who fulfilled the conditions; and that, so far as we can ascertain, it is still in the possession of Mr. Ernest Goode. The excuse given by the Chairman of the Company for not awarding the prize was that the Company were obliged to keep the list open until answers had been received from competitors in distant parts of the world. It is not improbable that the hundreds of claimants will then have swollen to thousands, and our readers may form their own conclusions as to how much of the £750 house is likely to fall to the share of each lucky New Zealander who solves the sums set by Mr. Goode. For our part, we shall esteem him fortunate if he gets so much as a brick off the chimney. As to the watch, which is set forth as such an astonishing bargain at 35s, Mr. Labouchere states that it has been valued at a number of different establishments, and the valuations range from about 12s to 23s. It could, therefore, be sold quite easily at a profit at 25s. There are other offers in the circular, all based on the same principle. It is, of course, difficult to understand how people are ever foolish enough to part with their money on such representations. Common sense would tell them that a business firm, even with the high-sounding title of the Watchmakers' Alliance is not likely to be formed for the purpose of distributing freehold houses and diamond rings among deserving colonists, whose only claim to such reward is that they are able to solve sums such as are set to boys in the fourth standard of our public schools. Yet the adage of the Tichborne claimant, about the people with money and no brains being made for the people with brains and no money, must be of wide application. Otherwise, we should not find Mr. Ernest Goode, alias Cochrane, who was a few years ago an advertising clerk at about £3 a week, now flourishing as the prime mover in the concern known as the Watchmakers' Alliance, claiming to have a paid-up capital and reserve of £97,500, besides being the proprietors of "a London Bank." As they are already so well off, we think they can do very well without any assistance from New Zealand.


Source: The Press - 14th December 1898


THE " WATCHMAKERS' ALLIANCE."
Since we wrote about the Watchmakers' Alliance and its offer of a freehold house to the competitor who guessed a ridiculously easy puzzle and bought certain goods from the Alliance, there has been a further development. We pointed out that the house had already been submitted to competition in England, and a number of people had claimed it, and we wanted to know where the New Zealand competitors, if successful, would come in. We are still anxious for information on this latter point. In the latest number of "Truth,'' just to hand, Mr. Labouchere states that the famous " freehold property," No.14 Powis Gardens, Bayswater, has been allotted out among the competitors in Ernest Goode's great competition. The Watchmakers' Alliance and Ernest Goode's Stores, Limited, are now forwarding to the successful competitors a plan of the property, divided into 1200 equal plots. The measurement of the freehold being 60ft by 17ft, the portion allotted to each individual freeholder is about 18in by 7in, and the apportionment of rent to each plot is one per annum. There is little question that the pointed criticisms in " Truth " have had the effect of bringing the Alliance up to the mark. In the first instance, the competition was to be kept open until next June. Instead of that the Board of Directors thought fit to close it on October 17th, and they have evidently made all possible haste to get out the marked plan and wind the thing up. Considering that 1200 freeholders have been created up to October 17th, and that the scheme has in the meantime been widely advertised throughout the British Empire, it is pretty certain, as Mr. Labouchere points out, that had the thing been running till next June, the 1200 would have been considerably multiplied, and that the valuable annuity at one shilling per annum, which the competitors have now secured, would have been proportionately reduced. But what about those who have responded to the invitations to enter the competition since October 17th, including the New Zealanders who have been taken in by the scheme? Mr. Goode, otherwise Cochrane, makes to these the following offer: –

"As there was a very considerable number of ties for the first prize, it is quite a moot point whether the second prize of a solid gold diamond ring is not of equal or greater value than the proportion assigned to each of the ties in the first prize, and accordingly we shall be glad to know whether you would like to accept the second prize, in which case, on your forwarding 35s, you will receive the Watch as promised in our advertisement (No. 2001, page 8 on catalogue enclosed), and the Gold Diamond Ring, always on the distinct understanding that if you do not like the goods sent, you are at liberty to return the Watch and Ring forthwith and have the 35s refunded. . .''

The freehold plots allotted as the first prize are valued at 24s each (i.e., twenty-four years' purchase of the rent of 1s per annum). So that (Mr. Labouchere continues) it is "a moot point" whether the " solid gold diamond, ring " is not actually worth the sum of 24s. On this basis, parties who have won the first prize are told that they may just as well pay their 35s and take the second. If they don't agree to that, they are told that it is possible that later on the Company may be able to offer them one of the freehold conveyances rejected by the more fortunate winners of the first prize who have received that precious document. Failing that alternative, we are not told what is to happen, Cochrane's power of invention having failed him at that point. In a circular which he has addressed to winners of the second prize ("gold diamond ring"), Mr. Goode says that having won it, they will receive it on purchasing at the price of 35s the "lever watch." Mr. Labouchere, having been appealed to, opines that it is a toss up whether the gold ring or the freehold plot at 1s a year rent is the more valuable. £1 4s is probably a handsome valuation for either, and it may also be "a moot point" whether the lever watch is worth the balance of 11s, which the prize-winner will have to pay up before he becomes the possessor of the two articles at 35s. Mr. Labouchere's advice, therefore, to those (whether first or second prize-winners), who have not yet paid their 35s, is "Don't." To those who have paid it, his advice is, to close at once with Goode's offer, and get their money back. We do not agree with Mr. Labouchere's views as a rule, but in this, matter we think he speaks the words of soberness and wisdom.


Source: The Press - 6th January 1899



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Box detail.


The WATCHMAKERS ALLIANCE AND ERNEST GOODES STORES Limited.

NOTICE is hereby given, in pursuance of section 142 of the Companies Act, 1862, that a General Meeting of the Members of the above named Company will be held at 11, Great Titchfield-street, W., on Wednesday, the 8th June, 1904, at 5 o'clock in the afternoon, for the purpose of having an account laid efore them, showing the manner in which the winding up has been conducted and the property of the Company disposed of, and of hearing any explanation that may be given by the Liquidators; and also of determining, by Extraordinary Resolution, the manner in which the books, accounts, and documents of the Company, and of the Liquidators thereof, shall be disposed of.–Dated this 4th of May, 1904.
FRANK L. TAINTER
HENRY GREEN - Joint Liquidators


Source: The London Gazette - 6th May 1904


Not to be confused with the business of Edward Good (see above post) at New Oxford Street, London

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sun Apr 27, 2014 11:25 am

GALVANIC RING Co.

Kew, London


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Galvanic Ring Co. - London - 1913

Products marked 'GRC'.

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Tue Apr 29, 2014 7:58 am

E. MILLARD

6, Lisle Street, Leicester Square, London


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E. Millard - London - 1877

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Wed Apr 30, 2014 2:08 pm

JOHN DOBREE

VICE-CHANCELLOR'S COURT.–July 22.

Reddel V. Dobree.

Mr. Jacob and Mr. Swinburne appeared in support of a demurrer in this case. The bill disclosed the following singular facts:–Mr. John Dobree, who was a retired silversmith, and a widower, living alone at Brixton, formed a strong attachment for the plaintiffs, Charlotte Reddel and Allison Kyle Reddel. In the autumn of 1837 he had a cash-box made with a Bramah lock, and to the key attached a bone label, on which Miss Reddel's name was inscribed. On the 10th of September he gave her the box, and, as the bill alleged, accompanied the gift with these words :–" At my death go to my son and ask him for the key, which will be found in the iron chest. If he will not give it up, take the box to Vaughan. It contains money, take care of it. It will make hundreds difference to you. It is for yourself and your sister, and entirely at your own disposal after I am gone; but I shall want it from you every three months while I live." It appeared from the bill that Vaughan, who was one of the defendants, and had formerly been Mr. Dobree's partner, and was also considerably indebted to him, was the person employed by Mr. Dobree to obtain the cash-box. When the box was delivered to the plaintiff she was ignorant of its contents, and upon Vaughan shortly after asking her "whether she did not wish to know what the old gentleman had left her," she objected to receive any information about the matter. In the month of December following, Mr. Dobree called upon Miss Reddel on his road to town, and took away the box, which, however, he redelivered to her on the same day as he returned. In March, 1838, he paid the plaintiff another visit; she was absent from home, and left word that she should bring the box to his house. In compliance with this message, she took the box to his house, and received it again in a few days. Mr. Dobree died on the 1st of June, 1838, leaving a son and daughter, and by his will left the iron chest to his son, whom he also appointed his residuary legatee. After Mr. Dobree s death, the plaintiff made an application to the defendant, his son, for the key, but on his refusal to give it up she had the box broken open, and found therein two envelopes, one of which was directed to herself, and contained a draught on Ransom, and dated April 2, drawn by Vaughan for £500. payable to John Dobree or bearer, and another draught of the same date for £200. for her sister. When the draughts were presented to Messrs. Ransom and Co. the payment was refused, and then Miss Reddel filed the present bill against Vaughan, the drawer of the checks, and also against Dobree as the residuary legatee of the testator. Among the allegations in the bill it was stated that several small boxes of the same kind as that given to the plaintiff were made at different times by the direction of Mr. Dobree, and presented to various persons. The bill also alleged, that the two draughts found in the envelopes after the testator's death, were placed there in the room of two similar draughts which the box contained when it was first delivered to Miss Reddel. It was further alleged, that the defendants set up a pretence that the draughts were made on the 1st of April, which being a Sunday, the instruments were illegal, and could not be sued upon. In answer to this the plaintiff alleged that the defendant had been informed by Mr. Dobree, during his lifetime, of his intention to make a provision for herself and sister and that even if the case were as they pretended, the whole was a fraudulent scheme to defeat his intention and deprive them of the enjoyment of his bounty. The learned counsel contended, in support of the demurrer, that a case of donatio mortis causa' could not be supported by the bill.

Mr. K. Bruce and Mr. Anderdon appeared in support of the bill.

The Vice-chancellor said, the case appeared to him to be quite a mistake. There certainly was not in his opinion a donatio mortis causa', or anything like it, but merely a gift of what might happen to be in the box at the time of the testator's death, and which of course was always liable to he recalled. His Honour could not but think the testator meant all along to retain complete dominion over the box, and that it was only an accident that he died so shortly after the last delivery of it to the plaintiff. That, however, could not vary the nature and constitution of the case. His Honour was of opinion that at the utmost the plaintiff held the box upon trust for the testator himself, and if not in favour of himself, then for the holder. Such a trust, however, the Court could not entertain a jurisdiction over, and therefore the demurrer must be allowed.


Source: The Legal Guide - Volume 2 - L. Houghton - 1839

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sat May 03, 2014 10:57 am

WILLIAM HENRY BRACE

London

WILLIAM HENRY BRACE, Deceased. Pursuant to the Act of Parliament 220d and 23rd Victoria, chapter 35, intituled “An Act to further amend the Law of Property, and to relieve Trustees. NOTICE is hereby given, that all creditors and other persons having any claims or demands against the estate of William Henry Brace, of 152, St. John street-road, and 22, Baalbec-road, Highbury, in the county of London, Gold and Silversmith, deceased (who died on the 22nd day of September, 1902, and whose will was proved in the Principal Registry of the Probate Division of His Majesty’s High Court of Justice on the 6th day of November, 1902, by Tom Robert Grace, of 52, Park-road, Southend-on-Sea, and Matthew Henry Hale, of Bedford-row-chambers, 42, Theobald's-road, London, W.C., the executors therein named), are hereby required to send the particulars, in writing, of their claims or demands to me, the undersigned, the Solicitor for the said executors, on or before the 7th day of March next, after which date the said executors will proceed to distribute the assets of the said deceased amongst the persons entitled thereto, having regard only to the claims and demands of which they shall then have bad notice; and they will not be liable for the assets of the said deceased, or any part thereof, so distributed to any person or persons of whose claims or demands they shall not then have had notice–Dated this 2nd day of February, 1903.
MATTHEW H. HALE, Bedford~row-chambers, 42, Theobald's-road, W.C., Solicitor for the said Executors.


Source: The London Gazette - 6th February 1903

The above details may refer to the William Brace who registered his mark 'W.B' contained within an oblong punch, with the London Assay Office on the 9th October 1885.

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sat May 17, 2014 1:42 pm

ROBERT STONE

An example of the work and mark of Robert Edgar Stone. A bowl in the form of a five-petal rose, 3½" (9 cm.) in diameter, weighing 62 grams, assayed at London in 1953.


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A pair of napkin rings decorated with enamelled international code flags for P and M, 2" (5.2cm) in length and weighing 85 grames the pair. They were assayed at London in 1947:


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Robert Edgar Stone (b.1903—d.1990) was an English silversmith who worked in the mid-20th century and was noted for hand-crafted commissions.

Stone was born in 1903 in London, son of a carpenter, Arthur Stone, and Ada, née Scantlebury. A childhood accident that nearly resulted in the loss of his arm affected his education, limiting the possible trades he could enter, and at 14 he began training in the silversmithing department of London's Central School of Arts and Crafts.

His work at the School resulted in a two-year travelling scholarship from the Worshipful Company of Goldsmiths, under which he travelled throughout western Europe and trained in Paris at La Maison Hénin. Stone established a workshop, in time took on apprentices, and in 1939 was made a liveryman of the Goldsmiths Company.

Stone's workshop produced works primarily of sterling silver. It was closed for the duration of World War II, during which he worked on torpedo testing in Scotland. He resumed work in London after the war, continuing to train apprentices and produce works at his workshop at 20 Garrick Street, where by 1955 he had trained seven apprentices. He continued to work at Garrick Street until 1964. He later operated from a workshop in his home at Portincaple, on the west coast of Scotland, until 1980. Stone died in 1990.

Stone's works were distinguished by being hand crafted throughout his career, during an era of increasing mass production of goods such as silverware. He was responsible for a number of major commissions, including a cross and candlesticks for the Temple Church, London; an altar cross for the Wren Chapel, Pembroke College, Cambridge; and a rosebowl made from palladium, a rarely used precious metal, prepared for the Institute of Metallurgy as a gift to HRH Princess Margaret.

Stone featured in a book by Australian businessman and collector Aubrey H L Gibson, who in The Rosebowl describes Gibson's visit to Stone's workshop where he learns some basics of silversmithing, and the creation by Stone of a rosebowl commissioned by Gibson.

Stone married Dorothy Rae in 1929 and had two daughters, Jean (also a silversmith) and Christine (a painter). His papers are archived at the Victoria & Albert Museum Archive of Art and Design.


J. Breckenridge (2003), "Robert E Stone (1903—1990)", The Silver Society Journal, 2003.
Aubrey H. L. Gibson (1952), The Rosebowl, F.W. Cheshire, Melbourne.
The Arts Council, Craftsmanship Today: An exhibition of the work of the modern designer-craftsman arranged by the Crafts Centre of Great Britain for the Arts Council, 1955.
E.D.S. Bradford, Contemporary Jewellery and Silver Design, cited in Aubrey H. L. Gibson (1952), The Rosebowl, F.W. Cheshire, Melbourne.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Stone_(silversmith)

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Tue May 27, 2014 3:09 pm

HILL & SON

4, Haymarket, London


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Hill & Son - London - 1907

The business of the Cutler, Thomas R. Hill (born c.1823), and later, his son, Edwin A.B. Hill (born. c.1851).

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sat May 31, 2014 9:36 am

JAMES SHOOLBRED & Co.Ltd.

Tottenham House, Tottenham Court Road, London


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Jas. Shoolbred & Co. - London - 1907

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Shoolbred's - London - 1915

James Shoolbred established his business in 1817 as Shoolbred and Cooke, originally as a drapers, it later, around 1822, became Shoolbred & Co.. The firm later, in the 1870's, turned to furniture design and manufacture, a product they were to become renowned for. The business expanded at a huge rate, in 1926 the store had 84 departments encompassing all fashions of trade and over 1,000 staff. However, the firm was running into trouble at this time and in 1927 control of the business was acquired by a private syndicate headed by Percy A. Best, but it was only a stay of execution. The business ceased trading in 1931, the stock and goodwill acquired by Harrods.

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Tue Jun 03, 2014 1:25 pm

CAROLINE SNELLGROVE

St Agnes, Cornwall

An example of the work and mark of Caroline Snellgrove, a trinket dish on a cone foot, with the bowl resembling an egg shell, 2½" (6cm) in height and weighing 50 grams, assayed at London in 2010:


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CS - London - 2010

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Fri Jun 06, 2014 2:58 pm

EMANUEL PELIKAN

8, Hardwick Street, Garnault Street, later, 102, St. John Street Road, Clerkenwell, London


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E. Pelikan - London - 1879

Emanuel Pelikan entered his mark 'EP' contained within an oblong punch, with the London Assay Office on the 2nd April 1878.

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