Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Sun Jun 09, 2013 1:51 pm

HIGGINS

8, Great Brunswick Street, Dublin

ABOUT Watches; Cleaned, 1s; Mainspring, 1s; other repairs proportionately low; Jewellery of every description repaired and restored. Higgins, 8, Great Brunswick street, Dublin.

BROKEN Watches, Rings, False Teeth, War Medals, bought; immediate cash for country parcels. Higgins, Watchmaker and Jeweller, 8, Great Brunswick street. Dublin


Source: Evening Telegraph - 16th June 1904

No trace has been found of the above in either the 1901, nor 1911 Irish Censuses.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Tue Jun 11, 2013 5:30 am

WINDER & LAMB

3, Temple Lane South, Dublin

The partnership of Frederick J. Winder and Charles Lamb was dissolved on the 28th July 1893.

WINDER AND LAMB, Silversmiths, Silver Chasers, Electro-platers and Gilders, 3, TEMPLE-LANE, DUBLIN. July 28th. Debts by Frederick J. Winder.

Source: The Watchmaker Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st September 1893

The business premises located at 3, Temple Lane South were continued to be occupied by Charles Lamb.

See: http://www.925-1000.com/dlDublin6.html#M

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Wed Jun 12, 2013 6:28 am

J. DINGWELL

Main Street, Wexford

DINGWELL, J., Jeweller, Main-street, Wexford has petitioned for an arrangement with his creditors. The unsecured liabilities are £145, and the assets £111. At the meeting of creditors the debtor offered a composition of 10s. in the £, payable by three instalments at four, eight, and twelve months, the last instalment to be secured, but no conclusion was arrived at. The following are' amongst the principal creditors interested :

Abraham and Co. - Birmingham - £5
Benova, J. - Birmingham - £ 5
Curtis Bros. - Dublin - £5
Kapp and Patterson - Dublin - £5
Panton, J. and Co. - Dublin - £67
Potter and Co. - London - £28
Williams, J., and Co. - Prescot - £28
Pinder, J. and Co. - Sheffield - £11


Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st January 1894

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Thu Jun 13, 2013 9:56 am

ANDREW CONNIHAN

Mallow

A Ticket-o'-Leave Burglar

At the last Cork Assizes, John Daly,who burglarised Andrew Coninham's (sic) jewelry store at Mallow and successfully "stowed a swag" of some £200 worth of jewelry, was sentenced to seven years' penal servitude. Most of the property has been since recovered.


Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st February 1894

The 1901 Irish Census reveals Andrew Connihan as a 24 year old, Co. Cork born, Watchmaker. He lives with his 65 year old father, John F. Connihan, who is also a Co. Cork born, Watchmaker, and his 63 year old mother, Hannah. They reside at 33, Main Street, Mallow. The family's religion was recorded as Roman Catholic.

The family do not appear to be recorded on the 1911 Irish Census.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Sat Jun 15, 2013 6:55 am

JOHN GEORGE KNIGHT

13-14, Harcourt Road, Dublin, later, Limerick

KNIGHT, John George, Watchmaker , 13 and 14, HARCOURT ROAD, DUBLIN, has filed a petition for arrangement. The unsecured liabilities are set down at ,£189, and assets at £95. Amongst the creditors are Grimshaw and Baxter, London, £22 ; Goodbody and Co., Dublin, £20 ; Fulda and David, London, £28 ; Elkham and Co., London, £22 ; J. A. Maud, Birmingham, £11 ; Paton and Co., Dublin, £68.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st November 1893

By 1901, John George Knight had relocated to Limerick, as revealed in the Irish Census of that year. He was recorded as a 45 year old, English born, Chronometer and Watchmaker Finisher. He is married to 40 year old, Limerick born Anna, and they have one son, 15 year old Harold, and four daughters, Genevieve 16, Isabel 13, Dorothy 11, and Georgina 8 years of age. They reside at 13, Mountpleasant Avenue, Limerick. John George's religion was recorded as Church of England, the rest of the family as Roman Catholics.

The 1911 Irish Census describes John George Knight as a Master Chronometer and Watchmaker, and his religion as Church of Ireland. Anna is now recorded as Anastatia. The family now reside at 13, Bedford Row, Limerick.

John George Knight's son, Harold, is recorded in the 1911 Irish Census as working as a Watchmaker in Tipperary.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Mon Jun 17, 2013 3:36 am

DANIEL MOULANG

31, Wellington Quay, Dublin

A Christmas Day Burglary. James Mool, a Dublin van-driver, is a man with no respect for Christmas Day, and accordingly upon that great festival, instead of feasting upon goose, was goose enough to turn burglar, and break into the premises of D. Moulang, 31, Wellington Quay, and steal jewelry to the value of £25 ; and although he got clean away with the property save a cut or two on the hand from the glass of the fanlight by which he entered, some of the property was traced to him. He was committed for trial.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st February 1894

Daniel Moulang is recorded in the 1901 Irish Census as a 56 year old, Dublin Co. born Jeweller. He is married to 54 year old, London born Mary Ann. They reside at 8, Water Lane, Dublin, with their children, Walter, a Watchmaker aged 25, Minnie 20, George Arthur 17, John Louis Valentine 14, and Samuel Herbert 12 years of age. They have one live-in servant. The family's religion was recorded as Church of Ireland.

The 1911 census records Daniel Moulang as a Goldsmith, Walter as Watch and Clockmaker, John Louis as a Surgeon Dentist Student, and Herbert as an Apprentice Watch Maker. The family now reside at 3, Herberton Lane, Dublin.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Tue Jun 18, 2013 4:38 am

ROBERT ALEXANDER BROWNE

Church Lane, and 20, Fairview Street, Belfast

BROWNE, Robert Alexander, Jeweler, Church-lane, and 20, Fairview-street, Belfast, has effected a deed of assignment for the benefit of his creditors to pay all debts in full, Thos. C. Browne, bookkeeper, Belfast, being appointed trustee. The unsecured liabilities are, £560, estimated at, £300. Amongst the creditors are the following:

Darton, F., and Co. - London - £14-8s-4d
Potter, W., and Sons - London - £8-5s-6d
Browne, Thomas C. - Belfast - £314-4s-10d
Tiptaft, J. W - Birmingham - £5-3s-4d
Cox Bros. - Birmingham - £23-18s-3d
Cross, George, and Co. - Birmingham - £126-6s-1d
Harris Bros. - Derby - £11-16s-9d
Jerome and Co., Limited - £24-11s-6d
Bleakley, John. - Omagh - £29-0s-0d


Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st January 1894

Robert Alexander Browne appears in the 1901 Irish Census as a 45 year old, Co. Antrim born Watchmaker and Jeweller. He is married to 41 year old, Co. Derry born Mary Elizabeth. They live with their five sons, John Wesley 22, described as a Watchmaker and Jeweller, Robert Alexander 20, described as a Watchmaker and Jeweller, Thomas Clarke 19, Chas Wadsworth 17, Benjamin Story 10, and two daughters, Kate McKee 14, and Mary Elizabeth 12 years of age. Also present is Robert's uncle, 87 year old John Blackly. The family have one live-in servant and reside at 26, Newington Avenue, Belfast. Their religion was recorded as Methodist.

The 1911 Irish Census reveals the family have removed to 6.1, The Glen, Belfast.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Wed Jun 19, 2013 7:13 am

ROBERT SMITH

57, Church Place, Lurgan

SMITH, Robert, Watchmaker and Jeweler, Church Place, Lurgan, has petitioned for an arrangement with his creditors, the unsecured liabilities being, £1,854, and assets estimated at £469. Amongst the creditors are the following :–

Grimshaw and Baxter - London - £118-19s-0d
Thompson, J., and Son - London - £39-15s-0d
Steel and Sons - Belfast - £29-2s-8d
Holmes, W. J. - Birmingham - £230-17s-4d
Mott, Thomas - Birmingham - £247-0s-0d
Cohen, J., and Co. - Birmingham - £148-12s-6d
Harris, H., and Co. - Birmingham - £106-14s-4d
Norman, S. E. - Cheetham - £66-14s-5d
French, Robert - Glasgow - £60-0s-0d
Pearson, Thomas - Glasgow - £39-12s-0d
Dickson, James - Lurgan - £187-4s-6d
Hayes, Hugh - Lurgan - £40-0s-0d
Emerson, William - Lurgan - £30-0s-0d
Nodder, John, and Sons - Sheffield - £130-0s-0d
Tower Cycle Co. - Wolverhampton - £32-10s-0d
Bankers' Claims - £62-0s-0d


Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st November 1893


SMITH, Robert, Watchmaker and Jeweler, 57, Church Place, Lurgan. Trustee : James Dobbs, Bray, commercial traveller. Assigment for benefit of creditors. Dated March 8th ; filed March 12th. Unsecured liabilities, £1,859 2s 6d.; estimated net assets, £350. List of creditors :–

Grimshaw and Baxter - London - £118-18s-9d
Thompson, J., and Son - London - £40-16s-3d
Steel and Sons - Belfast - £28-6s-3d
Robert Smith - Belfast - £20-0s-0d
Holmes, William James - Birmingham - £330-17s-6d
Mott, Thomas L. - Birmingham - £247-13s-9d
Cohen, J., and Co. - Birmingham - £148-13s-9d
Harris, H., and Co. - Birmingham - £108-17s-6d
Bayliss H. - Birmingham - £20-3s-9d
French, Robert - Glasgow - £58-8s-9d
Pearson, Thomas - Glasgow - £39-11s-3d
Dickson, James - Lurgan - £213-18s-9d
Hayes, Hugh - Lurgan - £40-2s-6d
Emerson, William - Lurgan - £31-7s-6d
Norman S.E. - Manchester - £71-12s-6d
Bryson, James - Portadown - £20-0s-0d
Nodder, John, and Sons - Sheffield - £130-0s-0d
Tower Cycle Co. - Wolverhampton - £38-7s-6d
Bankers' Claims - £50-16s-0d[/i]

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st May 1894

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Thu Jun 20, 2013 9:48 am

COYLE & Co.

16, Bishop Street, Londonderry

DISSOLUTIONS OF PARTNERSHIP
COYLE AND Co., Hardware Merchants and Jewelers, Bishop-street, Londonderry. Debts by John Coyle, who continues on his own account.


Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st December 1893

COYLE & CO., Jewellers and Machine Agents, 16, Bishop Street, Londonderry. The above have assigned their business to Mr. Edward Kevans, of Dublin. The liabilities are £4,100, and assets £3,500.

Source: The Journal of Domestic Appliances - 2nd July 1894

The 1901 Irish Census contains a possibility for John Coyle. A John P. Coyle is recorded as a 38 year old, Derry born Ironmonger's Manager. He is married to 38 year old, Derry born Annie. They have two children, one year old Mary, and one month old Eileen. They reside at 13, Victoria Place, Loddonderry. The family are recorded as Roman Catholics.

The 1911 Irish Census reveals John's full name as John Patrick Coyle. He is still an Ironmonger's Manager, and now has a son, Cyril Geoffery, aged 6 years. The family now reside at 2, West End Park, Londonderry.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Fri Jun 21, 2013 7:38 am

WILLIAM M. DOUGLAS

5, Tullow Street, Carlow


Image
W.M.Douglas - Carlow - 1899

This business is thought to have been established around 1880 by William Douglas, although there was an earlier Jeweller's shop in Tullow Street in c.1850 that traded under the name of Douglas, which is perhaps to be identified with William's family. It was later thought to have passed to George Douglas, who was likely his nephew. George is thought to have run the firm until his death in 1951 and in that same year the business was acquired by Ken Tucker. Douglas Jewellers are still in business today and are now in the hands of Ivan Tucker.

Image

The 1901 Irish Census reveals William Douglas as a 51 year old, Longford born Watchmaker. He is unmarried, a lives with his Spinster sister, 39 year old, Longford born Sarah. William's nephew and niece, George 5, and Mollie 4 years of age, are also in residence, they were both born at Carlow. Their religion was recorded as Irish Church, and they reside at 111, Tullow Street, Carlow.

The 1911 Irish Census reveals a removal to 3, Yellow Street, Carlow, and an additional resident in one James H. Webster, a 24 year old, Wexford born Watchmaker, who is very likely to be an employee of William's.

William's nephew and niece, George and Mollie, are likely to be the children of another Carlow watchmaker, George Douglas, who may be William's younger brother. The 1901 Irish Census records George as a 39 year old, Co. Longford born Watchmaker. He is a widdower, and resides at 46, Dublin Street, Carlow. The extra detail in the 1911 Irish Census records that George has two children, both of whom are alive.

It is also possible that the George Douglas that took over William's business, was his brother, rather than his nephew, but until an age at death comes to light for George Douglas this will be a grey area.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Sat Jun 22, 2013 7:11 am

JOHN PYPER

76, High Street, Belfast

PYPER, John, Jeweler, 76, High-street, Belfast. Trustee : George William Dunbar, Belfast, accountant. Assignment for benefit of creditors. Dated March March 27th. Filed March 29th. Unsecured liabilities, £1,040 11s. 3d, estimated assets, £450.

List of creditors :–

Jeannot, Paul - London - £56-8s-6d
Hearts and Co. - London - £26-10s-0d
Cohen and Son - Birmingham - £131-0s-0d
Cohen Bros. - Birmingham - £45-2s-0d
Sydenham, A. - Birmingham - £99-16s-3d
Crosbie, A. W.,and Co. - Birmingham - £85s-11s-0d
Fitter, H., and Sons - Birmingham - £65-3s-3d
Leather, W. H. - Birmingham - £26-10s-0d
Brown - Coventry - £48-5s-4d
Wolffe, Sam. - Glasgow - £34-10s-0d
Hillier and Co. - Glasgow - £24-3s-0d
Lancashire Watch Co. - Prescot - £59-11s-0d
Gallimore, John - Sheffield - £50-0s-0d
Johnson, Christopher, and Co. - Sheffield - £40-0s-0d
Nodder, John, and Son - Sheffield - £25-0s-0d
Wilkinson, H., and Son - Sheffield - £23-4s-6d


Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st May 1894

The 1901 Irish Census reveals John Pyper as a 58 year old, Co. Down born Watchmaker. He is married to 54 year old, Edinburgh born Dorothy, and they live with their sons, Thos Johnson 28, described as a Watchmaker, Fred J 19, Arch Porter 15, and daughter, Dorothy 10 years of age. Also resident is John's brother-in-law, William Johnson. They reside at 38, Knock Road, and their religion recorded as Presbyterian.

The 1911 Irish Census records that the family have removed to 244, Newtownards Road. John and Dorothy Pyper had been married for 42 years, had 12 children, of whom 8 are living.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Sun Jun 23, 2013 4:53 am

WILLIAM JOSEPH SIMPSON

10, Cornmarket, Belfast


Dear Sir, –It is with no small sense of satisfaction that I noticed in the Times of May 9th that at last, through the kindness of Baron F. de Rothschild M.P., the question of illegal dealing in gold and silver watches, jewelry and plate, had been pressed upon the attention of the Government, and I was pleased likewise to observe, that Sir William Harcourt, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, had promised that an inquiry should be made into the matter. This evil is not confined to England exclusively, but, I regret to say, also extends to Ireland, and that to an alarming extent. Take Belfast alone, and in this city there are numbers of persons employed in various ways, foremen in factories, mills and ship-building yards, commercial travellers, retired policemen and others engaged in offices under Government who act as " agents " for the sale of watches and jewelry, others manage " watch clubs," and I know of instances where a regular private trade is carried on by individuals carrying quite a stock of jewelry and watches, and who dispose of them on their own account without paying any license. Now, the professional jeweler is looked after pretty sharply by the Revenue Authorities. Then why should these free hands be permitted to escape scot free ? If any person trades in tobacco, cigars, wine, beer, spirits, keeps a dog, or uses armorial bearings without paying a license, immediate steps are taken to vindicate the law, and it is well-known that the authorities take a great deal of trouble, and incur no small expense to find out and prosecute to conviction such offenders. Then why should not these irresponsible and illegitimate dealers in gold and silver wares be compelled to pay that license which they so systematically and successfully evade ? Then, again, we have drapers, tobacconists, cutlers, stationers, and others, who in the ordinary course of every-day business, and without any attempt at concealment, deal in the prohibited wares ; yet they pay no license, and they come into daily competition with the legitimate jeweler, who is compelled to pay it. I do not hesitate to say that there is not a jeweler in England who is not quite as fully aware of the existence of these evils as I am. The time has now come when some decided move should be made to secure a remedy. The attention of the Government has been directed to the question, and if the matter falls through, and ends in smoke, the legitimate licensed traders have no one to blame but themselves. It is the duty of the Trade to urge upon the authorities the necessity which exists for a thorough revision of the law relating to the granting of these licenses. I would suggest that the jewelers throughout the country should individually collect all the available evidence possible bearing upon this question, noting names and occupation of persons, (a) Acting as " agents,'' (b) promoting " clubs," (c) trading on their own account. Such evidence will be most useful hereafter. I would also urge upon them the necessity of ventilating their grievances through the medium of the public Press, and that they should approach the members of Parliament for their various districts and educate them upon this (to us) most important question. Last month, in a letter which appeared in The Waterbury trade journal, I advocated the formation of a National Licensed Goldsmiths' and Jewelers' Union, having for its object the protection of the Trade interests throughout the kingdom. In response to my letter I had communications from all parts of the country approving of my suggestion, and promising support. Such a union must have its centre in London. Again I venture to bring forward this proposal : A subscription of £1 1s. per annum would provide a more than ample income. It will not do to sit still and wait for others to help us. We must help ourselves, and now is the time for action. I earnestly commend this important question to the attention of the Trade generally. Heretofore the struggle has been maintained by one here and another there. Public-spirited men have attempted to bring the matter to a successful issue. If the legitimate Traders are now prepared to take the matter up, no better opportunity ever offered. As a body we are all cognisant of the existence of these evils. Jewelers all over the country complain bitterly of the injury done to their trade by such irresponsible vendors. The public are suffering, thinking that by purchasing a watch or an article of jewelry at the "back door" they are able to buy it cheaper, but a little later on they find out to their cost whether they do so or not. I have seen watches sold by these gentry for £2 which could be bought in any shop for 21s. I think a memorial should be presented to the Government urging upon them the advisability of making the cost of the license uniform, viz., £5 15s, and that all persons dealing in articles of gold or silver, jewelry, watches, coins, medals, or plate, no matter what the weight may be, should be compelled to pay this duty. This, coupled with careful supervision by the Revenue authorities and an impartial administration of the law, would soon produce satisfactory results, and would be the means of putting an end to the illegal and illegitimate trading of which we complain and from which we undoubtedly suffer. I think Baron F. De Rothschild, M.P., deserves our heartiest thanks for his advocacy of our claims. We are deeply indebted to him for so successfully bringing the matter before the House, and for his exposure of the unfair and the (to us) unjust way in which the law relating to goldsmiths' and silversmiths' licenses has been administered. –I am, dear sir, yours faithfully
Belfast, May 24th, 1894. William J. Simpson.


Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st June 1894



Mr W J Simpson, Belfast, presented a gold trophy in the form of an Irish harp for the best performance on an Irish wire—strung harp of any size. The Feis Committee offered three prizes, one of £5, the second of £3, and the third of £1 for the same. There were no entries. Mr Simpson has given his trophy to the committee for the best competitor at the Feis. The award will be announced when the adjudicators will make their report.

Source: Freeman’s Journal and National Press - 24th May 1897


W.J. Simpson appears in the Belfast Directory of 1901 at 10, Cornmarket, Belfast, but not at that address in the 1907 edition.


The 1901 Irish Census reveals William Joseph Simpson as 47 year old, Dublin born Goldsmith and Jeweller. He is a widower and lives with his two sons, Evelyn John 13, and Joseph Stewert 10 years of age. They reside at 14, Fitzwilliam Avenue, Belfast, have one live-in servant. The family's religion was recorded as Church of Ireland.

The family do not appear to have been recorded in the 1911 Irish Census.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Mon Jun 24, 2013 5:55 am

JOHN WHITE

68, Upper Sackville Street, Dublin

WHITE, John, Cutler and Jeweler, 68, Upper Sackville-street, Dublin, has petitioned for arrangement with his creditors. The unsecured liabilities are set down at £1,648, and the assets estimated to be worth £1,455. Amongst the creditors are the following :

Baume and Co. - London - £14-10s-6d
Flynn, J. M. - Dublin - £210-0s-0d
Whyte, Mrs. Frances - Raheny - £1,160-0s-0d
Harrison Bros., and Howson - Sheffield - £490-0s-0d
Brookes and Crookes - Sheffield - £120-0s-0d
Gibbons and Sons - Sheffield - £20-0s-0d
Siree, Colonel - Stillorgan - £200-0s-0d


Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st March 1894


The 1901 Irish Census reveals John White as a 32 year old, Kerry born Jeweller. He is married to 25 year old, Dublin born Elsie. They have one son, George, who is 6 years old. The family reside at 646, Frankfort Avenue, Dublin, and have one live-in servant. The family's religion was recorded as Church of Ireland.

The 1911 Irish Census describes John White as a Goldsmith, he now has two sons, George Henry T. 15, and William S.J. 7 years of age. William Jameson described as a Jeweller is boarding with the family, he is 57 years old, unmarried and born in Co. Dublin and is likely to be an employee of John's. The family now reside at 7, Victoria Terrace, Dublin. Their religion is now recorded as Methodist. John and Elsie have been married for 17 years, have two children, both living.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Tue Jun 25, 2013 4:43 am

SMITH & GRANT

Lower Bridge Street, Dublin

Dissolutions of Partnerships

Smith & Grant, Lower Bridge Street, Dublin. Debts by Edward Smith


Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 5th April 1877

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Wed Jun 26, 2013 5:14 am

ALFRED SEARLE MEEKE

2, Fownes Street, Dublin

MEEKE, Alfred Searle, Watchmaker and Jeweler, 2, Fournes (sic)-street, Dublin, has executed a deed of assignment for the benefit of his creditors, with Edward Keevans, public accountant, 22, Dame-street, Dublin, as trustee. The unsecured liabilities are returned at £785, and the assets at £552. Amongst the creditors are the following :–

Dimier Bros - London - £150-18s-2d
Baume and Co. - London - £58-10s-0d
Ehrmann, B. - London - £29-18s-5d
Rasmussen, Webb, and Co. - London - £21-9s-5d
Sydenham Bros. - Birmingham - £13-9s-9d
Alabaster and Wilson - Birmingham - £84-17s-3d
Joseph, B. H., and Co. - Birmingham - £43-12s-1d
Daniel and Arter - Birmingham - £25-0s-0d
Sydenham, A. - Birmingham - £17-3s-11d
Barnett and Francis - Birmingham - £42-0s-od
Meyers, W. and J. - Birmingham - £20-7s-9d
Brenholz, D. - Birmingham - £24-0s-0d
Wolffe Bros. - Birmingham - £46-I2s 4d
Pim, J. E. - Dublin - £20-0s-0d
McCrossan and Sons - Glasgow - £24-1-2d
Wolfe Bros. - Glasgow - £15-0s-0d
Jerome and Co. - Liverpool - £18-8s-6d
Martin, Hall, and Co. - Sheffield - £13-4s-3d


Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st March 1894


The Baptism records of two children of Alfred Searle Meeke are recorded:

Name: ANNA ZELIE MEEKE
Date of Baptism: 17th November 1896 (St. Peter's, Dublin)
Date of Birth: 22nd August 1896
Address: 14, HEYTESBURY STREET
Father: ALEC ALFRED SEARLE MEEKE
Mother: ELIZABETH MEEKE
Father's Occupation: WATCHMAKER


Name: YELVYVETTE SEARLE MEEKE
Date of Baptism: 12th October 1899 (St. Peter's, Dublin)
Date of Birth: 23rd April 1899
Address: 3, PLEASANT STREET
Father: ALFRED SEARLE MEEKE
Mother: ELIZABETH MEEKE
Father's Occupation: WATCHMAKER

Alfred Searle Meeke does not appear to be recorded in the 1901 Irish Census, but his wife and children are residing her brother in Belfast.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Thu Jun 27, 2013 5:10 am

JOHN FRAZER

73, Donegal Street, Belfast

ADJUDICATION OF BANKRUPTCY

Frazer, John, 73, Donegal Street, Belfast, Jeweller.


Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 5th March 1877

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Fri Jun 28, 2013 7:36 am

CHANCELLOR & SON

55, Lower Sackville Street, 7, Grafton Street, and Lower O'Connell Street, Dublin


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While in Dublin the other day, I halted in the front of Messrs. Chancellor & Sons' splendid premises in Sackville Street, and was pleased to note a most magnificent selection of high class goods. A fine large gold demi-hunter chronometer took my fancy very much, and looked to be a magnificent piece of mechanism. Jewellery of the most recherche description is also shown in both the precious metals, and, of course, set with every variety of precious stones. Messrs. Chancellor & Sons have a great Irish reputation as photographers, too, and I saw in their windows some beautiful specimens of that branch of art, including many of our greatest and best known celebrities.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 5th May 1885


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Chancellor & Son - Dublin - 1871


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Chancellor & Son - Dublin - 1894

Chancellor and Sons
Lower O'Connell Street
Even the casual passer by may see in the windows of this well-known establishment many things suitable for Christmas presents. Watches there are in great variety, both as to form and price. Silver plate in the shape of tea-sets, claret jugs, fish knives, etc. occur to anyone at suitable presentations to either the lady or gentleman of the house. Cigarettes cases might be included in that category, for even ladies smoke now, such progress have we made in civilisation of late years. But the majority of them don't, and therefore we are in their case remitted to the silver furniture of the dining table and the sideboard. To those who are scientifically minded - not a small portion of the community nowadays - there is hardly a more fascinating possession than a good microscope such as the house in question can supply; whilst opera glasses and telescopes are desirable acquisitions in the winter as well as the summer. The model steam engine is more than a toy; it is the most gigantic physical power of modern times in miniature, and even grey-haired folk can take pleasure at seeing it at work. That marvel of up-to-date scientific mechanism, the phonograph, is to be had here; and the self-acting piano orchestrion, with its multifarious programme, can give to those who cannot play the old-fashioned instrument any amount of excellent music that they may require, and can be stopped at a moment's notice when the feeling creeps amongst the listeners that they have had enough. That delightful old invention, the magic lantern, should by no means be omitted from the sparing selections here made from a stock of the finest and most ample character.


Source: The Freeman's Journal - 12th December 1899

John Chancellor appears to have passed away by the time of the 1901 Irish Census. His widow, 56 year old, Scottish born Lily, is head of the family. She lives with her son, J.W. Chancellor who is aged 29 years, Dublin born, and described as 'Photographers & C.'. There are two daughters in residence, L.E.H. Chancellor 26, and F.A.C. Chancellor 24 years of age, and Lily's grandson, Harry North 7, and granddaughter, Mary North 9 years of age. The family reside at 64, Leeson Street Lower, Dublin, and have two live-in servants. The family's religion was recorded as Church of Ireland.

The 1911 Irish Census reveals John William Chancellor, as a Jeweller and Photographer. He is now married to 30 year old, English born Cicely. They have two daughters, Joyce Fanny 5, and Lilias Betty 1 year of age. The family reside at 8, Fitzwilliam Terrace, Dublin, and have one live-in servant.

The 1911 Irish Census records Lily Chancellor as now retired, and described as an Annuitant. She now resides at 72, Merrion Road, Dublin, with daughter, Florence A. Chancellor, and grandsons, Harry L. North 16, and Norman F. North aged 12 years.

The business registered with the Dublin Assay Office and entered their mark 'C & S' contained within an oblong punch with clipped corners, in 1895.

Trev.

dognose
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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Sat Jun 29, 2013 1:19 pm

CHRISTIAN AUGUST HERMES

4, Garfield Street, Belfast


BREAKING AND ENTERING

James Voer was put forward on the charge of having broken into and entered the premises of Christian A. Hermes, jeweller, High Street, and stolen therefrom two watchmaker's lathes, a quantity of jewels, and other articles. There was a second count charging him with receiving.

Mr. M'Erlean, who defended, pleaded guilty on behalf of the prisoner on the second count, which was accepted, and gave evidence of character on his behalf.


Source: The Belfast News-Letter - 20th April 1888


DEEDS OF ARRANGEMENT
Hermes, Christian August, 4, Garfield-street, Belfast, watch and clock maker. Confirmation order. A composition of 5s. in the £ on all secured and partly secured debts, by three instalments of Is. 8d. each, at three, six, and nine months from date of confirmation, the first and second instalments to be secured by promissory notes of petitioner, and the last by joint and several promissory notes of petitioner and John Holmes, of Raphael-street, mineral water manufacturer, and Robt. A. Browne*, of Church-lane, both in Belfast, watch and clock maker. Date of order: November 24. Unsecured liabilities, £543 17s. 8d. ; net assets, £170

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and silversmith - 1st January 1891

*See above post for details of Robert Alexander Browne


The 1901 Irish Census reveals Christian August Hermes as a 49 year old, German born Watchmaker. He is married to 47 year old, German born Bertha. They have three children, daughter Alma 15, and sons, Herman 14, who is an apprentice Watchmaker, and August 11 years of age. All the children were born at Belfast. The family reside at 140, Dunluce Avenue, Belfast. Their religion was recorded as Presbyterian.

The family do not appear to be recorded in the 1911 Irish Census.

Trev.

dognose
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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Wed Jul 03, 2013 12:58 pm

WILLIAM HILLIARD

Main Street, Tipperary, and later, Tralee

An Irish Tradesman's Protest
Thomas Frederick Williams, trading as Williams and Co., watch-material manufacturers at Prescot, has appeared on adjournment on his public examination in the Liverpool Bankruptcy Court. The Registrar said he had received a letter from a gentleman in Tipperary, complaining about some statement made by the bankrupt at the last examination. It was written by W. Hilliard, watchmaker and jeweller, Tipperary, and complained of the following statement made by Mr. Williams : –" Since then, however, he had several heavy losses, including one of over £100 through the evictions in Tipperary. Nearly all the men in the trade in Main-street, there and their business, and in some cases their stocks also, had been destroyed."–The Bankrupt said that he intended to imply that he had lost the money in Tipperary and neighbourhood: He was sorry he had made such a blunder.–The Official Receiver added that Mr. Hilliard stated that he was the only person since 1883 who had been engaged in Main-street, Tipperary, and who in that trade had been evicted. He had only three small transactions, amounting to £2 10s. 6d., with the Messrs. Williams, and the money had never been demanded from him. Although he had been evicted six months, Mr. Williams willingly gave him credit. His trade had not been destroyed by the evictions, and his business was carried on in his new home in the same way as it was in Main-street.–Questioned by Mr. Gittens, the bankrupt said he had lost £12 to £15 in Tipperary town.–The Official Receiver : Then what was the use of talking about having lost £100 in Tipperary ? The Registrar said it appeared from the letter that there was danger of an injury being done to a tradesman in Tipperary, and that was why he thought the matter should be mentioned. –The examination was further adjourned.


Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st December 1890

The above almost certainly refers to William Hilliard, who in the 1901 Irish Census is recorded as a 39 year, Tralee born Optician. He is married to 38 year old, Tralee born Annie. They have two children, William D. who is 15 years old and born at Chestsey, England, and Ethel M. who is 11 years old and born in Tipperary. The family reside at 2, Cloonalour, Tralee, Co. Kerry. They have one live-in servant. The family's religion was recorded as Church of Ireland.

In the 1911 Irish Census, William is recorded as a Retail Jeweller and Optician. He is a widower and lives with his 21 year old daughter, Ethel Margurite, who was born at Tipperary. They reside at 2, Denny Street, Tralee, have one live-in servant. William was recorded as having two children, both of whom are alive.

William Hilliard's marriage to Annie Georgina Dobson occurred at Tralee on the 15th November 1884. William was recorded as a Jeweller, and the son of William Hilliard, also a Jeweller. Annie's father was R.W. Dobson, a Merchant. Neither William or Annie had been married before.

As a side note, William's sister, Cathrine, was married in the same church less than two months earlier, on the 24th September 1884. She married the Rev. William Hanbury Smartt, of 20, Barker Street, Oldham, Lancashire.

From the above information we can glean that William Hilliard was likely working in England in c.1886 before setting up business at Main Street, Tipperary. He was later to return to his home town of Tralee some time between 1890 and 1901 to work in the trade there.

William was the son of William Hilliard, and the elder brother of Robert Hilliard, who were both Jewellers and Watchmakers in Tralee.

Trev.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Thu Jul 04, 2013 6:10 pm

WILLIAM HILLIARD (Senior)

Tralee

William Hilliard was the father of William Hilliard (see above post) and the father of the Jeweller and Watchmaker Robert Hilliard.

The 1901 Irish Census reveals William Hilliard as a 72 year old, Kerry born Jeweller and Watchmaker. He is a widower, and lives with his son Robert. They reside at I, Denny Street, Tralee. They have one live-in servant and their religion was recorded as Church of Ireland.

William Hilliard (Senior) does not appear in the 1911 Irish Census.

William Hilliard married Anne Williams of Callinafercy on thr 3rd January 1861 at Kilcolman, Co. Kerry.

Trev.


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