Early Australian Silversmiths

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Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sun Sep 04, 2011 11:15 am

HARDY BROTHERS

13, Hunter Street, Sydney

Hardy Brothers, Watchmakers and Jewellers, 13 Hunter-street.–This business, which is the leading one of its kind in Sydney, was established in 1839 by Mr. John Hardy and his brother, Mr. Samuel Hardy, who remained the home partner up to the time of his decease, when he was succeeded by his son, who has since retained that position. Mr. John Hardy is assisted in Sydney by his eldest son, who was admitted into partnership a few years ago. Their stock consists of all articles of the very best quality embraced in the jeweller's and watchmaker's trade; and as a proof of their standing in public appreciation, although the business is conducted upstairs and without show windows, all visitors of note to the city view the establishment before leaving. Their stock of diamonds, jewellery, and gems is held to be second to none out of London; their watches are'only of the best makers, and their silver plate would satisfy the most fastidious. The manufacture of plate and trophies, and the setting of gems is all carried on by a staff of workmen and assistants, numbering generally from twenty-five to thirty.

Source: The Aldine Centennial History of New South Wales - W. Frederic Morrison - 1888

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Hardy Brothers - Sydney - 1881


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SYDNEY, N.S.W.–The casket of which we give an illustration, was recently presented along with an address to the Earl of Jersey, the Governor of the Colony, as a token of respect from the people of New South Wales. It was executed by Messrs. Hardy Bros, of Sydney, from the design of Mr. Mitchelhill. It weighs about 150 ounces, and is 13 inches long, 6 inches wide, and 8 1/2 inches high The curved sides of the body are of polished silver, the legs or supports being of hammered silver oxidised. On the front are two panels of mother-of-pearl mosaic in antique gold setting, and placed centrally between them is a shield enamelled with the badge of New South Wales in colours, surrounded by a wreath of waratahs wrought in silver. The ends of the casket are adorned with shields bearing, in raised letters, the date and place of presentation, and the plain polished surface of the back is broken by a large laurel wreath wrought and frosted. The hinged lid has its polished surface relieved by slight repousse panels, leading off to ornamental corners, and serves as a base for a group of Lord Jersey's coat-of-arms blazoned in enamel. To the left and right of this are placed modelled plaques of the family crests of Childs and Villiers.

Source: The International Studio - Volume 28 - 1906


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Hardy Bros. - Sydney - 1962

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Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Sep 05, 2011 1:48 pm

FAIRFAX & ROBERTS

23-25, Hunter Street, Sydney.


FAIRFAX & ROBERTS carry on a large and profitable business as Watchmakers and Jewellers at 23 Hunter-street. At the time of its establishment in 1865 by Mr. Alfred Fairfax the supply of high-class jewellery and gems in Sydney was unequal to the demand among the more wealthy of the residents, and it was to fill this want that Mr. Fairfax, who, owing to family connections, was very popular, turned his attention to the jewellery trade. At a later date the branches of watchmaking and the manufacture of jewellery were added, and now form a prominent feature of the business, although the firm's specialty is in the setting to order of diamonds and other gems in rings, brooches, tiaras, necklaces, and other ornaments. For this purpose they always keep a large stock of unset stones on hand. A fine specimen of the class of work turned out of this establishment was the diamond bracelet presented by the ladies of Sydney to Lady Robinson, wife of Sir Hercules Robinson, on the occasion of her departure from the colony. Mr. O. G. Roberts joined the firm in 1883. He is a native of Victoria, born in 1850, and the son of Mr. J. W. Roberts, late Mayor of Geelong. He gained practical experience of the jewellery business in England, America, and on the continent. Mr. Alfred W. Fairfax is also an Australian native, having been born in Sydney in 1818. He was educated at King's school, Parramatta, and subsequently studied for the medical profession, but on account of his health he relinquished it, and engaged in commercial pursuits with conspicuous success.

Source: The Aldine Centennial History of New South Wales - W. Frederic Morrison - 1888


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Fairfax & Roberts - Sydney - 1898

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Fairfax & Roberts - Sydney - 1913

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Fairfax & Roberts - Sydney - 1913

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Fairfax & Roberts - Sydney - 1913

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Fairfax & Roberts Ltd. - Sydney - 1933

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Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sat Sep 10, 2011 2:09 pm

C. SIMMAT

Royal Arcade, 269 Pitt Street, Sydney.

C. Simmat, Watchmaker and Jeweller, Royal Arcade, 269 Pitt-street, was born in Germany in 1845, and learned his trade of mechanical watchmaker there, and at the same time acquired a considerable knowledge of electrical mechanics. He afterwards spent some time in Russia, France, and England, and arrived in Sydney in 1875, where he worked for a short period as a laborer till he succeeded in procuring an appointmont under the Government as an electric engineer, which he hold till 1878, when he resigned and commenced business as watchmaker and jeweller in a small way. By perseverance, skill, and energy, Mr, Simmat has gradually raised his business to be one of the leading establishments in Sydney, conducted in the prominent and extensive position in the Royal Arcade, Pitt-street. His business embraces all branches of the watchmaker's and jeweller's arts, and the manufacture of gold and silver plate, in all of which his stock is handsome and varied. Mr. Simmat is a married man, a republican, and a firm believer in protection.

Source: The Aldine Centennial History of New South Wales - W. Frederic Morrison - 1888

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Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sat Sep 10, 2011 2:14 pm

HORN AND PETERSEN

Sydney Arcade, King Street, Sydney.

Horn & Petersen, Watchmakers, Jewellers, and Opticians, Sydney Arcade, King-street.–This firm was established about 1870 at Brickfield Hill. Mr. Horn came to Sydney with the express intention of building up a large business on a sound commercial basis, which, with the assistance of Mr. Petersen, and by combined energy and perseverance he certainly has succeeded in doing; the establishment now being one of the best in the Southern Hemisphere. A few years after opening, Mr. Petersen proceeded to Queensland and established branches at Townsville, Herberton, Thornborough, Kingsborough, and other places. On the opening of the Sydney Arcade, the firm secured premises at the King-street entrance, from which all their operations radiate. An inspection of their workshops show that they have a deal of elaborate and ingenious machinery and all modern appliances, enabling them to turn out any class of work in connection with the watch and jewellery trades. The windows of Messrs. Horn and Petersen show a most attractive display of high-class work, better than which can hardly be expected away from the old world. Their optical department has also grown to considerable proportions.

Source: The Aldine Centennial History of New South Wales - W. Frederic Morrison - 1888

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Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Sep 12, 2011 11:29 am

T. T. JONES & SON

George Street, Sydney

T.T. Jones and Son, Goldsmiths and Watchmakers, have an extensive establishment in George-street.–-The business is an offshoot of the old firm of T. Jones, of Ludgate Hill, London, and was started in 1853 by the present senior partner, Mr. T. T. Jones. A leading feature of the firm is the manufacture of Masonic jewels and regalia, which are turned out on the premises equal in excellence to anything to be obtained in London; in fact, it is not uncommon for the firm to receive orders from the great metropolis of the world. Some exceedingly fine silver plate is manufactured, besides which all the work of a gold and silversmith, watchmaker, and manufacturing jeweller is carried out by twenty-five or thirty hands–in strange contrast with the time when the business occupied the attention of but one. Mr. G. T. Jones, who has lived in Sydney from the age of two years, was educated at the Grammar School, and now conducts the business.

Source: The Aldine Centennial History of New South Wales - W. Frederic Morrison - 1888



The number of diamonds found in New South Wales up to the 31st December, 1872, was estimated at between 5,000 and 6,000, the largest having been one of 5 3/4 carats, and the smallest one tenth of a grain. The average weight is about one grain. Opals, rubies, topaz, and other gems have been found in many parts of the Colony. The Sydney Morning Herald, February, 1873, reports:–

In the beginning of this year, also, there have been exhibited at the Bank of New South Wales, Sydney, a package of 375 diamonds, recently found at the Bingera diggings. Of the character of the stones there can be no doubt; they are one and all true diamonds, but their commercial value is trifling. With one exception, they are of small size, the bulk "off coloured," and many of them little better than "cleavage." Amongst them are a few octahedrons of good water. The largest stone is of irregular shape, fractured at one end, and flawed internally. They certainly prove that diamonds exist in the northern districts; and where those were found, larger and finer stones may yet turn up.

Queensland has not long retained the honor of being the only opal-producing Colony in Australia. We have not to go away from home to find a mine of that description. Any person who is dubious upon the point should pay a visit to Mr. Jones, jeweller, George-street, where there are now on exhibition a number of cut and uncut opals, and about twenty pieces of clayporphyry, sparkling with these gems in the matrix. Amongst the polished stones are some of the harlequin class. These are of a lighter colour than the Queensland stones previously exhibited at the same establishment, which had the peculiar tinge which scientists attribute to the presence of oxide of iron, and is the rarest variety. The New South Wales mine ii situated at Rocky Bridge Creek, New Abercrombie River, and is the property of Messrs. Emanuel and Magennis.


Source: New South Wales: The Oldest and Richest of the Australian Colonies - Charles Robinson - 1873

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Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Sep 13, 2011 12:26 pm

R. HELLYER

97, Bathurst Street, Sydney

Manufacturer of Electro-plate, Electro-plater, and Gilder, 97 Bathurst Street, was born in London, and there received his education and business training. In 1874 he established the above industry, which includes departments for the plating of ironwork– a special feature–and the re-plating of tableware. Mr. Hellyer is an accomplished metallist, and has secured numerous prizes for the work of his establishment. At the Intercolonial Exhibition of Sydney, held in 1876, he received a medal for the best exhibit of colonial-made electro-plate, and in 1884 was awarded a certificate for plated-ware by the commissioners of the Calcutta Exhibition. At the Industrial Exhibition, held in 1885, he secured first prizes for electro-plating and electro-plate manufactures. Mr. Hellyer executes every description of repairs, and manufactures watch-cases and other articles of silverware.


Source: The Aldine Centennial History of New South Wales - W. Frederic Morrison - 1888

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Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Wed Sep 14, 2011 2:20 pm

W. E. TOOSE

418, George Street, Sydney


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W.E. Toose - Sydney - 1888

W.E. Toose, Watchmaker, Jeweller, and Optician, 418 George-street, has in connection with his business several specialities which are worthy of notice. His plate powder, known as Toose's Imperial Plate Powder, is becoming very popular. This is prepared from native products discovered by the proprietor in his geological pursuits, and possesses the property of instantly removing all tarnish and producing a brilliant polish with little labor. By experienced men it is admitted to be superior in substance and action and much in advance of many preparations hitherto in use. Mr. Toose has introduced in his optical department an improved optometer. This instrument saves time and trouble in testing accurately the proper strength of glasses required by persons suffering from long or old sight, and is admitted by scientists to be one of the best instruments in use for measuring the loss of power in the optical nerve. Mr. Toose has received seven first-class medals aud six diplomas at the various exhibitions for the excellence of his workmanship in silver and gold, diamond setting, and for his manufacture of plate powder.

Source: The Aldine Centennial History of New South Wales - W. Frederic Morrison - 1888

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Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Sep 16, 2011 1:09 pm

JOHN WADDELL

783, George Street South, Sydney

John Waddell, Watchmaker and Jeweller, 783 George-street South, is a native of the north of Ireland, where he was born in 1840. He served his apprenticeship to the watchmaking under his father, and when twenty-three years of age came to Sydney, commencing for himself in 1863. For a time his business was carried on in an insignificant one-storey shingle-roofed building; but being a man of enterprise, he soon was enabled to build a handsome structure, between Brickfield Hill and the railway station, which he adorned with the first illuminated clock in the city. He has now a very large connection in all branches of the trade, and the establishment is well known throughout the country.

Source: The Aldine Centennial History of New South Wales - W. Frederic Morrison - 1888

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Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Sep 20, 2011 6:39 pm

JOHN HURST

321, George Street, Sydney

John Hurst, Importer and Manufacturer of Watches and Jewellery, 321 Georgestreet, was born in England in 1826. He learned his trade in London, and followed his speciality of an examiner of watches for some years. In 1858 he left England for New Zealand, and in I860 came to Sydney, and commenced business the following year. Mr. Hurst is an expert watchmaker, and his business consists largely of repairing, though, of course, the manufacture of all classes of jewellery is also carried on by his workmen. He claims to have made the first watch in the colonies, which was shown in the exhibition of 1870. He is now assisted in the business by his son; and his house employs a considerable number of working hands.

Source: The Aldine Centennial History of New South Wales - W. Frederic Morrison - 1888

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Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Wed Sep 21, 2011 6:56 am

HUGO DAHMS

141, Oxford Street, Sydney

Hugo Dahms, Watchmaker and Manufacturing Jeweller, 141 Oxford-street, was born in 1857 in Germany, and received his education at the high school of his native town. He learned his business training of a watchmaker in Germany, and that of a jeweller in England. He employed himself in these trades in Europe, and arrived in Sydney in 1880, shortly afterwards purchasing the business he now carries on. This was originally opened by a Mr. Glarsen in 1853, and is therefore one of the oldest in Sydney. Mr. Dahms makes a specialty of the manufacture of the art jewellery in gold and silver so much in vogue at the present day, and there may be seen at his establishment some pretty and original designs, quite equal in excellence to anything we receive from the mother country. Mr. Dahms carries on an extensive trade in all branches of watchmaking and jewellery, and has a country connection. He supplies country houses with his own productions, and has imported all the necessary plant for the manufacture of medals and trophies of every description. In this branch he feels quite able to compete with the imported article, and to supply the purchaser to the latter's advantage.

Source: The Aldine Centennial History of New South Wales - W. Frederic Morrison - 1888

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Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Sep 23, 2011 1:48 pm

HOGAN AND SMITH

350, George Street, Sydney

Hogan & Smith, Watchmakers and Jewellers, 350 George-street, established their business in 1880. The proprietors make repairing ships' chronometers a speciality; although all kinds of watches, clocks and jewellery are efficiently dealt with and manufactured on the premises by a staff of from ten to twelve hands. The business has been carried on by Mr. Hogan alone since 1883, in which year Mr. Smith retired. The present proprietor is a native of Tipperary, Ireland. His parents came to the colony in 1853, when he was only twelve months old, and he learned his business with the late E. Beekmann of 350 George-street.

Source: The Aldine Centennial History of New South Wales - W. Frederic Morrison - 1888

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Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Sep 23, 2011 1:59 pm

ROBERT GOURLAY

35, Collins Street East, Melbourne

Gourlay, Robert, Melbourne, was born in Kirkcudbright, Scotland, and learned his business of watchmaker and manufacturing jeweller in Glasgow, whence he went to London. He came to Victoria in 1880, and entered the establishment of Messrs. Kilpatrick and Co., of Collins-street, remaining with that firm for nearly two years. On leaving he went to New South Wales, where he managed a retail business in Sydney, and after a few months became traveller for the well-known London house of Mr. E. Culver, in which capacity he remained until about January 1885, when he accepted a two years' engagement with Mr. J. R. Rowlands, Collins-street, Melbourne, as watchmaker and managing assistant, and, during Mr. Rowlands' absence in England, took complete charge of the business. On the 14th March, 1887, commenced business for himself as watchmaker, manufacturing jeweller, and direct importer of precious stones, in his present premises, 35 Collins-street east. Besides precious stones, which he makes up in the newest London designs, Mr. Gourlay imports all kinds of watches, clocks, jewellery, plate, and optical goods direct.

Source: Victoria and its Metropolis, Past and Present - Alexander Sutherland - 1888

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Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sat Sep 24, 2011 1:49 am

W. DAVEY

Charles Street, and later, Brisbane Street, Launceston, Tasmania.

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W Davey - Launceston - 1865

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W Davey - Launceston - 1881

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Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Sep 26, 2011 3:03 pm

HERMAN FINCKH

300, George Street, Sydney.

Herman Finckh, Watchmaker and Jeweller, 300 George-street, is a native of Germany, and arrived in the colony in 1853. For a number of years he was engaged as a working jeweller, at first for the trade only; but after a visit to Europe in 1859 and 1860, he began business on his own account in York-street. The superior excellence of his work soon came to be known, and his circle of customers steadily increased, compelling him, time after time, to remove to more commodious premises. He exhibited at the Great Exhibition of London in 1862 a very beautiful bracelet and brooch, made by himself, of Australian gold. For this work of art he received a medal. Three of Mr. Finckh's sons have resided on the Continent of Europe for some years, and received there a thorough training in the latest developments of the jewellery and watch-making arts. They are now associated with their father in the business, carried on at the above address. A large and varied assortment of watches and jewellery is there kept in stock, and all descriptions of work pertaining to the trade is carried on.

Source: The Aldine Centennial History of New South Wales - W. Frederic Morrison - 1888

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Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Sep 27, 2011 2:38 pm

CHRISTIAN HAFER

462, George Street, Sydney.

Christian Hafer, Watchmaker and Jeweller, 462 George-street, was born in 1828 in Hanover, and there learned his trade of working jeweller. He landed in Sydney in 1857, and at once engaged himself to Mr. Hogarth, a well-known watchmaker and jeweller. In 1858 Mr. Hafer commenced business in Hunter-street, but in a few years afterwards removed to George-street, where he continued for twenty-one years. He then removed to his present premises in the same street. From a small beginning, his business has grown to be one of large dimensions, some of the leading tradesmen now carrying on for themselves in the colonies having graduated under his care. His business still consists to a considerable extent in the manufacture of jewellery and trophies, though it is also extensive in the sale of watches and general jewellery. Mr. Hafer is a married man, and is assisted in, his business by one of his sons.

Source: The Aldine Centennial History of New South Wales - W. Frederic Morrison - 1888

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Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Wed Sep 28, 2011 5:09 pm

FRANCIS ABBOTT

78, Murray Street, Hobart Town, Tasmania

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Francis Abbott - Hobart Town - 1861

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Francis Abbott - Hobart Town - 1865

Francis Abbott was another who did not arrive in Australia of his own free will, he was convicted in 1844 for theft at the Old Bailey and sentenced to transportation for seven years, see: http://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.j ... 40819-2046

Following a year of hard labour working in a chain gang, and then working as a servant, his was granted his Ticket of Leave and set up business as a Watchmaker in Hobart. He was later to achive fame as a Astronomer and Meteorologist.

Further reading: Explorers of the Southern Sky: A History of Australian Astronomy - Raymond Haynes - 1996


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Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Sep 30, 2011 4:52 pm

EDWARD PRESCOTT

52, Murray Street, Hobart Town.

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Edwd. Prescott - Hobart Town - 1865

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Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Thu Oct 06, 2011 3:02 pm

H. F. DELARUE AND CO.

378, George Street, Sydney.

H.F. Delarue & Co., Watchmakers and Jewellers, and Opticians, 378 Georgestreet.–This business was commenced by Mr. Delarue, a native of France, and trained there as a working jeweller, who after arrival worked for some time for the trade in Sydney, and began business on his own account in a small way about 1850; from this the concern has grown to be one of the most important in the city. It consists of watchmaking and the manufacture of jewellery, trophies, and plate, all of which are from their own designs. They also do an extensive trade in the manufacture of optical instruments, and employ in their work generally about twenty hands. The original proprietor being dead, the business is now conducted by his two sons and Mr. M. Goldring. Their stock is large and varied, comprising some of the best goods usually found in well-regulated establishments of this character.

Source: The Aldine Centennial History of New South Wales - W. Frederic Morrison - 1888

Silverly noted the following: H F Delarue was Hippolyte Felix Delarue.


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Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Oct 07, 2011 2:57 pm

ADOLPH KOPP

141 High-street, Fremantle.


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The business of Mr. A. O. Kopp, 141 High-street, Fremantle, has been established about ten years, and Is now a flourishing and steadily increasing one. The original place of business was at 135 High-street, and the premises then occupied were very insignificant compared with the present handsome and commodious building.

The ground floor is entirely taken up by the show-rooms, which present an attractive and tasteful array of watches, brooches, jewellery, ornamental clocks, and other articles pertaining to the watch-making and jewellery business. The stock of rings, watch-chains, and ornamental trinkets of every description is an especially valuable and artistic one, and not the least attractive items are the articles which are manufactured on the premises. The workshop is well fitted up, and contains a set of jewellers' toois of the very latest design and make. A feature is the patent rolling machine. There are also a furnace for smelting gold, a draw bench, and a sand blast. A large staff of competent workmen is kept constantly employed in repairing work, and in the manufacture of the various articles which are displayed. Besides manufacturing a large portion of his wares, Mr. Kopp also imports direct from the leading English and Continental manufacturers.

Mr. Adolph Kopp first came to Australia some fifteen years ago, and in Melbourne (Victoria) spent a considerable period as manager of a large wholesale house in that city. He came to Western Australia about 1881, and although at that time but scantily provided with funds, he has, by his enterprising efforts, succeeded in building up a business which compares favourably with any of its kind in the State.


Source: Twentieh Century Impressions of Western Australia - P. W. H. Thiel & Co. - 1901

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Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sat Oct 08, 2011 5:08 pm

JOHN WILLIAMSON

Collins Street, Hobart Town.

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John Williamson, Watch and Clock Maker, respectfully informs his friends and the public in general, that he has removed from his former residence in Macquiric Street to Mrs Rennies's opposite the Veranda House in Collins Street; where he continues to carry on the Watch, Clock, and Jewellery Business.
N.B. - Clocks and Watches repaired on the shortist Notice, and on the most moderate charges.


Source: Hobart Town Gazette - 4th September 1819

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