Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

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dognose
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Re: Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

Postby dognose » Wed Feb 28, 2018 10:02 am

THE STANDARD WATCH AND CLOCK COMPANY

10, Bridge Street, Camden Quay, Cork


Description of JOSEPH AARONSON, native of Russia, who stands charged with having, on the 13th September, 1893, in the barony of Cork, parish of St. Ann's, Shandon, absconded, taking with him a quantity of watches and jewellery, value for £50, the property of his employers, The Standard Watch and Clock Company, 10, Bridge-street, Cork :— Blue eyes, regular nose, dark complexion, regular face, medium make, 5 feet 5 inches high, about 23 years of age, dark hair; wore a dark coat, trowsers, and vest; is a travelling jeweller. Is a Jew, and may be accompanied by his brother, who has a cast in one eye, and mends clocks. Cork, North, 16th Sept., 1893.

Source: The Police Gazette or Hue-And-Cry - 6th October 1893


The above premises were destroyed by fire on the evening of 9th October 1895:

JEWELLER’S SHOP DESTROYED. A most disastrous fire occurred last evening at 10 Bridge street, corner of Camden quay, the house occupied by the Standard Watch and Clock Company, who have only been short time occupying it...........

Source: Cork Constitution - 10th October 1895

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Re: Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

Postby dognose » Fri Mar 09, 2018 1:56 pm

JOSEPH WILLIAMS

Ship Quay Street, Londonderry


Image
Joseph Williams - Londonderry - 1850

Joseph Williams is recorded in I. Slater's National Commercial Directory of Ireland - 1846

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Re: Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

Postby dognose » Wed Mar 21, 2018 12:28 pm

EDWARD GILBERT

43, High Street, Belfast


Image
Edward Gilbert - Belfast - 1849

Image
Edward Gilbert - Belfast - 1852

Trev.

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Re: Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

Postby dognose » Sun Apr 08, 2018 5:25 am

LEE & SON

57, High Street, Belfast


Image
Lee and Son - Belfast - 1852

Lee & Son advertised in 1849 that they were telescope makers to the Honourable Commissioners of Customs, agents for Messrs. Parkinson & Frodsham's chronometers, and sole agents in Ireland for M. Vidi's Patent Aneroid Barometers.

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Re: Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

Postby dognose » Sat Apr 28, 2018 7:44 am

EUGENE O'CALLAGHAN

2, Bridge Street, Bantry, Co. Cork


The 1901 Irish Census records Eugene O'Callaghan as a 67 year-old, County Cork born, Watch Maker Jobber. He is married to 61 year-old, Cork City born, Mary. They live with their three children, Daniel, 21, described as a Watch Maker Jobber, Joseph, 19, described as a Watch Maker Apprentice, and William, 16, also described as a Watch Maker Apprentice. All three sons were born in Cork City and are unmarried. The family reside at 2, Bridge Street, Bantry, which is described in the census as a jeweller's shop. Their religion was recorded as Roman Catholic.

The family do not appear to be recorded in the 1911 Irish Census.

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Re: Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

Postby dognose » Sat Apr 28, 2018 2:22 pm

WILLIAM O'CALLAGHAN

2, Bridge Street, Bantry, Co. Cork

See: viewtopic.php?f=38&t=18350&p=155857&hilit=o%27callaghan#p155857


SHOT WHILE BOATING

A young man named William O'Callaghan, son of a jeweller and silversmith, of Bantry, who was out boating in the harbour with his mother, was fatally shot while in the vicinity of Chapel Island, by Mr. Roscoe, an English gentleman, connected with the Barytes mines in the district. Mr. Roscoe and his brother were on one side of the island in a boat, when the former fired with a rifle at a gull across the promontory. The bird was shot, but unfortunately the bullet hit O'Callaghan, whose boat was not visible to the Roscoes. O'Callaghan died immediately.


Source: The County Observer and Monmouthshire Advertiser - 27th July 1907

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Re: Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

Postby dognose » Mon Jun 25, 2018 4:07 am

...... GORDON

Cavan, County Cavan


FATAL DRUNKEN ORGIE

On Saturday, at Cavan, a watchmaker named Gordon was found dead in his bedroom, and an army pensioner named Reilly lay unconscious in the same room. Reilly is in hospital suffering from alcoholic poisoning, and Gordon's death resulted from the same cause.


Source: Cardiff Times and South Wales Weekly News - 12th March 1892

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Re: Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

Postby dognose » Sun Jul 29, 2018 1:26 pm

WEHRLY BROTHERS

2 & 3 O'Connell Street, Sligo


Image
Wehrly Brothers - Sligo - 1952


Wehrly Brothers were established by Adolph, Edward and Bartholomew Wehrly in 1875. They were clockmakers from the Black Forest region of Germany, and opened their first premises at Quay Street, and then at High Street, were they remained until 1900. Around the turn of the century, Bartholomew returned to Germany and the remaining two brothers opened a new shop at a premises at 3 Knox Street, now O'Connell Street, Sligo.

Edward died leaving no children, but Adolph had two sons, Frederick, who was a noted watchmaker and had spent time working for Rolex before coming back to work in the family business, and Edward, and it was they, along with Adolph's wife, Anastacia, who took over the running of the firm in the mid 1930's. Frederick died in 1978, and Edward in 2001.

By the 1980's the business was in the hand's of Edward's son, Tony. In the 1980's Wehrly Brothers acquired the adjoining premises at No. 2, O'Connell Street, that was formerly Young's Medical Hall.

Wehrly Brothers are still in business today.

Image

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dognose
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Re: Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

Postby dognose » Sun Jul 29, 2018 1:53 pm

A Listing of Jewellers and Watchmakers Working in Sligo in 1906:

Carroll, B. - Castle Street
Clancy, P.D. - Ratcliffe Street
Irvine, Robert - Ratcliffe Street
Maurer, Albert - High Street
Nelson, Francis - Castle Street
Wehrly Bros. - O'Connell Street


Source: Kilgannon's Almanac For North Connaught - 1906

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Re: Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

Postby dognose » Mon Aug 06, 2018 9:57 am

GERTZ

Grafton Street, Dublin


Extensive Fire in Dublin

A fire of considerable magnitude broke out on Monday in Grafton-street, Dublin. The fire appears to have originated in the cellars of Messrs. Lambert, Brien, and Co.'s oil stores and candle manufactory. Seizing on a quantity of inflammable materials, the flames spread rapidly. The fire brigade soon arrived, but, abandoning all hopes of saving the burning building, solely devoted their attention to stopping the fire from spreading to the adjoining premises. In a short time barrels of oil began to explode, and the flames gradually became fiercer and fiercer, till one by one all the floors of the house had fallen in. At two o'clock the fire had spread to Messrs. Robinson's photographic establishment, which within a short time was in a state of ruin. The fire quickly spread to the neighbouring premises, but at half-past three the brigade had the fire greatly under control. The damage done is very great, the extensive establishments of Messrs. Lambert, chandlers, Robinson, photographer, and Gertz, jeweller, being totally destroyed. Large numbers, including the Lord Mayor, visited the scene of the fire. No serious accidents are reported, but a few persons had very narrow escapes.


Source: The Weekly Mail - 13th August 1887

Possibly a mis-print with the name 'Gertz', perhaps the above report refers to Henry A. 'Gerty'. See: viewtopic.php?f=38&t=18350&p=145993&hilit=gerty#p145993

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David Cooke.
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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the 20th Century

Postby David Cooke. » Sun Sep 02, 2018 9:24 am

dognose wrote:G.B. COOKE

Wexford

Image

Image
G.B. Cooke - Wexford - 1903

Trev.

That was my grandfather George Blackwell Cooke,he died in 1937.

dognose
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Re: Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

Postby dognose » Sun Sep 02, 2018 9:52 am

Hi David,

Welcome to the Forum.

Many thanks for the added information.

Trev.

dognose
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Re: Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

Postby dognose » Wed Sep 05, 2018 4:20 am

IRISH SOUVENIR & JEWELLERY Co. Ltd.

180a, Parnell Street, Dublin


What is likely to be the work and mark of the Irish Souvenir & Jewellery Co. Ltd.:

Image
I.S.J - Dublin - 1983

The Irish Souvenir & Jewellery Co. Ltd. registered their mark, 'I.S.J' incuse, with the Edinburgh Assay Office in 1972 and 1974. The partners in the firm were recorded as: Desmond McDonnell, Philip James McDonnell and Etta McDonnell.

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dognose
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Re: Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

Postby dognose » Tue Oct 16, 2018 1:13 pm

SIEGMUND KINDLER

Belfast and Manchester



ACTRESS'S LOST JEWELS

Charges Against Manchester Men

At the City Police-court, Manchester, yesterday, Harry Black, a barman, described as of Gardner-street, West Gorton, was charged on remand with housebreaking, and Siegmund Kindler, who carries an business as a jeweller in Oxford-street, was charged with receiving stolen property.

On the 22nd ult. a house in Upper Brook-street, occupied by a Mrs. Caroline Garrett, an actress appearing in the Theatre Royal; pantomime, but who declines to give her stage name, was broken into. The house was left secure by the occupants prior to their departure for the theatre; but on returning, about 11.30 p.m., they were surprised to find that the place had been entered. A search was made, and on going into the bedroom upstairs the jewellery box was found lying on the floor. The contents of the box were missing, with the exception of two diamond ear-rings. The property that was missing was valued at about £100. The police were informed, and Detectives Allan and Hough investigated the case. The officers, from something they heard, paid a visit to a house in Gardner-street, Gorton, and took the prisoner Black into custody. The latter gave such information to the officers that they were able to recover the greater portion of the stolen jewellery, consisting of a gold watch, gold crucifix, diamond cross, diamond swallow brooch, and two gold rings, which were concealed in a cupboard under the gas meter in the front room of the house. Other articles, which were identified by the prosecutrix as her property, were also found in a house in Brampton-street, Stockport-road. The officers, on the 25th ult., went to the shop of Kindler, and found certain stones, which the prosecution allege were removed from a ring sold to him by Black.

Detective Allan said that since the prisoners had been remanded the safe at Kindler's house I had been found to contain two watch movements, numbered respectively 4,835 and 8,227, i which it is believed have been stolen, and the police asked for a remand in order that the owners might be found.

Prisoners were each remanded for a week, an application by Mr. Hockin for bail for the prisoner Kindler being refused.


Source: Evening Express - 5th February 1902


ACTRESS'S JEWELS

Stolen by a Barman at Manchester

JEWELLER SENT TO PRISON FOR RECEIVING


At the Manchester City Sessions yesterday Henry Black, barman, pleaded guilty to breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Caroline Garrett, Upper Brook-street. Chorton-on-Metlock, and stealing therefrom a cross, a crucifix, nine rings, two brooches, a locket, a necklace, a silver cigarette case, and two gold chains, the total valued at £99. Seigmund Kindler, 33, a jeweller, of Oxford-street, City, pleaded not guilty to the charge of having received a portion of the same; the value of which was £12 10s., knowing it to have been stolen. According to Mr. Wilkinson, for the prosecution, it appeared that Mrs. Garrett, at present an artist at the Theatre Royal, Manchester, left her house on the 22nd ult., and returning at 11.30 p.m., she found that the house had been broken into, and the articles enumerated stolen. Information was given to the police, and from inquiries Black was apprehended by Detective Allan. He then admitted the offence, and said that he sold a ring to Kindler. The latter, however. denied this, but said. "A man did come to me and offer to sell a ring and other articles, but I would not buy them; I thought they were stolen." Subsequently, when taken to the Town-hall, he admitted having had the ring, from which he had taken the stones, and when taken to his shop he produced the stones and a piece of gold into which he had reduced the ring.

Detective Walker said that Black had previously borne a very good character, but had lately associated with suspicious characters. Black alleged that he had fallen to the temptation while visiting the house for the purpose of returning a dog he had found. He was sent to prison for six months.

On behalf of Kindler, it was contended that the ring had been left with him to re-set. He had borne a good character, and had often assisted the police. Several witnesses spoke of his character.

Prisoner was found guilty, and sentenced to seven months' imprisonment.


Source: Evening Express - 15th March 1902


JEWELLER ARRESTED

At Belfast to-day Sergmund Kindler, jeweller, late of Oxford-road, Manchester, was charged with having unlawfully received within the past three years large quantities of jewellery, the property oi the Great Central Railway Company.

It was stated that for six months the accused had carried on business in Belfast. His premises were searched last night, and jewellery valued at over £300, believed to be the property of the company, was found. The accused was handed over to the Manchester police.


Source: Evening Express and Evening Mail - 8th May 1906


THREE YEARS OF CRIME

SERIES OF RAILWAY FRAUDS


Sentence was passed at Manchester Assizes yesterday on John Thomas Coates and Siegmund Kindler, who had been convicted the previous day of a remarkable series of railway frauds.

Coates was formerly a district inspector on the Great Central Railway, and Kindler at one time carried on business as a jeweller in Oxford-street, Manchester. Subsequently he removed to Belfast, and it was there that he was arrested.

The actual thief, it was alleged by the prosecution, was Coates, who rifled passengers' luggage while it was in transit on the railway.

The most important case was that of a valuable diamond pendant belonging to Lady Arthur, which disappeared while she was travelling from Worksop to Manchester. Though Coates admitted several of the robberies, he denied this one, but the pendant was found in Kindler's shop in Belfast, along with other stolen property, which, it was alleged, was disposed of by Coates, after he had stolen it, to Kindler.

Moreover, in Coates's possession was found a key which fitted Lady Arthur's trunk; while he was also proved to have travelled by the train from which it was stolen.

Counsel for the prosecution explained that the system of robbery of which the prisoners were found guilty had been going on for three years. The total value of property stolen during that period was over £1,000. This, he added in reply to his lordship, was an on the branches of the Great Central Railway on which Coates acted as inspector.

Each prisoner was sentenced to five years' Penal servitude.


Source: Evening Express and Evening Mail - 14th July 1906

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dognose
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Re: Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

Postby dognose » Tue Oct 23, 2018 11:44 am

...... CLAREDON (CLARENDON)

Kingstown (Dun Laoghaire)


DEATH OF AN IRISH MISER

A man named Claredon has been found lying dead in his house at Kingstown. He was a jeweller, but had little communication with the outer world, his only companions being a dog and a cat. Though occupying a large house, he confined himself to one small room, and slept on an old sofa without blankets or other covering. The place having been locked up for some days, the police broke in, and found the occupant lying- dead on the sofa, and the two animals in a starving condition. Not a particle of food was found, save a stale crust of bread and a few lumps of sugar. In a safe the police discovered property of considerable value, consisting of gold and silver watches, jewellery, gold chains, and valuable personal ornaments. There were also two deposit receipts of the Bank of Ireland for £330 each, and in the deceased's pockets was a considerable sum of money A postmortem examination showed that the deceased had starved himself. The authorities have taken possession of his property.


Source: The Cambrian - 28th March 1884

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Re: Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

Postby dognose » Tue Oct 30, 2018 11:11 am

ALFRED ANSELL

Donegal Place, Belfast


JEWELLER'S SHOP BURGLED

During last night Mr. Alfred Ansell's jewellery shop, Donegal-place, Belfast, was burgled. The burglars confined their attention to diamonds and gold articles. It is understood that the loss, which amounts to £2,000 or £3.000, is not covered by insurance.


Source: Evening Express and Evening Mail - 20th August 1908


The 1901 Irish Census records Alfred Ansell as a 31 year old, Co. Down born Jeweller. He is married to 31 year old, Co. Antrim born Jeannie. The couple reside at 22, Malone Road, Belfast, along with their children, Violet, aged 9 and Amy, aged 2. The family's religion was recorded as Episcopal Church Church of Ireland.

Alfred Ansell does not appear to be recorded in the 1911 Irish Census.

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Re: Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

Postby dognose » Mon Nov 12, 2018 5:47 am

HENRY BYRNE

Dublin


FALL OF A DUBLIN HOUSE

On Saturday morning the back portion of a four-storey tenement house, 20, Anglesey-street, Dublin, in which six families were living, suddenly collapsed, and six or eight persons were buried in the debris. Of these a jeweller named Henry Byrne was found dead when dug out of the mass. His sister, Kate Byrne, and a man named John Timmons were very seriously injured, while others sustained injuries which necessitated o taken to the nearest hospital. The work of rescue was carried out by the City Fire Brigade under very threatening circumstances, the walls, which still maintain an upright position, being liable to collapse at any moment. A good many of the houses in the neighbourhood are very old and dilapidated, and, fearing they also would collapse, of the occupants hurriedly left them. There are some hundreds of such old houses in the heart of the city occupied by six or eight families each, and efforts are being constantly made by the Corporation and other bodies to get the people removed from them to new and comfortable artisans' dwellings.


Source: The Cardigan Observer - 4th August 1894

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Re: Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

Postby dognose » Wed Nov 14, 2018 2:03 pm

CHARLES FORSTER (I)

72, Great Britain Street, Dublin


The 1901 Irish Census records Charles Forster as a 70 year-old, Dublin born Watchmaker. He is married to 60 year-old, Dublin born Anne. They reside at 72, Gt. Britain Street, Dublin, which is recorded in the census as a shop and dwelling, with their three sons, William, a 32 year-old, Dublin born Watchmaker (see separate entry), George, a 28 year-old, Dublin born Warehouseman, and Charles, a 24 year-old, Dublin born Watchmaker (see separate entry). All three sons are unmarried. The family's religion was recorded as Church of Ireland.

The 1911 Irish Census records Anne Forster as a partly blind 75 year-old widow. She was married for 45 years, had 5 children, of whom 3 were living. She resides at 72, Gt. Britain Street, Dublin, with her two sons, George and Charles.

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Re: Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

Postby dognose » Wed Nov 14, 2018 2:23 pm

CHARLES FORSTER (II)

72, Great Britain Street, Dublin


The 1901 Irish Census records Charles Forster as a 24 year-old, Dublin born Watchmaker. He is unmarried and resides with his parents and two brothers at 72, Great Britain Street, Dublin, which is recorded in the census as a shop and dwelling. He is the son of the Watchmaker, Charles Forster (see separate entry), and the younger brother of the Watchmaker, William Forster (see separate entry). Also residing at 72, Great Britain Street is his 28 year old brother, George. The family's religion was recorded as Church of Ireland.

The 1911 Irish Census records Charles, 34 years-old, and George, 38 years old, still at 72, Great Britain Street, Dublin and the pair, still unmarried, appear to be running the family business with George as Shopman and Charles as Watchmaker. They reside with their widowed mother, 75 year-old, Anne.

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Re: Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

Postby dognose » Thu Nov 15, 2018 4:46 am

WILLIAM FORSTER

72, Great Britain Street, Dublin


THE EXPLOSION IN THE BANK OF IRELAND

The explosion which occurred in the premises of the Bank of Ireland in Dublin on the 9th inst. has had a fatal sequel, William Forster, a jeweller, having died from the injuries he received on the occasion. He, in company with the bank porter and two other persons, was looking at a number of old flintlock guns, cannon, and cartridges, which had been kept in a room of the bank since the time when it was the Irish House of Parliament, over a hundred years ago. Forster, out of curiosity, pulled the trigger of one of the flintlocks. A spark flew out and fell into an open box of cartridges, which exploded. All the persons present were injured. The inquest was opened on Saturday, and was adjourned for the attendance of a representative of the Home Office, in accordance with tb provisions of the Explosives Act.


Source: County Observer and Monmouthshire Advertiser - 29th October 1904

The 1901 Irish Census records William Forster as a 32 year-old, Dublin born Watchmaker. He is unmarried and resides with his parents and two brothers at 72, Gt. Britain Street, Dublin, which is recorded in the census as a shop and dwelling. His father is Charles Forster, a 70 year-old, Dublin born Watchmaker (see separate entry). William's younger brother, Charles (see separate entry), aged 24 years is also recorded in the census as a Watchmaker. The family's religion was recorded as Church of Ireland.

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