Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

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Re: Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

Postby dognose » Fri Nov 23, 2018 6:19 am

SAMUEL DORAN - (Chancellor & Son)

Dublin


A CAPTURE AT QUEENSTOWN

An elopement was brought to an unseemly end on Friday, at Cork. A working jeweller named Samuel Doran, aged about forty years, and a young woman of decidedly handsome countenance were amongst the passengers awaiting the arrival of the "Glasgow," the outward bound American steamer. They were both natives of Dublin, from which place they arrived in Queenstown on Thursday. Owing to the non-arrival of the steamer they were obliged to engage lodgings in the town, choosing for that purpose Robinson's Hotel, where they proceeded to pass the night. But, at an advanced hour two persons called at the hotel, and proceeded to make very solicitous inquiries after the truant pair. Those two individuals turned out to be policemen entrusted with the execution of a warrant for the apprehension of Doran, for the robbery of a large quantity of valuable jewellery from his employer (Mr. Chancellor), the proprietor of an extensive jewellery concern in Sackville-street, Dublin. He was immediately arrested and conveyed to the local Bridewell, from which he was removed to Dublin, there to answer the charge. On the detective opening the prisoner's box, it was found to contain a passage ticket by the "Glasgow," in the name of O'Connor—which name he had evidently assumed, a large number of gold and silver watches, amounting in all to over twenty, and some dozen pair of boots, believed to be the property of the fair inamorata's father, a boot and shoemaker. Doran, previous to his removal from Queenstown, was visited by his companion in flight, who wept bitterly at their designs of future happiness being thus untimely blasted. Both the prisoners were brought before the Dublin Bench on Saturday, and were remanded.


Source: The Monmouthshire Merlin and South Wales Advertiser - 21st January 1865

See: viewtopic.php?f=38&t=18350&p=85235&hilit=Chancellor#p85235

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Re: Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

Postby dognose » Mon Dec 10, 2018 3:33 pm

COSTIGAN

Ormond Quay, Dublin


DARING ROBBERY OF WATCHES

Between four and five o'clock on Thursday evening two men entered the shop of Mr. Costigan, jeweller and watchmaker, Ormond-quay, Dublin, and seizing a case of watches lying on the counter, made off with them before alarm could be given.


Source: The Cardiff and Merthyr Guardian - 30th November 1872

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Re: Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

Postby dognose » Wed Jan 02, 2019 1:15 pm

RICHARD TANTON REDFERN

Dublin


A jeweller, named Richard Tanton Redfern, has been remanded at the Dublin Police-court on a charge of bigamy. It appears that he married a young lady, named Snow, in London in 1857, and got a considerable fortune with her, and has a son seventeen years of age, and in November, 1872 he married a Miss O' Leary in Dublin, and got a fortune of £3,000 and considerably property with her.

Source: South Wales Daily News - 12th February 1875

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Re: Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

Postby dognose » Fri Feb 01, 2019 7:46 am

WILLIAM WATERS

2, Upper Georges Street, Kingstown, Dublin



Strange Story of Alleged Fraud

At Wexford on Thursday before Sir William Paul D. L. R. M. and M. A. Ennis to investigate a series of charges of obtaining goods under false pretenses preferred by District Inspector O'Neill F. Kelly against Leslie C. H. Leigh, until recently of Sion house, Kyle, County Wexford. The greatest possible local interest was centered in the proceedings as the defendant is connected by birth with most of the gentry of County Wexford and the court was crowded during the entire day.

Mr John R. Cooper S. C. S. prosecuted and the accused who had been in custody for some weeks back was not professionally represented. Mr J. McDowell, jeweler, Upper O'Connell street, Dublin, examined by Mr Cooper verified a deposition already made by him in the case, in which he deposed to having received a letter from the prisoner asking for a watch from him, which he got. Prisoner never remitted the price of the article to deponent. Prisoner represented himself as "Captain Leslie C. H. Leigh" and deponent swore that from inquiries he had made prisoner was never a captain In the army or navy.

A number of other witnesses having been examined, the bench returned the prisoner for trial to the next Wexford quarter sessions on the charge of obtaining goods by false pretenses from Mr McDowell.

The next charge heard was that of obtaining a bridle and saddle value £15 from Mr W. J. Conn of Belfast and evidence in suport of the charge was given by Mr Conn.

Prisoner was next charged with obtaining a gold hunting lever watch and some articles of jewelry value £25 15s from Mr William Waters, jeweler and optician, 2 Upper Georges street, Kingstown, with intent to defraud. Mr George Downing assistant to Mr Waters gave evidence.

The prisoner was next charged with obtaining by false pretenses forty pounds of grapes value £4 from Mr John Donegan, fruiterer, Blackroch,
evidence in suport of the charge being given by Mr James Donegan jr.

The next charge against the defendant was that he did on the 20th Sept. 1902 at Wexford unlawfully and by false pretenses obtain a set of brass
mounted harness value, £11 11s from Messrs John Robson Co., harness makers, Chichester street, Belfast. Mr Joseph Miller Bangor, County Down, manager of the firm gave evidence.

The prisoner was returned for trial to the next Wexford quarter sessions to each of the charges preferred against him as also on a charge of obtaining a quantity of slates value £8 8s 6d from the Ormonde Slate Quarry company, Carrick-on-Suir by false pretenses on or about Oct 28.


Source: Dublin Weekly Freeman - 27th December 1902


The 1901 Irish Census records William Waters as 56 year-old, Caithness, Scotland born, Watchmaker. He is married to 37 year-old, Ardrossan, Scotland born, Anges. They reside a 13, Spencer Villas, Kingstown, which is recorded in the census as a private dwelling. They have one live-in servant. The couple's religion was recorded as Presbyterian.

The 1911 Irish Census records similar detail, with the exception that William is recorded as 66 and Agnes is 57 years old. They reside at the same address and the census states that the couple have been married for 27 years, had three children, but only one living.

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Re: Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

Postby dognose » Fri Feb 01, 2019 2:46 pm

GEORGE DOWNING

Dublin


Mentioned in the above post regarding William Waters.

The 1901 Irish Census records George Downing as a 17 year-old, Dublin born Grocer's Assistant. He lives with his parents, John, born in England, and Margerate, born in Co. Monaghan, and younger brother, William. They reside at 12, Harbour Road, Dublin. George's religion was recorded as Methodist. He is unmarried.

The 1911 Irish Census records George as a 27 year-old 'Clerk at Watchmakers Jewellers'. He lives with his widowed mother, now recorded as 'Margaret' at 1, Harbour Road, Dublin. George is still unmarried.

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Re: Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

Postby dognose » Tue Feb 05, 2019 1:12 pm

THOMAS BRUNKER

31, South William Street, later, 111, Grafton Street, Dublin


FALL OF ANOTHER HOUSE IN DUBLIN

At about nine o'clock the other night the house No. 111, Grafton-street, Dublin, owned by Mr. Brunker, an extensive jeweller, fell to the ground. The adjoining house (110) had been taken down, and in the process the foundation of Brunker's is supposed to have been weakened. About seven o'clock, after the shop was closed, an ominous crack was beard, announcing that the large plate-glass window had given way but all belonging to the establishment had gone home, and there were heavy iron shutters in front of the window, so that nothing could be done to save the stock. The crack, however, warned the police to keep the street comparatively clear, and this precaution prevented, perhaps, a great loss of life. The front wall fell outwards, and a beam struck a tramcar which was passing, but did not break through the roof, on which happily there were no passengers. The conductor received a slight blow from a brick. The whole of the large stock of plate, watches, and jewellery is buried in the ruins, and as all the smaller articles were loose in the shop, most of them will never be recovered.


Source: The Cardigan Observer - 4th October 1879


Common Pleas Division, Dublin, (Before the LORD CHIEF JUSTICE.) BRUNKER v. NORTH.--THE EASEMENT OF SUPPORT.

This case, which is an action by Mr. Thomas Brunker, jeweller, to recover damages from Mr. James H. North, house and estate agent, for damages sustained by the plaintiff through the alleged negligence of the defendant, whereby the house of the plaintiff, No. 110 Grafton Street, fell, while the house adjoining it was being rebuilt for the defendant. Messrs. Meade & Son, builders, had, on the application of Mr. North, been made co-defendants. On the case being called, Mr. DAMES, Q.C., applied for a postponement of the trial on account of the unavoidable absence of a material and necessary witness, Mr. Bridgford, the architect, from whom, counsel said, their solicitor had that morning received a telegram stating that it was impossible for him to be in Dublin for the next four or five days. Mr. HOLMES, Q.C., on behalf of the defendant, Mr, North, said his client was ready to go on, but would not oppose the application provided that the plaintiff agreed to bear the costs of the day. Mr. DAMES said he could not object to that. The CHIEF JUSTICE was about to make the order postponing the case, when Mr. HERON, Q.C., who appeared for Messrs. Meade, asked that the costs of his clients should also be paid by the plaintiff. He contended that there was no sufficient cause for postponement shown. Mr. DAMES said that the only defendant, so far as Mr. Brunker was concerned, was Mr. North, and he objected to paying any costs except those of Mr. North. Mr. HERON submitted that Messrs. Meade were defendants on the record, and, as they were ready and willing to go on, the trial should not be postponed. The CHIEF JUSTICE said that Mr. Heron had a right to be heard against the postponement. Mr. DAMES said that their solicitor would make an affidavit to the effect which he had already mentioned, and he would them formally apply to have the case postponed. A short adjournment then took place, and the affidavit was sworn. It was to the effect that Mr. Bridgford had left Dublin for the Continent upwards of a month ago; that Mr. Rosenthal had endeavoured to obtain his address, but without avail, until Saturday, when he learned that it was in Bury Street, London. He had immediately communicated with him, and he had received in reply the telegram from Bournemouth, of which he now made an exhibit to the Court, and which stated that Mr. Bridgford had only returned from the Continent, and that he greatly regretted that he could not be in Dublin for the next five days. Mr. ANDREWS, Q.C., said Messrs. Meade were perfectly ready to go on. The postponement of the trial would involve Messrs. Meade in considerable expense through no fault of their own. When the case was in the list for the day the plaintiff asked his Lordship to exercise his jurisdiction in his favour—to do what would be a most unjust thing to Messrs. Meade. He submitted that the affidavit showed no cause for postponement, and therefore his Lordship should only grant it on condition of his (Mr. Andrews's) clients’ costs being paid by the plaintiff. Mr. HERON said if Mr. Bridgford was subpoenaed he was bound to attend, and no reason was shown why he would not be able to attend on the next day. Bournemouth was only 33 hours from London, and there was nothing to hinder him from reaching London in time that evening, and, starting by the night mail, reach Dublin in the morning. Mr. DAMES said that was absurd, as they had only communication with him by wire. Mr. HERON submitted that the affidavit disclosed no legal grounds for the postponement. The CHIEF JUSTICE did not think the affidavit was quite satisfactory. Still Mr. Brunker had no action against Mr. Meade at all. Mr. HOLMES said that if Mr. Heron considered it for his interest to go on, he (Mr. Holmes) was perfectly ready. The CHIEF JUSTICE said he could only give one set of costs, unless the plaintiff would consent to pay both. Mr. HOLMES said if they were not to get their costs he would resist the postponement. After some further discussion, The CHIEF JUSTICE said he was rather disposed not to postpone the motion. Mr. DAMES: If your Lordship forces us on in the face of this affidavit, everybody will see how it is. I will go on, and do my best. The Court then adjourned, and on resuming, Mr. Dames, for the plaintiff, consented to pay the costs of both defendants, and the trial was adjourned to November.


Source: The Architect - 3rd July 1880


Thomas Brucker (b.2-1-1821 d.1901) was noted as an exhibitor at the Irish National Exhibition in 1852.

He was granted Freedom in 1845 and elected Warden 1848-51 and Master of the Dublin Company of Goldsmiths in 1851-52.

His residence in 1851 was noted as 28, Northumberland Road, Dublin.

The 1901 Irish Census records Thomas Brunker as an 80 year-old, Dublin born, Justice of the Peace. He resides at 11, Cambridge Terrace, Dublin, with three of his daughters and one son. He has four live-in servants, including a nurse. His religion was recorded as Church of Ireland. Thomas Brunker died in the same year as the census was taken.

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Re: Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

Postby dognose » Fri Mar 08, 2019 2:24 am

JOSEPH W. MAIBEN & Co.

11, Westland Row, Dublin


Image
Joseph M. Maiben & Co. - Dublin - 1911

The 1911 Irish Census records Joseph Motherwell Maiben as a 32 year-old, Dublin born, Laboratory Furnisher. He is married to 29 year-old, Belfast born, Florence Elizabeth and the couple have a new-born baby girl, Margaret Catherine. They reside at 15, Oaklands Park, Dublin, which is described in the census as a private dwelling. The family have one live-in servant. Joseph's religion was recorded as Church of Ireland and Florence's, Roman Catholic. At the time of the census, Joseph and Florence had been married 14 months.

The marriage of Joseph M. Maiben and Florence Elizabeth Burns was registered in Roscrea district, Co. Tipperary, in the quarter ended March 1910.

Joseph Motherwell Maiben died at Dublin in 1953, he is buried at Glasnevin Cemetery.

Florence Elizabeth Maiben died at Dublin in 1956, she is buried at Glasnevin Cemetery.

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Re: Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

Postby dognose » Fri Mar 15, 2019 4:47 am

KATE NOLAN

37, Donnybrook, Co. Dublin, and 84, Bathmore Terrace, Cork

Noted as an exhibitor at the Royal Jubilee Exhibition held at Manchester in 1887, where she displayed:

Machine for making Hair Jewellery. Bouquet of Flowers made of Human Hair. Ear-rings, Finger-rings, Bracelets, Albert and Guard
Chains, made of Human Hair.


Source: Royal Jubilee Exhibition, Manchester 1887 : Official Catalogue - 1887

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Re: Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

Postby dognose » Mon Apr 15, 2019 1:09 pm

JOSEPH BERINGER

36, North Street, Belfast


Image
Joseph Beringer - Belfast - 1908

See: viewtopic.php?f=38&t=18350&p=103230&hilit=beringer#p103230

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Re: Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

Postby dognose » Wed Apr 24, 2019 4:16 am

J. LIZARS

8, Wellington Place, Belfast


Image
J. Lizars - Belfast - 1908


The firm of J. Lizars, carrying on business as opticians and camera manufacturers at 101-7, Buchanan Street, Glasgow, has been dissolved by the retiral therefrom of Robert Ballantine, one of the partners. The business will continue to be carried on by Arthur Ballantine and Matthew Ballantine, jun., on their own account, and under the same name of J. Lizars. Mr Robert Ballantine will carry on business on his own account It should be noted that although Mr. Matthew Ballantine, sen., has now retired from the business, the said firm will, however, be carried on in all respects as heretofore by his two sons, Arthur Ballantine and Matthew Ballantine, jun., as above indicated. Mr. Matthew Ballantine, sen., however, still preserves his interest in the respective firms of J. Lizars, Belfast, and J. Lizars, Edinburgh.

Source: The Amateur Photographer and Photographic News - 9th June 1908

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Re: Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

Postby dognose » Tue Jun 18, 2019 1:07 pm

KATHLEEN QUIGLY

Dublin


An example of the work of Kathleen Quigly, a student at the Dublin Metropolitan School of Art in 1916:

Image

The 1911 Irish Census records Kathleen Quigly as a 23 year-old, Dublin born, Art Student. She is the daughter of Richard Quigly, a Civil Engineer, and his wife, Elizabeth. The family reside at 25, Kimmage Road, Dublin. The family's religion was recorded as Roman Catholic.

The family appear to be well-travelled, with one of Kathleen's sisters being born in London, and the other at Palermo, Sicily.


Wikipedia entry:

Kathleen Quigly (6 March 1888 – 15 August 1981) was an Irish stained glass artist, illustrator, and painter. She was also a metal worker and jewellery designer.

Kathleen Quigly was born in Dublin on 6 March 1888. Her father was Richard Quigly, a civil engineer. In her early childhood she travelled abroad with her family. She then attended the Central School of Arts and Crafts in London and then entered the Dublin Metropolitan School of Art around 1906. There she studied under the school's first stained glass master, Alfred E. Child, discovering a talent for illuminating glass. She went on to occasionally work with An Túr Gloine under Sarah Purser. She showed a copper cup and stand at the 1910 exhibition of the Arts and Crafts Society of Ireland while she was still a student. In 1911 she contributed pages to the illuminated album with panels and borders of Celtic ornament, Address of welcome to Queen Mary from the women of Ireland. She exhibited with the Royal Hibernian Academy (RHA) in 1917 with two works, and was living at 5 Clareville Road, Dublin. The same year she showed a wood-block print, Girl with two lamps, with the Arts and Crafts Society. By 1917, Quigly was a member of the Guild of Irish Artworkers, representing the Guild on the council of the Arts and Crafts Society of Ireland in 1917.

Quigly began working for Harry Clarke in January 1919, at his studios in North Frederick Street, becoming a full employee in October 1921. Said by some to have been his most valuable assistant, she worked with Clarke until 1924, working on St Stephen's window in a church in Gorey, County Wexford and the Angel of peace and hope window in Holy Trinity church, Killiney, County Dublin. She created three windows for the dolls house, Titania's Palace. Her most notable work she created with Clarke is the Eve of St Agnes, when it was shown at the Aonach Tailteann art exhibition in August 1924 it won a trophy gold medal. The window is now display at the Hugh Lane Gallery.

At the 1925 Arts and Crafts exhibition, Quigly exhibited the Annunciation window, while also helping to organise the exhibition. In the same year she showed three works with the RHA and was living at 14 Westmoreland Street. Between 1930 and 1934, she exhibited a further 7 works with the RHA. She continued to create commissions, including windows for the treasure house of Eu Tong Sen, a wealthy Singapore merchant, in 1927 she completed a window for the chapel at the Sacred Heart Convent, Newton, near Boston, Massachusetts, and in 1929 she created three of the decorative borders of the official handbook for Dublin civic week.

In 1932 she showed on portrait and four stained-glass panels at the Oireachtas art exhibition. After this Quigly emigrated to South Africa, where she lived for the rest of her life. At first she painted, exhibiting with Transvaal art society and the South African Academy in Johannesburg in 1935, 1936, and 1939. She began working with A. L. Watson in a stained glass studio after she settled in Johannesburg. From there she made over a hundred windows, and during the 1950s she is thought to be the only female stained glass artist in South Africa. She retired to Rhodesia, and died in Marandellas on 15 August 1981.

She is often listed as Kathleen Quigley, but she always signed her name as Quigly. Some of her etching were included in The Ava Gallery 2014 exhibition, Irish Women Artists 1870–1970.



Dictionary of Irish Biography entry:

Quigly, Kathleen
by Bridget Hourican

Quigly, Kathleen (1888–1981), artist, was born 6 March 1888 in Dublin, daughter of Richard Quigly, civil engineer. After travelling abroad with her family in her early years, she attended the Central School of Arts and Crafts in London, and enrolled c.1906 in the Dublin Metropolitan School of Art. Under Alfred Ernest Child, the school's first stained-glass master, she discovered a talent for illuminating glass and began working occasionally at the Túr Gloine, a cooperative artists’ workshop founded by Sarah Purser and Edward Martyn in 1903. While still a student, she showed a copper cup and stand, decorated with figures and trees in enamel, for the fourth exhibition of the Arts and Crafts Society of Ireland (1910), and the following year contributed pages to the ‘Address of welcome to Queen Mary from the women of Ireland’, an illuminated album consisting of panels and borders of colourful Celtic ornament. She first exhibited at the RHA in 1917, showing two works from her address at 5 Clareville Road, Dublin. That year she also contributed a wood-block print, ‘Girl with two lamps’, to the arts and crafts exhibition.

In January 1919 she began working for Harry Clarke in his studios in North Frederick St., and by October 1921 was entered as a full employee. Reckoned his most valued assistant, she remained with him till 1924 and worked on numerous projects, including the ‘Angel of peace and hope’ window in Holy Trinity church, Killiney, Co. Dublin, and the St Stephen's window in a church in Gorey, Co. Wexford. A lantern with the signs of the zodiac, which she executed to Clarke's design, was shown at the 1921 arts and crafts exhibition; and she provided three windows for Sir Neville Wilkinson's miniature masterpiece, ‘Titania's palace’ (1907–22), now in Denmark. Her most celebrated work with Clarke was the ‘Eve of St Agnes’ window, designed for a site in Ailesbury Road. Divided into two sections and twenty-two panels, it illustrated Keats's poem and created a sensation when it was shown in August 1924 at the Aonach Tailteann art exhibition, where it won a trophy gold medal. The Irish Times (7 Aug. 1924) called it a ‘revel in blue’, and Thomas Bodkin wrote of its ‘microscopic delicacy and dazzling richness of hue’ (The Studio, lxxxix, 164). It is located in Dublin City Gallery the Hugh Lane.

An ‘Annunciation’ window was shown at the 1925 arts and crafts exhibition, which she helped organise. That year she showed three works, one of them priced at £3.10s., at the RHA from an address at 14 Westmoreland St., Dublin. Never a prolific exhibitor, she showed only seven more works at the RHA between 1930 and 1934. Her commissions continued to be interesting: in 1926 she completed windows, depicting scenes from Greek mythology, for the treasure house of Eu Tong Sen, a wealthy Singapore merchant; another window was designed for the chapel at the Sacred Heart Convent, Newton, near Boston, Massachusetts, in 1927, and two years later she was responsible for three of the decorative borders in the official handbook for Dublin civic week. One border had an inset of the Rotunda hospital.

After showing five works – one portrait and four stained-glass panels – at the Oireachtas art exhibition in 1932, she emigrated two years later to South Africa, where she spent the rest of her life. Working initially as a painter, she exhibited in the South African Academy in Johannesburg in 1935, 1936, and 1939, and also showed with the Transvaal art society. Settling in Johannesburg, she began working with A. L. Watson in a stained-glass studio situated in a dingy suburb, and made in total over a hundred windows, including a window depicting Elizabeth of Hungary for the chapel at Groote Schuur hospital, Cape Town. During the 1950s she was said to be the only stained-glass woman artist in South Africa. Retiring to Rhodesia, she died 15 August 1981 in Marandellas. Although her name often appears as ‘Quigley’, she signed it ‘Quigly’.


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Re: Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

Postby dognose » Wed Jul 24, 2019 3:20 am

LOUIS KERR

Enniscorthy and Wexford


Image
Louis Kerr - Enniscorthy and Wexford - 1972

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Re: Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

Postby dognose » Sun Sep 15, 2019 5:27 am

JAMES J. BURKE

Dublin


An example of the work of James J. Burke, a student at the Dublin Metropolitan School of Art in 1916:

Image

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Re: Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

Postby dognose » Thu Sep 19, 2019 1:11 pm

ARTHUR IRWIN

37, later, 44, Roches Street, Limerick


The 1901 Irish Census records Arthur Irwin as a 50-year-old, Co. Donegal born watchmaker. He is married to 45-year-old, Co. Limerick born Kate. The couple live with their three sons and three daughters, John J., aged 23 years, a watchmaker; Arthur J., aged 22 years, a watchmaker; Edward, aged 12 years, a Scholar; Mary K., aged 24 years, Shop Attendant; Susan, aged 19 years, Scholar; and Ellen, aged 15 years, Scholar. All of the children were born in Limerick city. The family reside at 44, Roches Street, Limerick, which is described in the census as a shop. Arthur Irwin's religion was recorded as Protestant Irish Church, but the rest of the family were Roman Catholic.

The 1911 Irish Census records Arthur as now being aged 60, and born at Rathkeale, which is in Co. Limerick. Still living with their parents are Susan, Ellen, and Edward, now described as a watchmaker.

Arthur Irwin established his business in 1870.

Edward Irwin is likely to be 'Ned' Irwin, who was known to have continued the business following the death of Arthur. Ned was followed by his son, Pat.

Joseph Irwin, and his brother, John J., started in business on their own account as 'Irwin Brothers' (separate post to follow).

For many years there where three separate 'Irwin' jewellery businesses in Limerick.

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Re: Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

Postby dognose » Fri Sep 20, 2019 11:46 am

IRWIN BROTHERS

22, Patrick Street, Limerick


The 1901 Irish Census records Joseph Irwin as a 20-year-old, Limerick city born Jeweller. He is single and living with his sister, Susan, at 22, Patrick Street, which is described in the census as a shop. His religion is recorded as Roman Catholic.

The 1911 Irish Census records Joseph A. Irwin as a 28-year-old, Limerick city born Jeweller. He is single and resides alone at 22, Patrick Street, which is described in the census as a shop. His religion is recorded as Roman Catholic.

Irwin Brothers, the business of Joseph and John Irwin, who were two of the sons of Arthur Irwin (see above post), were established in 1897. Sometime in the 1920's, John left the partnership and went to Dublin, where he continued to work in the trade. Joseph continued alone until joined by one of his three sons, Charles, in 1940. The business was later continued by one of Charles' twin sons, Edward, who joined the firm in 1984 until the business closed in 2011.

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Irwin Bros. - Limerick - 1910

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Irwin Bros. - Limerick - 1914

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Irwin Bros. - Limerick - 1926

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Irwin Bros. - Limerick - 1993

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Re: Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

Postby dognose » Tue Sep 24, 2019 1:37 pm

J.H. IRWIN

6, Patrick Street, Limerick


The 1901 Irish Census records John Henry Irwin as a 65-year-old, County Mayo born Watchmaker. He is a widower, and lives with his son, John H., aged 27 years, also a Watchmaker, and daughters, Ellen 28, Jane 23, and Emily 20 years-of-age. All the children were born in County Limerick. The family reside at 6, Patrick Street, Limerick, which is described in the census as a shop. Their religion is recorded as Irish Church.

The 1911 Irish Census records John Henry Irwin as 70-years-old and living with daughter Ellen at 6, Patrick Street. The census records that John Henry Irwin was married for 40 years, had seven children, of whom 4 were living.

The 1911 Irish Census records John Henry Irwin (Jnr.) as 36-years-old and living with his wife, 36-years-old County Limerick born, May. The couple have two sons, John H., 3 and Richard B.,1-year-old. The family reside at 11, Thomas Street, Limerick, and have been married three years. The family's religion was recorded as Church of Ireland.


John Henry Irwin (Sen.) died in August 1918.


Deaths

Irwin, Jane Evelyn, Bray, Co. Wicklow, daughter of late J. H. Irwin, 6 Patrick Street, Limerick.


Source: Limerick Chronicle - 11th September 1920


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J.H. Irwin - Limerick - 1926


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Guys Limerick Directory - 1914

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Cork-Munster Trade Directory - 1930


JH Irwin Jewellers is still in business today and now located at Williamscourt Mall, William Street, Limerick. The business was in the hands of the Irwin family for six generations before being acquired by a former employee, Eleanor O'Brien, in 1992.

Image

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Re: Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

Postby dognose » Fri Sep 27, 2019 3:01 pm

N. FINE

42, O'Connell Street, Limerick


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N. Fine - Limerick - 1926

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N. Fine - Limerick - 1966

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Louis Fine Ltd. - Limerick - 1993

Established by Nathaniel Fine and later the business of Louis Fine. Still in business today.

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Re: Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

Postby dognose » Tue Oct 01, 2019 1:53 pm

STEEL & SONS

113, Royal Avenue, Belfast


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Steel & Sons, Limited, Electro-plate Manufacturers, Gold and Silversmiths, Watch and Clock Makers, Jewellers, Opticians, &c., 113, Royal Avenue, Belfast.—Unquestionably one of the most notable houses in its line of operations in Ireland is that of Messrs. Steel & Sons, Limit id, of the Irish Electro-plate Works, Royal Avenue, Belfast. This important concern has been in active and prosperous existence for upwards of thirty years, Mr. Matthew C. Steel having entered it in the year 1860. He was joined by his sons in 1871, when the name Steel & Sons was assumed, and in 1885 the business was converted into a limited company under the present title. The firm formerly carried on their trade at 39, Ann Street, but in 1887 they took possession of the fine premises they now occupy in Royal Avenue. This large and commodious establishment comprises four lofty storeys, the ground floor containing a very handsome shop or sale-room, with a frontage of thirty feet and measuring fifty feet in length from front to rear. Behind this shop is located the electro-plating department, which is most perfectly appointed with power machinery, and all the necessary appliances for this highly interesting art-industry. During the last three years Messrs. Steel & Sons, Limited, have greatly extended the scope of their operations as electro-plate manufacturers, and they now enjoy an eminent reputation in this branch, producing goods of great beauty and merit in design, execution and material quality. Over the shop we find, on three sides, balcony show-rooms displaying a large and varied stock of jewellery trade tools, watch glasses innumerable, and all manner of materials and requisites for the watch, clock, and jewellery trades, in which lines this house is recognised as a leading concern. These balconies add greatly to the fine appearance of the establishment, and produce a capital effect when viewed from the shop. The second floor forms a very large show-room for clocks, French and American goods in this branch being extensively represented, and there is also shown here a superb assortment of bronzes, electro-plated wares and other artistic products for which the firm are justly celebrated. In this part of the premises, also are situated the offices, the jobbing department, and the burnishing room where electro-plate is burnished and made ready for sale after being plated in the shops on the ground floor. The third floor contains store and packing rooms, watch-making department, &c., and here has been very successfully introduced the “ Boley ” machine for watch manufacture, which ensures accurate “ centreing,” gives greater correctness in all work, and saves a lot of time and labour. On the fourth floor jewellers’ and silver-smiths’ work is carried on to a very large and comprehensive extent, the skilled workmen employed being assisted by many improved and effective apparatus. Some splendid machinery is also in use for the optical and engraving work in which the firm so extensively and successfully engage. A large staff is employed in all departments, and the entire establishment is as completely equipped and organised as any place of the kind we have had the pleasure of visiting. It is quite clear that Messrs. Steel & Sons, Limited, control a very large and superior trade, and they are widely noted for their high-class specialities in optical goods, the requirements of all who suffer from defective eyesight being very carefully studied in the spectacle and eye-glass department. The firm have also won a deserved reputation for their masonic jewellery, which is a special feature marked by great elegance of design, correctness in detail, and beauty of finish. Their importations of French and American clocks, bronzes, marbles, and other similar art wares, and their productions in electro¬plated goods, command unqualified approval, and place them among the foremost firms in these important departments. Press opinions and a host of testimonials speak for the position this house has gained in the favour of the public and the trade; and great credit is due to the Messrs. Steel for the practical ability and exemplary enterprise which have placed them in control of one of the most attractive and interesting establishments in Belfast.

Source: The Industries of Ireland - 1891

See: http://www.925-1000.com/forum/viewtopic ... eel#p73661

and: http://www.925-1000.com/forum/viewtopic ... el#p172874

and: http://www.925-1000.com/forum/viewtopic ... st#p148627

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dognose
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Re: Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

Postby dognose » Fri Oct 25, 2019 2:01 pm

J.J. KENNEALLY - J.J. KENNEALLY & SONS

45, Wickham Street, Limerick


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J.J. Kennrally - Limerick - 1966

Established in April 1959 by J.J. Kenneally who served his apprenticeship with Cromer's Jewellers on O'Connell Street, Limerick. Sons Fergus, Clive, and Robbie, joined the business in 1982, 1987, and 1999, respectively. J.J. Kenneally passed away in April 2018. This family firm are still in business today and at the same address.

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dognose
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Posts: 40650
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Re: Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

Postby dognose » Wed Dec 04, 2019 2:37 pm

C.V. COWPAR & SON

51a, Upper William Street, Limerick


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C.V. Cowpar & Son - Limerick - 1957

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C.V. Cowpar & Son - Limerick - 1960

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C.V. Cowpar & Son - Limerick - 1962

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C.V. Cowpar & Son - Limerick - 1964

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C.V. Cowpar & Son - Limerick - 1970

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