Early New Zealand Silversmiths

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Feb 07, 2012 6:06 am

BENJAMIN WABY & Co.

80 George Street, Dunedin

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Waby, Benjamin and Co. , Watch-makers. Jewellers, Engravers, and Art Goods Dealers, 80 George Street, Dunedin. Mr. Waby was born in 1876, and educated at the George Street school. He entered the employment of Messrs D. Benjamin and Co., in 1889, and for about thirteen years was connected with that firm's jewellery business, where he gained a thorough knowledge of the trade. Early in 1902, he decided to try his luck on his own account in the retail line, and opened his now well known shop at 80 George Street. Mr. Waby's stock is already famous for its Japanese ware; and the china includes Doulton, Beleek, Wedgewood, Bretby, Dresden, and Austrian. The firm stocks many outside lines that the trade have never taken up, including Maori goods, such as kits, mats, piu-pius, and fish-hooks. Watches, jewellery and plate are on view, in a fine skilfully selected variety. The repairing departments are in skilled hands, and every care is taken to increase the good reputation enjoyed by the firm.

Source: The Cyclopedia of New Zealand [Otago & Southland Provincial Districts] - 1905 - The New Zealand Electronic Text Centre

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Wed Feb 08, 2012 1:45 pm

ALFRED BARTLETT

222, Queen Street, Auckland

Bartlett, Alfred G., Chronometer Maker, Watchmaker and Jeweller, 222 Queen Street, Auckland. Mr. Bartlett is a native of Dulwich, England, and was apprenticed to Mr. W. Connell, chronometer maker, of Clerkenwell, London, in 1833. At the expiration of his term of indenture he obtained employment with Messrs Brockbank and Atkins, and later with Messrs Dent and Co., and spent nearly twenty years in the service of these firms. For the last three years of his London life Mr. Bartlett was occupied as chronometer examiner to Messrs John Fletcher and Sons, and during that period a very large number of instruments passed through his hands. A serious illness, culminating in brain fever, compelled him to relinquish business, and while convalescent, his attention was directed to New Zealand, to which the Kaipara special settlers were then making preparations to sail. He decided to throw in his lot with them, and accordingly departed from London in the ship “William Miles,” which arrived at Auckland in November, 1862. Circumstances deterred him from going on to the land, and he, therefore, commenced the business which he has since carried on with marked successs. Shortly after his arrival in Auckland he erected an observatory, and supplied the city with correct time through the medium of a time-ball and clock. He has erected public clocks in various parts of the district, as well as at Tonga and elsewhere. His establishment is one of the most complete in the Colony, being provided with every appliance requisite to the requirements of a large and progressive business, and his reputation, particularly in relation to chronometer and fine watch work, is more than local. The shop is artistically fitted, and contains, in addition to the regular lines of watches and clocks, a bewildering assortment of articles of the jeweller's and silversmith's craft, the extent and variety of which cannot be described in a brief article.

Source: The Cyclopedia of New Zealand [Auckland Provincial District] - Cyclopedia Company Limited - 1902 - The New Zealand Electronic Text Centre

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Thu Feb 09, 2012 4:05 pm

WHALE BROTHERS

230, Colombo Street, Christchurch

Whale Bros. (Seth R. Whale, working jeweller, and Cyril K. Whale, practical watchmaker), Manufacturing Jewellers, Watchmakers, and Importers, 230 Colombo Street; Workshop in Chancery Lane, Christchurch. This partnership was formed in 1901, when the premises in Colombo Street, opposite Messrs Cook and Ross's, were acquired. The business has from the first rapidly increased in all its branches–watchmaking, repairing, and jewellery–and the firm has received a large amount of patronage throughout Christchurch and its suburbs, besides securing a growing country trade. The shop facing Colombo Street is fitted with well-filled show cases, in which a good general stock of electro-plate, silver plate, handsome clocks of various styles, and other high-class articles are displayed to advantage. The counter cases also are well stocked with tastefully arranged gold and silver brooches, case goods, sleeve links, watches, etc. The arrangement of the windows also shows excellent taste, and displays a very fine assortment of jewellery, electro-plate, and other goods of the very best quality. One window especially is stocked with an artistic display of greenstone goods. At the workshop in Chancery Lane there is a competent staff of working jewellers, and the interesting art of manufacturing jewellery is carried on in all its stages, from the melting of the gold to the setting of precious gems.

Source: Source: The Cyclopedia of New Zealand [Canterbury Provincial District] - 1903 - The New Zealand Electronic Text Centre

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Feb 14, 2012 4:33 am

WILLIAM MAUD

Karangahape Road, Auckland

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Maud, William, Watchmaker and Jeweller, Karangahape Road, Auckland. This business was established in 1883, by the present proprietor, who was born at Chagford, Devonshire, England. Mr. Maud was educated at his native village, and apprenticed at Bristol. He commenced business at Ryde, in the Isle of Wight, and was there for ten years. In 1883 he came to Auckland on account of illhealth, by the s.s. “British King.” After his arrival in Auckland he began business in Karangahape Road, and removed to his present handsome premises in 1890. Mr. Maud keeps a first-class stock of watches and jewellery. He makes specialties of watch repairing and manufacturing various kinds of jewellery.

Source: The Cyclopedia of New Zealand [Auckland Provincial District] - Cyclopedia Company Limited - 1902 - The New Zealand Electronic Text Centre

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W. Maud - Auckland - 1896 (National Library of New Zealand)

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Wed Feb 15, 2012 5:50 am

JAMES HOWDEN

92, Queen Street, Auckland

Howden, James, Watchmaker, Jeweller, and Optician, 92 Queen Street, Auckland. Bankers, Bank of New Zealand. Mr. Howden is a native of Climber Park, Sherwood Forest, Nottinghamshire, England. He learned his business with Messrs Simmons, Bunyan, and Gardner, of Manchester, completed his term in 1857, and subsequently worked in the same city till 1861, when he came to New Zealand by the ship “Black Eagle,” from London. Mr. Howden was all through the New Zealand war; he was on active service for about two years, and served as a volunteer for about five. He established the present business in 1862, and his plant comprises lathes and the latest and best machines and appliances for manufacturing jewellery of all descriptions, and for such delicate work as diamond-setting and engraving. There is also everything that is needful for the watch cleaning and repairing department. Mr. Howden is a direct importer of watches, clocks, jewellery, precious stones, optical goods, and pianos and organs. The shop, which is centrally situated in Queen Street, is built of brick, is one storey in height, and has a floorage space of 900 square feet. One of the largest mirrors in the Colony is fixed behind the counter, and reflects all the beautiful show cases from the other side of the shop, creating a pleasingly interesting illusion as to size. Mr. Howden's business connection extends throughout the whole of the North Island.

Source: The Cyclopedia of New Zealand [Auckland Provincial District] - Cyclopedia Company Limited - 1902 - The New Zealand Electronic Text Centre



Advices from New Zealand state that a man named Alexander M'Lean, who is believed to be from Sydney, was captured last month, while engaged in plundering Mr. James Howden's jewellery shop in Queen Street, Auckland, on Saturday afternoon during the temporary absence of the owner. He had £700 worth of booty packed up ready for removal.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st September 1890

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Thu Feb 16, 2012 4:46 am

ARTHUR JOHN SHAW

13, Rattray Street, Dunedin

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Shaw, Arthur John. Watchmaker, Jeweller, and Optician. 13 Rattray Street, Dunedin. Bankers: Bank of New Zealand. Private residence: High Street, Dunedin.

This well-known business was established by Mr. Peter Adair in 1870, and was acquired by the present proprietor in 1888. The shop is handsomely fitted up, has a fine show window, and contains a large display of watches, clocks, electro-plated ware and jewellery of all descriptions. Mr. Shaw imports as well as buys locally. The premises consist of the ground floor of a substantial brick building. Behind the shop there is a convenient work-room with a complete plant for carrying on all the requirements of the trade. Mr. Shaw was born in Bristol, England, in 1859, and came to New Zealand in 1863; he was educated at Mr. J. B. Park's school and served his apprenticeship with his predecessor, Mr. Adair, in whose employment he remained as assistant until he purchased the business. Mr. Shaw has earned a reputation for repairing and cleaning chronometers, chronographs, and repeaters second to none in the Colonies. He was initiated into the Masonic Order in Lodge Otago Kilwinning, S.C.

Mr. Shaw was married in 1885 to a daughter of Mr. S. Hanlon, of Dunedin, and has three daughters.


Source: The Cyclopedia of New Zealand [Otago & Southland Provincial Districts] - 1905 - The New Zealand Electronic Text Centre

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Feb 17, 2012 4:28 pm

S. JACOBS

Princes Street, Dunedin

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S. Jacobs - Dunedin - 1883

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sat Feb 18, 2012 7:03 am

NORMAN LINDSAY REID

Victoria Avenue, Wanganui

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Reid, Norman Lindsay, Watchmaker and Jeweller, Victoria Avenue, Wanganui. This business was established, and for some time conducted, by Mr Black. It was then acquired by the Jewelry Importing Company, from whom it was bought by the present proprietor in March, 1907. The premises consist of the ground floor of a wood and iron building. The shop has a handsome plate-glass window, in which is displayed a fine assortment of jewellery and other goods, and the interior is well fitted up on all sides with glazed show cases. A convenient workroom is situated behind the shop. Mr Reid is a considerable importer of various kinds of jewellery, besides watches, clocks, and other articles. He was born in Dunedin, was educated at Milton, and afterwards learned his trade with Messrs. G. and T. Young in his native city. He remained with the firm for eight years, was then employed by Messrs. Stewart, Dawson and Company for two years, and finally returned to the employ of the former firm. Six months later he left in order to become manager of the business which he afterwards acquired. Mr Reid was for some time lieutenant of the Alexandra Rifles. In 1905 he married a daughter of the late Mr R. Hayes, Inspector of Public Works, of Melbourne, and has one son.

Source: The Cyclopedia of New Zealand [Taranaki, Hawke’s Bay & Wellington Provincial Districts] - 1908 - The New Zealand Electronic Text Centre

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Feb 20, 2012 2:51 pm

SIEGFRIED KOHN

59, Lambton Quay, Wellington

Kohn, Siegfried, Diamond Cutter, Gold and Silversmith, and Practical Working Optician, 59 Lambton Quay, Wellington. Bankers, National Bank of New Zealand. London agents, Messrs. Bradey and Cohn, 36 Basinghall Street, E.C.

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This business was established nearly forty years ago in Christchurch, and for some years the Wellington establishment was conducted as a branch, eventually being taken over by the present proprietor on his own account. Mr. Kohn's premises are centrally situated and well appointed. The building, which is of iron, containing upwards of 2500 square feet of floorage space, consists of shop, sight-testing room, and a large workshop at the back. The shop has a magnificent plate glass front, displaying a wealth of precious stones, jewellery, watches, plate-ware etc., which are dazzling in their brilliance, especially when illuminated by the electric light. The interior, fitted up with splendid show cases, each containing choice articles of great value, is lighted from a handsome dome, on which are emblazoned the coats of arms of successive governors of New Zealand who have bestowed their patronage on this prominent establishment. The optical department, which is elaborately furnished and lighted from above, is supplied with a vast collection of lenses numbering upwards of 15,000, and complete apparatus for accurately testing the sight, Mr. Kohn having devoted himself specially to this part of his profession, Further behind are situated the large workshops, which include a complete plant of machinery of the latest design. The rolling mill for silver and other metal plates is reputed to be the largest in the Colony: the sliding die box press will deliver a blow equal to seven tons falling ten feet; there are also wire rollers and hammers for striking blows with steel dies, of which there are three hundred cut in hard steel, many of them having cost large sums to engrave; and a grinding machine for lenses. Mr. Kohn, who is a native of Prussia, served his apprenticeship with the celebrated diamond setters, Messrs. Lionhardt and Fiegel, of Berlin, and after several years subsequent experience, passed his examination at the Master Goldsmith's Institute, coming to New Zealand, per ship “Somersetshire” in 1873. As an exhibitor, he has taken prizes for jewellery at Paris, Melbourne, Sydney, and at all New Zealand Exhibitions. For many years Mr. Kohn has held contracts for the supply of passes, medals and watches to the Colonial Government – the members' gold passes for New Zealand railways, the medals granted by the Defence Department, and the guards' watches used for the last twenty years on the railways. Agricultural medals and large trophy shields in abundance have also been produced at these works. Mr. Kohn has a large staff of experts employed in the business. His brother in London acts as buyer, and makes regular shipments of clocks, watches, plate, optical goods, and jewellery of the best quality and of the latest and most fashionable styles, by mail steamers.


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Source: The Cyclopedia of New Zealand [Wellington Provincial District] - Cyclopedia Company Limited - 1897 - The New Zealand Electronic Text Centre

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Feb 21, 2012 6:06 pm

WALTER SLANEY

Corner of Queen Street and Vulcan Lane, Auckland

Slaney, Walter, Manufacturing Jeweller, corner of Queen Street and Vulcan Lane, Auckland. P.O. Box 128. Bankers, Union Bank of Australasia. Private residence, Vincent Street. Mr. Slaney, who is a native of Birmingham, England, founded his present business in 1881, since which it has pursued a steady course, and is now (1901) one of the best known and most thriving of its class in Auckland. All kinds of jewellery of the most up-to-date description are kept in stock. Diamond-mounting is a specialty of Mr. Slaney's business.

Source: The Cyclopedia of New Zealand [Auckland Provincial District] - Cyclopedia Company Limited - 1902 - The New Zealand Electronic Text Centre

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Feb 24, 2012 11:49 am

ISAIAH WOOLF

Palmerston Street, Riverton

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Woolf, Isaiah, Boot and Shoe Importer, Clothier, Watchmaker and Jeweller, Palmerston Street, Riverton. Mr Woolf has conducted his business since 1879. He has three separate departments, including watchmaking and jewellery, clothing, and boots and shoes, all of which he imports. Mr Woolf was born in 1856, in Oxford, England, where he was educated, and served an apprenticeship to the watchmaking business. He came out to Melbourne in 1876, by the ship “Lord Warden,” and after working at his trade for eighteen months, removed to Dunedin. Later on he settled in Riverton, and established his present business. Mr Woolf is a member of the Aparima Lodge of Freemasons. He was married, in 1890, to a daughter of Mr John Buckley, of County Cork, Ireland, and has one daughter.

Source: The Cyclopedia of New Zealand [Otago & Southland Provincial Districts] - 1905 - The New Zealand Electronic Text Centre

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sun Feb 26, 2012 5:49 am

ALEXANDER SAMUEL SARGISON

Revell Street, Hokitika

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Mr. Alexander Samuel Sargison has been a member of the Hokitika Volunteer Band since its inception, and was appointed bandmaster in the year 1904. He was born in 1864, in Gippsland, Victoria, Australia, and came to New Zealand at an early age. He married a daughter of the late Mr. J. Hawkes, of Tasmania, in the year 1894, and has two sons and two daughters. Mr. Sargison is further referred to as a watchmaker and jeweller, in Revell Street, Hokitika.

Source: The Cyclopedia of New Zealand [Nelson, Marlborough & Westland Provincial Districts] - 1906 - The New Zealand Electronic Text Centre

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Feb 28, 2012 5:16 am

KARL GRIESHABER

155 Colombo Street, Christchurch

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Grieshaber, Karl, Watchmaker, Jeweller, and Optician, 155 Colombo Street, Christchurch. Bankers, Union Bank of Australia. Private residence, May's Road, Papanui.
Mr. Grieshaber was born in 1853, in Baden, Germany, where he was educated, and served an apprenticeship of three and a half years to the watchmaking and jewellery trade. He subsequently worked as an assistant in London, Birmingham, Worcester, South Wales, Essex, and Kent. While in London he was employed at the establishments of Messrs. Benson, Lockhart Hill, and Connell, 83 Cheapside. Mr. Grieshaber came to Lyttelton in 1877 per ship “Crusader,” and established himself at his trade in the same year. He is a direct importer of every description of manufactured articles, as well as being himself a manufacturer of jewellery, rings, brooches, etc., in every variety, for stock as well as to order, his specialty being diamond-setting. The premises occupied in Colombo Street are centrally situated, and consist of a two storey brick building. The shop is well-appointed in every respect, and fitted with handsome counters and show-cases. The work-room is situated on the first floor, and has all the necessary machinery for the trade. Mr. Grieshaber has complete sight-testing appliances, and undertakes the grinding and fitting of lenses to suit all eyes, for which he has a large, up-to-date stock of optical requisites. His business extends throughout Canterbury, and he makes monthly trips into the country districts. Mr. Grieshaber was married in 1884 to a daughter of the late Mr. Strien, of Prussia.


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Source: The Cyclopedia of New Zealand [Canterbury Provincial District] - 1903 - The New Zealand Electronic Text Centre

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sun Mar 04, 2012 9:21 am

GEORGE THOMAS WHITE

208, Columbo Street, Christchurch

White, George Thomas, Watchmaker, Manufacturing Jeweller, and Importer, 208 Colombo Street. Christchurch. Established in 1878. All kinds of jewellery, Including wedding-rings and keepers, are made on the premises, which are registered as a workshop under the “Factories Act.” Mr. White was previously in business in Taunton, Somersetshire, England.

Source: The Cyclopedia of New Zealand [Canterbury Provincial District] - 1903 - The New Zealand Electronic Text Centre

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Mar 05, 2012 3:56 pm

WATCH AND CLOCK TRADE

The introduction of American watches and clocks into New Zealand is of recent date. They have, however, become so very popular and so generally in use that the trade in them bids fair to swell to large proportions.

These goods usually arrive here by way of London, instead of coming direct from the United States, and on that account I have no means of determining the exact value of United States imports. The reason given by the American manufacturers for not sending direct, instead of by way of London, is the frequency of communication between the latter city and New Zealand. There has been, however, during the last few years, a steady increase in the direct shipments of these goods from the United States to this colony, and there is reason to believe that these shipments will be still further increased.

The vessels which arrive in this colony from the Atlantic ports of the United States come only at irregular intervals, and scarcely ever direct to one port; but, since the establishment of lines of sailing-vessels at Boston and New York, the communication between those cities and Auckland has been more frequent and regular.

The extent to which American watches and clocks are advertised in New Zealand is extraordinary. There is scarcely a jeweller's shop in Auckland, Wellington, Napier, Christchurch, Dunedin, and Invercargill, that has not signs bearing the inscription, "American watches and clocks for sale."

A leading jeweller in Auckland said to me: "It is difficult to sell an English watch, and, as far as the Geneva watches are concerned, they are being fast driven from the market. Everybody wants an American watch. I am not prepared to say that American watches are any better than other watches, but it is the fashion to have them. There is not a boy or servant-girl in the country who can raise enough money who does not want an American watch."

I give below a table showing the value of watches and clocks imported into New Zealand for each year since 1871:–

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N.B.–The large increase in the numbers for packages after 1879 is caused by the actual number of clocks and watches being given for the following years, instead of the number of packages and cases, as in the previous years.

It will be seen from this table that a large number of watches and clocks arrived in New Zealand via Australia. There was a marked falling-off in the imports of these goods in 1880, on account of the financial depression in the colonies during that year. There was also a decrease in the quantity and value of all kinds of imports. The revival of trade, however, began in the spring of 1881, and has kept up steadily ever since. The value of both the imports and exports of New Zealand for 1882 was greater than that of any previous year.

The Customs returns make no distinction between gold and silver watches, and I am therefore unable to give the exact value of each kind. The duty charged on them is the same–viz., 15 per cent. ad valorem. The value of silver watches imported into New Zealand is in excess of that of gold, and it would be safe to set down the number of silver watches sold here at fully four times the number of gold watches.

I frequently have opportunities of examining the stocks of wholesale and retail dealers in watches, not only here, but in Dunedin and Christchurch; and it is gratifying to me to find among them such large assortments of American watches. The most notable thing about the American watches, next to their cheapness or economy of production, is their neat and tasteful appearance; indeed, some of the American chronometers that I examined impressed me as being the most beautiful pieces of mechanism that I ever beheld in my life; and I will mention here that my opportunities for observing this kind of work have been considerable, and especially so during my residence as United States Consul at Copenhagen, where I had the pleasure of paying frequent visits to the factory of Jourgensen, one of the most celebrated watchmakers in the world. I had also opportunities of studying the unique display of watches in the chronological collection of the Danish Kings in Rosenberg Castle, at Copenhagen, and also the collection of watches in various other museums in Europe.

Although my attention has only lately been directed to the Waltham watches, I am of opinion that they surpass all others in the simplicity of their construction. Another feature that cannot be commended too highly is that they are made with such perfect exactitude that the parts of all watches of the same class can be interchanged. These and other points of excellence have made them very popular in the Australasian Colonies, but it must be borne in mind that this popularity is of recent date in New Zealand, and that at present it is confined principally to the cheaper classes of watches, and that there is still a strong prejudice on the part of those who are considered competent judges here against the American article. Indeed, very few are even inclined to regard the gold and silver cases of American watches as genuine unless they have received the British Hall-mark, which guarantees that they are made of gold or silver. On account of this prejudice watchmakers in the United States have their cases made in London, or else send them there for the purpose of receiving the Hall-mark. Nearly all colonists understand the significance of the Hall-mark, but only the progressive and cultured class place equal faith in the guarantee certificates of well-known American firms that the accompanying cases are warranted sterling silver or 18-carat gold, United States Mint assay. American cases of the Waltham Watch Company are, however, gradually forcing their way into this market, and I do not doubt that they will soon supersede those made in Europe.

The prestige given to the American watches at the International Exhibitions held successively at Paris, Sydney, and Melbourne has done much towards overcoming the opposition which the American manufacturer has to contend with.

Mr. Donald Manson, the manager of the Australian agency of the American Watch Company of Waltham, Massachusetts, has recently made me acquainted with some of the difficulties he had to encounter in the introduction of the Waltham watches into this market. He describes the opposition to his company as stronger than that encountered in any other new field of labour. He said: "The inherent belief which the New-Zealander had in the old hand-made English lever watch was so strongly embedded that very few entertained any hopes of the company's products ever getting a foothold in this colony." It was a matter of unremitting toil for years before he could extend the sale of the company's watches. Indeed, it would seem that nothing but a spirit of indomitable perseverance could ever have fought down so successfully the stronghold barriers of trade Connections which the continental markets had established here.

The success which the Waltham watch achieved at the International Exhibitions at Sydney in 1879, and at Melbourne in 1880, was certainly of a triumphant character. Much praise had been bestowed upon the Waltham watch by the Press of Europe and America, and it was well known that it carried off the gold medal at the Paris Exhibition of 1878, the highest prize bestowed upon the exhibitors of watches, and that it was given by eleven international jurors, only one of whom was an American; but this success, while very gratifying to Americans, was the means of strengthening the opposition to our watches at the Sydney Exhibition. Indeed, at Sydney the Waltham watch had to contend against the watches of six famous British manufacturers (including those of Victor Kullberg, T. Russell and Sons, and Nicole and Nillsen); two German, H. Lange and Sons, Dresden, and the Wurtemberg Watch Factory, Schwarzwald; and two celebrated French manufacturers, A. H. Rodanet, Paris, and G. Fribandeau, Besancon. The Commissioners unquestionably exercised great care, and, after repeated tests by Professor H. C. Eussell, Astronomer Royal at the Sydney Observatory, awarded the only gold medal to the American (Waltham) Watch Company, and in addition three special and four first prizes, one of the latter being an award for the improvement in cases, the number of artistic forms and designs used, the beauty and elegance of their finish, and for their new and indestructible method of enamelling.

At Melbourne the Waltham Company had a much keener competition than at Sydney; but there, as at other places, finally succeeded in distancing all their competitors, and received two gold medals: one for their pre-eminence in horological science, and the other for their superiority in art workmanship.

The Waltham Company thus far have not only produced a better watch than any of their competitors, but at the same time they have produced a much cheaper one. They have succeeded in a marked degree, by means of their improved compensated balance, in overcoming the difficulties of expansion and contraction occasioned by changes of temperature. It is well known that a rise in the temperature adds to the length of the spring of the watch, and thereby diminishes its elasticity. This change is occasioned by the expansion of the balance, which augments its moment of inertia. The elastic portion of a spring varies inversely according to the length and the time of the vibration of the balance. If the inertia is increased and the elastic portion of the spring weakened, the watch must necessarily go slower, but when there is a fall in the temperature the action is reversed, and the watch goes more rapidly. It would not have been possible for the Waltham Company to overcome these obstacles without the application of machinery–an improvement upon the old method due solely to American inventive genius, and to which the highest scientific authorities in the known world have rendered tribute ungrudgingly. Some idea of the advantages derived from the use of automatic machinery can be formed from the statement that the delicacy of construction of the mechanism invented by the Waltham Company is such that a micrometer which they exhibited at Paris measured the twenty-five thousandth part of an inch, and might readily be divided under a lens.


Source: New Zealand: Her Commerce and Resources - Gilderoy Wells Griffin - 1884

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Wed Mar 07, 2012 7:01 am

FREDERICK WALTER COLLINS

Emerson Street, Napier

Collins, Frederick Walter, Watchmaker and Jeweller, Emerson Street, Napier. Mr. Collins first started in business in 1880, when he opened a shop in Emerson Street. Later on, however, he conducted a large business for nearly eleven years in Hastings Street, and in the early part of 1905 he bought his present business. The premises are conveniently appointed, and a good stock of manufactured and imported jewellery is carried; four experienced workmen are employed. Mr. Collins was born at Peckham, London, England, in the year 1853, and came to New Zealand at an early age in the ship “African.” He was educated at public schools, and afterwards served an apprenticeship to the jewellery trade in Auckland. Later on, he gained three years' experience in a large Sydney house, then returned to New Zealand, and settled in Napier. Mr. Collins takes a keen interest in the Working Men's Club, of which he has been president.

Source: The Cyclopedia of New Zealand [Taranaki, Hawke’s Bay & Wellington Provincial Districts] - 1908 - The New Zealand Electronic Text Centre

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Mar 12, 2012 9:23 am

ALLAN McCORKINDALE

Station Street, Hastings

McCorkindale, Allan, Watchmaker and Jeweller, Station Street, Hastings. This business was established in the year 1889, by the present proprietor. The premises consist of a shop, with a plate-glass front, and a work-room behind, and a large and well-assorted stock of watches, jewellery, silver plate, and optical goods, is displayed. Mr. McCorkindale has also a branch business at Feilding, which is managed by his eldest son. He was born in Glasgow, Scotland, and came page to New Zealand in the year 1860. For seventeen years he conducted a business in Oamaru, which he subsequently sold in order to settle in Hastings. As a Freemason Mr. McCorkindale is a past master of Lodge Heretaunga, No. 73. N.Z.C.

Source: The Cyclopedia of New Zealand [Taranaki, Hawke’s Bay & Wellington Provincial Districts] - 1908 - The New Zealand Electronic Text Centre

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Thu Mar 15, 2012 1:06 pm

ALFRED SHAW

Lambton Quay, Wellington

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Alfred Shaw - Wellington - 1881

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sun Mar 18, 2012 8:22 am

CHARLES LEZARD

High Street, Christchurch

Mr. Charles Lezard, an ex-Councillor of the City of Christchurch, was born in London in 1838, where he was educated and apprenticed to the watchmakers and jewellers' trade in the Horological School at Geneva, serving for seven years. Mr. Lezard landed at Port Chalmers from the ship “Oliver Cromwell,” in 1862, and at once settled in Canterbury, establishing the business which he has since conducted in High Street. He was a member of No. 9 Company of Volunteers in the Canterbury Battalion from 1863 to 1868, and obtained the rank of lieutenant. He was initiated in the Masonic Order in London, but is unattached in New Zealand. Mr. Lezard is also an old member of the American Order of Oddfellows. He was married in 1865 to a daughter of Mr. Jacob Schwartz, of Bavaria, and has two sons and eight daughters.

Source: The Cyclopedia of New Zealand [Canterbury Provincial District] - 1903 - The New Zealand Electronic Text Centre

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Mar 19, 2012 1:57 pm

JOHN BRUNETTE

Hereford Street, later, Columbo Street, Christchurch, later, High Street, Hawera


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J. Brunette - Christchurch - 1879


Brunette, John, Goldsmith and Jeweller, Watchmaker, and Optician, High Street, Hawera. P.O. Box 75. Bankers, Bank of New Zealand.

Mr. Brunette's business was established in 1882, and is now carried in by himself and his son. The shop is well stocked, and a flourishing business is done by the firm. Mr. Brunette joined the Masonic Lodge, No. 652, Scottish Constitution, Hawera, in 1885, passed various offices, and was secretary for three years. The Lodge afterwards affiliated with the New Zealand Constitution, and Mr. Brunette was installed as Worshipful Master in 1897. Mr. Brunette is further referred to as a member of the Hawera Borough Council.


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Councillor John Brunette, a member of the Hawera Borough Council, is well known as a watchmaker and jeweller. He was born in Clerkenwell London, in 1837, and is the eldest son of the late Mr. John Brunette, who for fifty years occupied the responsible position of manager for Messrs Leavers and Harker, manufacturing jewellers, City Road, London. Mr. Brunette was educated at Dame Owen's Grammar School, Islington, and subsequently entered the Government School of Design, Somerset House. After completing his studies in technical education in London, he entered the employment of Messrs Leavers and Harker to learn the trade, and afterwards visited Coventry and Birmingham, where he gained a thorough knowledge and experience of the watchmaking and jewellery business. Having a desire to settle in one of the Australian colonies, and hearing that Messrs G. Coates and Company, of Christchurch, Canterbury, required a practical assistant, Mr. Brunette made enquiries, with the result that, out of 300 names presented for the position, he was the successful applicant. With his wife and five children he arrived at Lyttelton in 1870, in the ship “Monarch,” commanded by Captain Paddle, and during the passage he acted as schoolmaster to the children on board. After several years of useful service with his employers, Mr. Brunette started business on his own account. It was he who manufactured the Bishop's crozier and pastoral staff for the Christchurch Cathedral, an extremely handsome and valuable piece of work, and the first of the kind made in New Zealand. These insignia are of silver, oxidised, set with jasper and greenstone, and are used by the bishop in important ceremonies. Prior to the abolition of the provinces Mr. Brunette was in charge of the timeball system at Lyttelton, and performed his duties to the entire satisfaction of the Minister of Public Works. After the settlement of the native difficulty on the Waimate Plains, Taranaki, Mr. Brunette saw that there was a good opening in Hawera for one of his profession, and started business there in 1881. He has remained there ever since, and is now (1906) the oldest established watchmaker or jeweller between Wanganui and New Plymouth. Mr. Brunette has identified himself with every movement for the advancement of the town and district, and has been a member of the borough council, licensing bench, school committee, and numerous other public bodies and institutions for many years. He helped to promote an industrial exhibition for the purpose of raising funds to supplement a bequest of £200 made by the late Mr. Mitchell, for a hospital. The exhibition resulted in a net profit of £525. These sums were handed to the New Plymouth Hospital Board, and together with a Government subsidy of £1 5s in the pound, were used in payment of the cost of the Hawera Hospital, which is now (1906) capable of receiving thirty patients. As a Freemason, Mr. Brunette is one of the oldest members of Lodge Hawera No. 31, New Zealand Constitution, and held the position of secretary for several years. He was installed Worshipful Master in 1897, the year of Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee. Mr. Brunette is now (1906) chairman of the Hawera Chamber of Commerce. He was for several years a member of the 39th Middlesex Volunteers, and became a member of the Christchurch City Guards in 1872. In 1857 he married Mary Elizabeth, grand-daughter of Mr. Edward Pressdee, Worcestershire, England, and has, surviving, four sons and four daughters; seven of whom are married, and there are numerous grand-children.

Source: The Cyclopedia of New Zealand [Taranaki, Hawke’s Bay & Wellington Provincial Districts] - 1908 - The New Zealand Electronic Text Centre

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