John Vernon - New York Silversmith

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dognose
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John Vernon - New York Silversmith

Postby dognose » Mon Mar 19, 2012 2:52 pm

JOHN VERNON

American Silver

Judge A. T. Clearwater has added to his collection of early American silver and lent to the Museum an unusual coffee-pot made by John Vernon, a prominent New York silversmith, working there in 1789. It is thirteen inches high, and weighs fifty-four ounces Troy. The only decoration-consists of reeding around the base and moulding around the top. Upon one side is handsomely engraved the cipher A. M. B., upon the other the monogram M. E. Its size, the simplicity and elegance of its design, and the absence of ornamentation immediately create the impression that it is a noble piece of silver worthy of the occassion for which it was made, as a wedding present for a member of a distinguished Philadelphia family.

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The Vernon's were one of the remarkable families of the Colonies. Samuel Vernon was a noted silversmith of Rhode Island, living with his son in a fine old Colonial mansion still standing at the corner of Mary and Clarke Streets in Newport. Built in 1758 and first occupied by Metcalf Bowler, a wealthy merchant, this house was sold in 1773 to William, the youngest son of Samuel the silversmith. An older son was a Tory, who because of his sympathy with the Loyalists was banished from Newport in 1776. Samuel's other sons, however, were ardent patriots. It is possible that the disloyalty of Thomas Vernon to the patriot cause led John Vernon, the New York silversmith, to include in his advertisement the following quaint sentence:–

"Mr. Vernon's plate may be known from English plate in that it has his initials I. V., and an American eagle's head instead of the British Lion, stamped upon all important pieces. It is of the best quality silver"

This coffee-pot bears Vernon's patriotic mark as described in his advertisement, and is exhibited with Judge Clearwater's collection in Gallery 22.


Source: The Bulletin of the Metropolitan Museum of Art - Volume 17 - 1922

Trev.

wev
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Re: John Vernon - New York Silversmith

Postby wev » Mon Mar 19, 2012 5:48 pm

A better picture of the piece
Image

dognose
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Re: John Vernon - New York Silversmith

Postby dognose » Thu Apr 28, 2016 1:03 pm

Some images of a spoon by John Vernon:

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dognose
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Re: John Vernon - New York Silversmith

Postby dognose » Wed May 04, 2016 1:58 pm

The Will of Elizabeth Campbell that was witnessed by John Vernon, and his partner at the time, Thomas Underhill:

ELIZABETH CAMPBELL, widow, of New York City, to my grandson, John Campbell Hinson, his heirs forever, my silver tankard; to my granddaughter, Elizabeth Hinson, her heirs forever, my mahogany desk; to, my daughter Lydia, wife of Gilliam Cornell, her heirs forever, my largest looking-glass, also my clothes and wearing apparel and my kitchen furniture (my silver plate only excepted), all the residue of my estate, both real and personal, to be sold by my executors; to deliver good and sufficient deeds for my real estate to the purchaser thereof, the moneys arising from such sale to be divided as follows: One equal eighth part to my grandson, John Campbell Hinson, his heirs forever; one equal eighth part to my granddaughter, Elizabeth Hinson, her heirs forever; one equal fourth part to my daughter, Ann White, her heirs forever; one equal fourth part to my daughter, Elizabeth Brownjohn, to her heirs forever; the remaining fourth part to my daughter, Lydia Cornell, her heirs forever. I appoint my daughter, Ann White, my son-in-law, Gilliam Cornell, and Anthony Abramse, executors.

Dated March 16, 1787. Witnesses, Thomas Underhill, John Vernon, both silversmiths; Francis Child. Proved, December 17, 1787.


Source: Collections of the New-York Historical Society for the Year 1905 - New York Historical Society - 1906

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