Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Thu Mar 07, 2013 11:17 am

THOMAS M.TOBIN

65, Castle Street, Nenagh, Co. Tipperary

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Thomas M. Tobin - Nenagh - 1889

The 1901 Irish Census reveals Thomas Tobin as a 47 year old, Co. Tipperary born Jeweller and Watchmaker, living at 23, Castle Street, Nenagh, with his 32 year old wife, Delia and their seven children. The family were recorded as Roman Catholics. They have one live in servant.

The 1911 Irish Census reveals the the family had moved to 55, Castle Street.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Sun Mar 10, 2013 10:51 am

CORNELIUS BULL

16, Upper Gloucester Street, later, 21, Suffolk Street, and 47, Clarendon Street, Dublin

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C. Bull - Dublin - 1890

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C. Bull - Dublin - 1904

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C. Bull - Dublin - 1904

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C. Bull - Dublin - 1905

The application of direct trading to a very important and representative branch of Irish industry finds notable illustration in the operations of Mr. Cornelius Bull, whose business, conducted during the past twenty-five years in Dublin, has tended to simplify the acquisition of all those church furnishings hitherto obtainable only from and through the continental sources of production. The work and trade upon which Mr. Bull has been so long and successfully engaged has developed considerably, and in a manner which indicates how thoroughly the Catholic clergy and the various religious communities, for providing whose requirements the business was established, have appreciated the advantages it confers. The transference of the business from its original location in Upper Gloucester Street to the splendid new premises in Suffolk Street was due to the great increases of the trade, and–apart from the commodiousness and convenience gained by the removal –the premises have afforded many opportunities for display tending to render the house one of the most attractive features of the leading thoroughfare in which it is situated. From an imposing plate-glass frontage the interior extends backwards over a distance of nearly 100 yards, forming a magnificent showroom arranged under all the effective conditions which enhance and emphasize the beauty of a stock embracing so many and varied departments. The exhibit of church ornaments and altar furniture, regarded collectively, presents a superb illustration of decorative taste, and indicates a completeness and exhaustiveness which it is, obviously, impossible to describe. There are altars in carved and polished oak, pitch pine, and other woods designed and manufactured by the proprietor and enriched by polychrome decoration. Also pulpits, communion rails, tabernacles, stalls, and confessionals; and there are represented also those portable altars usefully adapted and furnished for foreign missions or sea voyages. In adapting these and other accessories of the altar to the needs of small missions everywhere, Mr. Bull has manifestly endeavoured to maintain a comparatively inexpensive scale of charges, and an instance of this is to be found in his Stations of the Cross, which can be provided at a very moderate figure. At the same time rich oil paintings by first-class artists are here shown, many of these being fine examples of bas-relief, and the framing is designed and executed on the premises according to order, with a view of rendering the pictures expressly suitable either for the most unpretentious country chapel or for an important metropolitan cathedral. The framing of altar charts and the production of expositions, priedieu, vestment presses, and sarcophagi are among the practical operations of this house, and the firm's taste and handiwork in this direction are manifested by an elegant range of specialities, in which all the features of chaste design and finish are characterised. This is believed to be the cheapest house in Europe for vestments, as well as for all the materials used in their manufacture, and many of these are richly embroidered in gold; also albs of Brussels and Limerick lace. The proprietor is in communication with several of the best Lyons houses for the supply of silks, cloth of gold, &c., and a very large proportion of the statues and cribs here shown are the productions of the most celebrated French makers. The visitor to this establishment cannot fail to note the extensive collection of banners, bannerettes, processional canopies, ombrellinos, and antependia–all of which Mr. Bull has supplied to most of the Sodalities and Confraternities in Ireland. These are supplemented by an immense and diversified stock of crucifixes, fine plastique statues under shades, and silver bijouterie of every description comprehended within the category of religious fancy goods; and a rich profusion of altar bouquets add to the beauty and interest of this large display. Besides a considerable number of assistants in the warehouse and office Mr. Bull employs a staff of about thirty hands in the factory at 47, Clarendon Street, opposite St. Teresa's R. C. Church, and here there is constantly presented a busy scene of art work and industry. Wood carving, metal working, &c., &c., are all here exemplified, and the stranger to the Metropolis must view with especial favour the presence in Dublin of an industry that has become a useful centre of resource for the needs of Catholic clergymen in this essentially Catholic country. There is embodied in the equipment of the factory a fine range of new and ingenious machinery operating under steam power and the whole work is carried out on a basis of efficiency and completeness equal in every respect to the continental factories. Mr. Bull spares no expense to secure the reproduction of the ecclesiastical and artistic woodwork with which Belgium, France, Germany, and Italy have been hitherto so long credited; and to this end makes an annual visit to these countries and to their principal churches and workshops. The results of so close a connection with the best centres of production are to be noted in the excellency of everything emanating from the Clarendon Street factory, and it must be a matter of great satisfaction to clergymen everywhere throughout the country that here in Dublin there is controlled an establishment which provides so well and economically all the innumerable details of the Church's many artistic requirements.

Source: Dublin, Cork, and South of Ireland: A Literary, Commercial, and Social Review - 1892


Cornelius Bull, the son of Daniel Bull (b.1806, d.1852), a Farmer, and Mary Ann Watson (b.1808, d.1890), was born in Cranfield, Bedfordshire, in 1835 (Baptised 3rd July 1835). He was apprenticed to Francis Wood, a Draper liner at Cranfield in c.1850. He married French born Gabrielle Joune. He was the father of Lucien Bull (b.1876, d.1972) who was a pioneer in chronophotography, and Rene Bull (b.1872, d.1942), who was to succeed him in business (noted as managing director of C. Bull Ltd. in 1927).

Cornelius Bull was first noted in business at Dublin in 1879. In 1883 he was recorded as being located at 16, Upper Gloucester Street, Dublin, and by 1887 at 21, Suffolk Street, Dublin. He was noted as a JP in 1896. Cornelius likely retired or died around 1914, His business continued until 1956 at least.

He entered a mark, 'C·B' contained within a heraldic shield, with the London Assay Office on the 12th January 1906. In light of this event it is likely that he also entered marks with the Dublin Assay Office.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Sat Mar 16, 2013 1:43 pm

FRANCIS BRENNAN

83, St. Patrick Street, Cork


WALTHAM WATCHES – £3 10s. 0d. - FOR Three Pounds Ten Shillings, one of the new celebrated American Waltham Company's Silver Lever Watches, with Jewelled Escapement Expansion Balance, Fogg's Patent Pinion to prevent damage to the train by the accidental breaking of the Mainspring–a more durable and reliable time-keeper than the English Lever at three times its cost. Send for descriptive pamphlet and the Official Report on American Watches, International Exhibition, Philadelphia, 1876, to
MR. F. BRENNAN,
GOLDSMITH AND JEWELLER,
83, PATRICK STREET


Source: The Cork Examiner - 21st February 1878


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F. Brennan - Cork - 1945

Francis Brennan was recorded in The Commercial Directory and Shippers Guide of 1879 as being located at 83, St. Patrick Street, Cork. He does not appear in the 1901/1911 Irish Censuses. However, a William Brennan, Jeweller, who may have been Francis's son, was recorded. In the 1901 census, William is aged 36 years, unmarried, and living with his three unmarried sisters, Lizzie, aged 48 years, Katie, aged 35 years, and Janie, aged 33 years. They live at 22, Patrick Street, with two boarders and two live-in servants. The family are recorded as Roman Catholics.

The 1911 census reads much the same, except that the family have moved to 65, Western Road and no longer have boarders and only one live-in servant.

As can be seen from the above advertisement, by 1945 the business was now in the hands of D.W. Loane and H.G. Loane, and still located in the original premises.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Fri Mar 22, 2013 7:48 am

MATTHEW J. STAUNTON

D’Olier Street and Dawson Street, Dublin

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The Sam Maguire Cup

The Sam Maguire Cup, often referred to as Sam or The Sam (Irish: Corn Sam Mhic Uidhir), is the name of the cup that is awarded to winners of the All-Ireland Senior Football Championship, the premier "knockout" competition in the game of Gaelic football played in Ireland. The series of games are organised by the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) and are played during the summer months with the All-Ireland Football Final being played on the third or fourth Sunday in September in Croke Park, Dublin. The Sam Maguire Cup was first presented to the winning team in 1928.[1]

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The Cup is named after Sam Maguire, an influential figure in the London GAA and a former footballer,[2] a group of his friends formed a committee in Dublin under the chairmanship of Dr Pat McCartan from Carrickmore, County Tyrone, to raise funds for a permanent commemoration of his name. They decided on a cup to be presented to the GAA. The Association were proud to accept the Cup. At the time it cost £300. In today's terms that sum is equivalent to €25,392. The cup is modelled on the Ardagh Chalice and the commission to make it was given to Hopkins and Hopkins, a jewellers and watchmakers of O'Connell Bridge, Dublin.
Although Hopkins and Hopkins were commissioned to make the original Sam Maguire Cup, this company did not have the facilities for such a big job. Instead, they in turn contracted the work to the silversmith Matthew J. Staunton, who had his business in D’Olier Street, Dublin. Having outsourced the manufacturing of the cup to Matthew J. Staunton, Hopkins and Hopkins had their own initials 'H&H' stamped on it. This was a common practice. Staunton's maker's mark was 'MS'.

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At the time, everyone in the Irish silver trade was aware that Staunton had made the Cup. Among these was John Doyle, a silver polisher and plater, who served his time under Staunton from 1948 to 1955 and continued to work with Staunton until 1966 when Staunton’s business closed. Doyle and a fellow worker, Eamon Aspil, then formed their own company, Doyle and Aspil Silversmiths. Doyle and Aspil continued to repair and polish the cup periodically for as long as it remained in use by the GAA.
Maitiú Standun, Staunton’s son, confirmed in a letter printed in the Alive! newspaper in October 2003 that his father had indeed made the original Sam Magiure Cup back in 1928.
Matthew J. Staunton (1888—1966) came from a long line of silversmiths going back to the Huguenots, who brought their skills to Ireland in the 1600s. Matt, as he was known to his friends, served his time under the renowned Dublin silversmith, Edmond Johnson, who made the Liam McCarthy Hurling Cup in 1921. The 1928 Sam Maguire Cup is a faithful copy of the Ardagh Chalice. The bowl was not spun on a spinning lathe but hand-beaten from a single flat piece of silver. Even though it is highly polished, multiple hammer marks are still visible today, indicating the manufacturing process.
Kildare was the first county to win the "Sam Maguire Cup" in 1928 after defeating Cavan 2-6 to 2-5. The original trophy was retired in 1988 as it had received some damage over the years. The GAA commissioned a replica from Kilkenny-based silversmith Desmond A. Byrne and the replica is the trophy that has been used ever since. The original Sam Maguire Cup is permanently on display in the GAA's museum at Croke Park. In 2010 the GAA asked the same silversmith to produce another replica of the trophy (the third Sam Maguire Cup) although this was to be used only for marketing purposes.[3] Meath's Joe Cassells was the first recipient of "Sam Óg". Meath have the distinction of being the last team to lift the old Sam Maguire and the first team to lift the new one following their back-to-back victories in 1987 & 1988.
Only eight men have had the honour of being presented with the trophy twice as captain. They are; Joe Barrett (Kerry), Jimmy Murray (Roscommon), J. J. O'Reilly (Cavan), Seán Flanagan (Mayo), Enda Colleran (Galway), Tony Hanahoe (Dublin) Declan O'Sullivan (Kerry) and Brian Dooher (Tyrone). Since the cup was first played for in the All Ireland final of 1928 Kerry have won it 29 times (7 All Ireland wins before 1928), far more than anyone else. Dublin are next with 9 (14 All Ireland wins before 1928). Galway have won it 8 times (1 All Ireland win before 1928), Meath 7 and Cork 5 (2 All Ireland wins before 1928).


1 - a b Kenny, Tom (14 April 2011). "The men who first brought Sam to Galway". Galway Advertiser. Retrieved 14 April 2011. "In 1928, the Sam Maguire Trophy was presented to the GAA, and ever since, it has been the dream of every county in Ireland to hold it aloft in Croke Park on the third Sunday in September."
2 - Prendeville, Tom (22 August 2010). "GAA heroes died poor and alone". Irish Independent. Retrieved 2012-12-02.
3 - O’Connor, Colm (August 19, 2010). "All-Ireland replica trophies nearly ready". Irish Examiner. Retrieved 2 December 2012.


The above text and images were reproduced from Wikipedia - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sam_Maguire_Cup

Matthew J. Staunton entered his mark with the Dublin Assay Office in September 1927.

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Example of a Chrismatory by Matthew Staunton:

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The Chrismatory is 2¾" (7cm) in height, and extremely heavy for it's size, weighing nearly 3 oz. It is fully hallmarked on the base, and partial marks on the rest of the pieces. It was assayed at Dublin in 1942. The assay scape was never polished out and is still visible in the third section of the third image.

Details of the use of the Chrismatory can be found at: What-is-it Question CLXXI



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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Sat Mar 23, 2013 7:04 am

DOYLE & ASPIL

South Circular Road, Dublin

The business of Doyle & Aspil was founded in c.1966 by John Doyle and Eamon Aspil. They were believed to be partnership until 1988.

John Doyle served his apprenticeship under Matthew J. Staunton from 1948 to 1955 and continued to work with Staunton until his death and the closure of his business in 1966. Eamon Aspil is also thought to have worked for Matt Staunton.

Doyle & Aspil entered their mark, 'D & A' incuse and contained within an oblong punch, with the Dublin Assay Office in May 1968.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Sun Mar 24, 2013 7:59 am

DESMOND A. BYRNE

The Castle Yard, The Parade, Kilkenny

Dessie Byrne served his apprenticeship with Gunnings at Dublin. He was the maker of the replica Sam Maguire Cup, Gaelic football’s most sought-after prize, and is based on the 8th century Ardagh Chalice, in 1988, following the retirement of Staunton's, now fragile, 1928 original trophy which is now permanently on Display at the Gaelic Athletic Association's museum at Croke Park, Dublin. The trophy weighs over 8.5 kg.

In 2010 the Gaelic Athletic Association commissioned Dessie Byrne to make yet another replica of the trophy to be used for marketing purposes.

Des Byrne was also the silversmith who manufactured the silver figure of St. Patrick, enclosing the words of St. Patrick’s Breastplate, that was commissioned by the Irish Government and presented to Pope John Paul when he visited Ireland in 1979. The 18 inch high figure contained 1700 grams of sterling silver.

Desmond A. Byrne registered his mark, 'DAB' in stylised celtic letters without outline, with the Dublin Assay Office.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Mon Mar 25, 2013 7:19 am

LAWRENCE & SON

5, & 7, Upper Sackville Street, Dublin


Lawrence & Son, Photographers, Jewellers, Toy Importers, etc., 5 and 7, Upper Sackville .Street. –The large establishments, 5 and 7, Upper Sackville Street, the destinies of which are so very successfully guided by Mr. W. Lawrence, may well boast of being the leading houses of their kind in the Irish metropolis. The establishment of those concerns dates back more than half a century, and since that date they have made rapid and unfaltering advances in the countenance and goodwill of the general public. The premises occupied are two splendid establishments in the most fashionable street in the metropolis, comprising Nos. 5 and 7, Upper Sackville Street, extending to Tyrone Place, and occupying the rear of Nos. 8, 7, 6, 5, and 4, Sackville Street. The house No. 7 is engaged in the sale of jewellery, games, and toys. To the jewellery division is devoted one window, to the games and toys another. In the window to the left of the swinging glass doors is contained a selection of jewellery, which for novelty of design, neatness of finish, and general excellence it would be difficult to match in any other house in the city. In this window, without doubt, the chief feature is the display of articles made from Irish bog-oak and Connemara marble. In the window to the right are exhibited the various toys and games, in the sale or stock of which Lawrences' stand unrivalled. In the stocks held within are the most attractive articles of jewellery, both useful and ornamental, as well as a variety of cricket goods, footballs, tennis outfits, outdoor and indoor games of all sorts, including a splendid assortment of toys bought in the Parisian and German markets, which Mr. Lawrence personally attends. The comprehensiveness and magnitude of the stocks in both departments allow room for even the most exacting to fully satisfy himself. A branch of business that is all-important in itself is the Christmas-card trade which is carried on during the festive season of Yule-tide. In connection with this department a great number of hand's are employed the whole year-round, painting the popular hand-painted cards ; and so great is the proficiency of these artists that they are not only able to earn a good return, but Mr. Lawrence is able to supply the market at the cheapest rate. At No. 5 is carried on the photographic business, and there can be no wonder at the immense numbers who patronise Mr. Lawrence's studio, when the excellent photos daily taken are once seen. The portrait studio is handsomely appointed. It has the advantage of being placed on the first floor, so that the clientèle need not, as in other studios, have to climb to the top of the house. Attached to it are spacious and comfortable dressing and reception-rooms. In connection with the view department this establishment has two hundred agents in every part of Ireland, including Killarney, Cork, Giants' Causeway, and all the places of interest, so that the valuable stock of photographs and views of the scenery and antiquities of our country is well kept up. Some idea will be had of the valuable nature of the stock held here when it is stated that the view negatives of Irish scenery alone number 10,000. The splendid specimens of cabinets and large-size photos in the windows of this establishment comprise accurate pictures of the leading politicians, actresses, clergymen, and of Irish scenery, and must be seen for the perfection reached in this art to be appreciated. The connection enjoyed by both houses is most widespread and influential. The onerous duty of managing the entire concern devolves on the proprietor, who discharges it with ability and energy, and who is socially as well as commercially respected.

Source: Industries of Dublin - 1887

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Tue Mar 26, 2013 5:21 am

WILLIAM CARTY

86, Grafton Street, later, 1, Duke Street, Dublin


William Carty, Watchmaker, 86, Grafton Street; £2 each a true Timekeeper, my Silver Geneva Watch, in all sizes, jewelled in eight holes; guaranteed for ten years.
William Carty, Jeweller, 86, Grafton Street; real gems, half a guinea each. Lady's Gem Rings, real stones, mounted in fine gold, also at £1 up to £20 each.
William Carty, Silversmith, 86, Grafton Street; Old Things Made New, spoons, forks, candlesticks, cake baskets, cruet frames, tea sets re-plated at about one-fourth the original cost.


Source: Freemans Journal - 23rd August 1884


Luk heere now ! Oim' tellin' yez ! It's meself as'll be puttin' another eye in yer 'ed if yez are afther blarneyin' wid me ! D'ye heere that? By the poiper that played befoore Moses 0'ill have the loife av yez ef yez bees homboggen heere any moore! Whisht ! Wait whoile Oi tell yez what a gim av a bhoy me ould frind Mishter Carty, of 86, Grafton Street, Doblon", is. He aditfrtisses just loike this : –A " Real Gem." – The Half Guinea Gem Ring in Fine Gold, mounted with Pearls, Rubies, Coral, or Turquoise. Also at 17s. 6d., 20s., 30s., 40s., 50s! each, and up to £30. William Carty, Jeweller and Watchmaker, 86, Grafton Street, Dublin. Isn't 'that Oirish whit, now '?

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 5th June 1885


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William Carty - Dublin - 1892


William Carty was a former employee of Whitehouse & Co.


William Carty appears in the 1901 Irish Census as a 57 year old Jeweller, born in Wexford. He is described as married, but Mrs Carty was not resident on the day of the census. He lives at 291, Gilford Road, Dublin, with his four daughters, Kathleen 27 years, Norah 18 years, Letitia 17 years, and Hilda 13 years, all were born in Co. Dublin, none of whom are married, and none of whom appear to be working. Also occupant is William's baby granddaughter, Mary Fray. They appear to be fairly prosperous, as they have three live-in servants. The family are Methodists.

The 1911 census reveals some changes in the Carty household, William, now 67 years, is described as a Traveller. He is married to Mary Jane, aged 62 years, born in Co. Dublin, whose occupation is described as 'Cafe's Restaurant', they have been married for 44 years and had 14 children, of whom 13 were living. Daughters, Kathleen and Hilda are still resident, Hilda is employed as an Organist. Also resident are a Nurse and now just one servant. The family now reside at 6, Gilford Road, Dublin.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Thu Mar 28, 2013 9:24 am

JAMES C. BYRNE MANUFACTURING LIMITED

29, South Anne Street, Dublin 2

Jim Byrne has been in business at Dublin, both as a retailer and a manufacturer since 1959.

Jim's grandfather, James Byrne was a silversmith who served his apprenticeship under John Smyth & Sons of Dublin. Below is an image of James's indenture:

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This Indenture witnesseth that James Byrne of No 35 Hardiwick Street in the County of city of Dublin of his own free will and accord, and with the consent of his Guardians doth put himself Apprentice to John Smyth & Sons Silversmiths of No 17 Wicklow St. in the County of the City of Dublin to learn their trade and with them (after the manner of an Apprentice) to dwell and serve from the 29th day of June 1891 (one) until the full end and Term of Seven (7) Years from thence next following, to be full completed and ended. During which Term the said Apprentice his said Masters faithfully shall serve their secrets keep, their lawful commands everywhere gladly do, he shall do no damage to his said Masters nor see it to be done of others, but that he to his power shall let or forthwith give warning to his said Masters of the same he shall not waste the Goods his said Masters nor lend them unlawfully to any. He shall not contract Matrimony within the said Term. Hurt to his said Masters shall not do, or cause or procure to be done by others he shall not play at Cards, Dice Tables, or any other unlawful games, whereby his said Masters may have loss, with his own or other goods during said Term. Without licence his said Masters shall neither buy or sell, he shall not haunt or use Taverns, Ale Houses, or Play Houses, nor absent himself from his said Masters service day or night, unlawfully, but in all things, as an honest and faithful Apprentice, he shall behave himself towards his said Masters, and all others during the said Term and his said Masters said Apprentice in the same Art which they useth, by the best way and means that they can, shall teach and instruct, or cause to be taught and instructed, with due correction, finding unto their said Apprentice the Sum of Two shillings & sixpence per week for the first two years. Three shillings & sixpence for the for the third year. Four shillings & sixpence for the forth year. Five shillings & sixpence for the fifth year. Six shillings & sixpence per week for the sixth year, and Ten shillings per week for the Seventh year last year.
Befitting such an Apprentice, during the said term, according to the custom of the Silversmith Trade.
And for the due performance of all and every the said Covenants and Agreements either of the said Parties bindeth themselves to the other by these Presents.

In WITNESS whereof , the Parties and named to these INDENTURES inter- changeably put their Hands and Seals, the 26th day of October in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety one ( 1891)

Signed ,Sealed and Delivered

In the presence of

John Kane James Byrne

Anthony R?????? John Smyth & Sons



The 1901 Irish Census records James W. Bryne as 23 year old unmarried Silversmith born in Dublin City. He lives with his 55 year old widowed father, James, who is described as an unemployed Pawnbroker's Manager, born in Co. Kildare. They live at 34-3 Synge Street, Dublin and are recorded as Roman Catholics.

My thanks to the Byrne family for allowing the reproduction of James Byrne's Indenture and to Aidan Breen for his assistance and for supplying the image.
http://www.aidanjbreen.com/

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Fri Mar 29, 2013 4:20 pm

LAURENCE REDMOND, later, REDMOND & Co.

96, Lower Gardiner Street, and 65 South George’s Street, Dublin

Antique and Modern Silver Plate and Jewellery, Gold and Silver Watches, Rings, Pins, Bracelets, Etc., 25 per cent less than elsewhere for cash; goods guaranteed; gold and silver bought and exchanged; designs in gold and silver tastefully executed. Laurence Redmond, Manufacturing Jeweller and Silversmith, 96, Lower Gardiner Street, Dublin; cash also advanced here.

Source: Freemans Journal - 6th December 1884


Gold, Silver, Jewels; cash advances on valuable property at the central and privately conducted Pawnbroking Establishments, Redmond and Co., 65 South George’s street and 96 Lower Gardiner street.

Source: Evening Telegraph - 16th June 1904

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Sat Mar 30, 2013 10:38 am

JAMES MALCOMSON

70, Main Street, Cavan

APPRENTICE WANTED. - Wanted, a respectable BOY as apprentice to the Watch and Clockmaking business.
Apply to: JAMES MALCOMSON, Watchmaker and Jeweller, 70, Main-street, Cavan.


Source: Cavan Weekly News - 2nd August 1878

James Malcomson was also recorded as working in Caven in January 1876.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Sun Mar 31, 2013 9:47 am

JAMES H. LEEKS

13, Suffolk Street, Dublin, and 110, Hatton Garden, London EC


VISITORS TO DUBLIN HORSE SHOW

JAMES H. LEEKS

DIAMOND MERCHANT, GOLDSMITH, AND WATCH MANUFACTURER

13, SUFFOLK STREET, DUBLIN

A LARGE Assortment always in Stock of GENT's and LADIES' GOLD and SILVER WATCHES, DIAMONDS, RUBY, EMERALD, SAPPHIRE, and OPAL RINGS, CLOCKS, BAROMETERS, FIELD and OPERA GLASSES, SILVER HALL-MARKED PLATE, and ELECTRO PLATED GOODS.
Old Gold and Silver purchased for Cash, or exchanged for New Goods. Highest Cash Prices given for ANTIQUE JEWELLERY, COINS, MINIATURES, WAR MEDALS, ARTIFICIAL TEETH, and OLD SHEFFIELD PLATED WARE.
Experienced men from Clerkenwell, London EC engaged for Repairs to Watches, Clocks, Musical Boxes, Barometers, etc.
Special personal attention given to the Repairing Department, and all orders executed with care and promptitude.
Goods sent on Sale or Return to any part of Ireland upon receipt of order with approved references.
"MY SPECIAL" GENTLEMAN'S STERLING SILVER WATCH, at 13s 6d, warranted for Five Years.

JAMES H. LEEKS,

JEWELLER, SILVERSMITH, and OPTICIAN,

13, SUFFOLK STREET, DUBLIN

AND 110, HATTON GARDEN, LONDON EC


Source: Freeman's Journal - 30th August 1900

James H. Leeks of 11, Mountjoy Square, Dublin, son of George Leeks, deceased, married Anastasia Keane, daughter of Michael Keane, deceased, of Ennis, at St. Mary's, Dublin, on the 16th January 1900.

The 1901 Irish Census reveals James Leeks as a married 37 year old, English born, Jeweller Merchant. He was living as a boarder in the house of 64 year old, retired Cooper, Joseph Ledwidge, at 69, St. Stephen's Green, Dublin. Also boarding at the house was 35 year old, Co. Galway born, Anastasia Leeks, who is James's wife. They were recorded as Roman Catholics.

James Leeks does not appear to be recorded in the 1911 Irish Census.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Tue Apr 02, 2013 10:23 am

EDWARD GORDON

16, Mary Street, Dublin

E. GORDON,
Watchmaker, Jeweller, Silversmith, and Optician.
16, Mary Street, Dublin.
The Cheapest and Best House for repairs in the City.
Watches cleaned 1s 6d, guaranteed for 12 months.
silver Watches from 18s 6d, 21s, and 25s.
Guaranteed 5 Years
Sign:- "The Blue Specs"


Source: Freeman's Journal - 24th August 1893


TROUBLESOME and Stopping Watches effectively cured and throughly repaired; Cleaning, 1s 6d. with 12 months’ guarantee; other repairs proportionately low. Gordon, Jeweller, Mary street, Dublin; remember this, please.

Source: Evening Telegraph - 16th June 1904


The 1901 Irish Census reveals Edward Gordon as a 41 year old, Belfast born, Watchmaker. He lives with his wife, 31 year old, Dublin born, Lucy, and their four children, Alice 9, Ernest 8, Valentine 6, and Kathleen 5 years. Also present in the household is Edward's sister, 34 year old Margaret. The family are recorded as Roman Catholics and reside at 44, Mary Street.

The 1911 Census now describes Edward as a Master Jeweller. They have a another three children, Margaret 9, Francis 6, and Hilda 3 years. The family now have a live-in servant. Edward's son, Ernest, is now described as an Assistant Jeweller. The Census reveals that Edward and Lucy have been married for 20 years, they had 8 children, of whom 7 are living. They now reside at 43, Mary Street.

Trev.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Mon Apr 08, 2013 5:46 am

TERENCE KELLY

Fleet Street, Dublin

NEW BUSINESS PREMISES

Mr. TERENCE KELLY'S NEW SALE DEPARMENT, FLEET STREET

Mr. Terence Kelly, who for many years has occupied a foremost place among city pawnbrokers, is now making a move in a new direction. Yesterday there took place the formal opening of his new establishment in Fleet Street, with a really magnificent stock of jewellery, silver plate of all kinds, watches, clocks, etc. Formerly the space abutting on Fleet Street was used for storage purposes, but the proprietor has wisely decided to open a regular emporium in the main thoroughfare. The costly and artistic character of the goods displayed has been kept in view by the architect, and the elegant and luxurious fittings harmonise with the expensive stock in trade. The façade is of cement, treated in a chaste and effective style, and the appearance of the large plate-glass windows, with their very tempting array of jewellery, must attract the attention of the most indifferent passer-by. The internal decorations are quite in keeping with the imposing exterior. The walls are covered in aesthetic Lincrusta Walton in ivory white, except the deep dado, which is of a warm chocolate tint. Inside the counter the floor is of parqueterie, and outside of mosaic. Mahogany counter and show-cases and elaborate brackets of art ironwork set off to the best advantage the precious specimens of the jeweller's art on view in this establishment.

The stock consists of ladies' and gentlemen's watches of the highest class and finish, diamonds, rubies, pearls, and all manner of precious stones, set in a hundred different styles, from the regal tiara to the brooch or ring of every-day use, and including brilliants in single stones and clusters, earrings, pendants, and scarf pins. Then there are gold chains and bangles, and in fact every article made from the precious metal. In silver there is a fine display of trinket boxes, cigar and cigarette-cases, purses, toilet bottles, fish carvers, also silver tea and coffee sets, milk jugs, presentation cups, bowls, trays, and salvers, candlesticks, dessert sets and fish eaters - in a word, every branch of the silversmith's art is well represented. Some special items are ladies dress and gentleman's suit cases with silver fittings, chime clocks etc. In addition to the forfeited goods from his own establishment, Mr. Kelly is constantly purchasing large stocks in London, Manchester, Sheffield, and other English centres, so that he is in a position to give his customers the advantage of his shrewd purchases in the chief markets, and only recently he bought the stock of Messrs. White and Schopperle, Grafton Street. He does not confine himself to watches and jewellery. In his commodious showrooms may be seen Erard and other well-known pianos, bicycles by many makers, cabinets of cutlery, Gladstone bags, opera and field glasses, and a host of other useful and elegant articles. Taken all round, Mr. Kelly's new establishment is worthy of his well-known enterprise and is certain to draw to itself a large share of public patronage. Mr. G.L. O'Conner, Great Brunswick Street, is architect of the new building, Messrs. Kiernan, Talbot Street, the contractors, while Messrs. Fitzgerald, Great Brunswick Street, did the decorations. Messrs. Sage, of London, supplied the shop fittings; Messrs. Cummins the electrical installations, and George Price, Wolverhampton, the massive safes.


Source: Freeman's Journal and Daily Commercial Advertiser - 7th March 1898

The 1901 Irish Census reveals Terence Kelly as a 47 year old Justice of the Peace and Pawnbroker, born in Dublin City. He is married to 46 year old Maryanne, who was also born in Dublin City. They lived with four of their children, Augustene 7, Geneveive 6, Dorothy 5, and Winifred 3 years, all the children were born in Dublin County. The family are Roman Catholics, have two live-in servants, and reside at 373, Palmerston Road, Dublin.

The 1911 Census reveals Terence Kelly, now 57 years old, a Jeweller and Pawnbroker, but not longer stating that he is a J.P. Marryanne Kelly was not resident on the day of the Census, but presumably still alive as Terence Kelly states that he is married, rather than a Widower. The children in residence are different from those in the 1901 Census, this time we have Angela 24, James 23, and Charles 19 years. James was recorded as a Dentist. The children are all unmarried and the family maintain two servants. Their address now is 66, Lower Leeson Street, Dublin. The record also reveals that Terrence and Maryanne Kelly have been married for 32 years, and had 11 children, of whom 10 were living.

The business of White & Schopperle, from whom Terence Kelly purchased their remaining stock, appear in local directories as 'Watchmakers, Goldsmiths and Jewellers', of 33, Grafton Street, Dublin, during the period 1887-1893. As their stock was acquired in c.1898 it is likely they were business a few years longer than the 1893 date.

Trev.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Wed Apr 10, 2013 1:28 pm

CAHOON BROTHERS

16-18, Castle Place, later, 33, Donegal Place, Belfast

Cahoon Brothers were founded sometime before 1877. Their first noted address was 16, Castle Place, Belfast, and by 1901, 16-18, Castle Place. By 1907, they had removed to 33, Donegall Place, with workshops at 27a, Donegall Place.

Only one of the brothers appears to be traceable, that is John Cahoon, and perhaps there was a time when the business was styled in his name only as spoons with his name alone, as that of a retailer, have been noted.

Image

By 1910 they had converted into a limited liability company styled as Cahoon Brothers Ltd.

John Cahoon's private residence was noted as Hopefield Terrace, Antrim Road, Belfast, in 1877, Ardeen, Fort William, Belfast, in 1880.

The 1901 Irish Census reveals John Cahoon as a 73 year old Master Jeweller, born in Co. Down. He is a widower, and lives with his son, James, who is 26 years old, Belfast born, and unmarried, and described as a Jeweller, and daughter Cara, who is 23 years old. They have one boarder and one servant living in. Their religion is noted as Presbyterian and they reside at 42, Sandown Road.

The 1911 Census shows that the family have moved to 112, Malone Avenue. The servant and the boarder have gone, but John's sister, 85 year old Letitia is now in residence. John and James, now James M., are still jewellers. Cara is now recorded as Caroline. Both children are still unmarried.

On the 2nd June 1910, Cahoon Brothers Ltd. entered a mark, 'C B Ltd' with the 'C B' being above the 'Ltd' and contained within a shamrock shaped punch, with the Chester Assay Office. The assay office records note the directors as John Cahoon and James M. Cahoon, both of Rosedale, Earlswood Road, Strandown, Belfast. The secretary noted as George Herron, of 75, Belmont Road, Belfast, and the company's address as 33, Donegal Place, Belfast.

George Herron did not stay in the position of secretary much longer, as in the 1911 Census he was recorded as being a 'Commercial Clerk Motor Car Business'.

The retailer mark of 'J. CAHOON' is also to be found at: Irish Retailer Marks

Trev.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Thu Apr 11, 2013 10:46 am

JOSEPH BERRINGER

36, North Street, Belfast

Joseph Berringer entered his mark 'JB' contained within two conjoined triangles, with the Chester Assay Office on the 26th June 1935. His private residence was recorded by the assay office as 28, Vicarage Park, Belfast.

Trev.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Fri Apr 12, 2013 7:37 am

MICHAEL FACK

32, Grafton Street, Dublin

Michael Fack entered his mark 'M·F' contained within an oblong punch with clipped corners, on the 18th March 1896 with the Chester Assay Office.

The 1901 Irish Census reveals Michael Fack as a 48 year old, English born, Silversmith. He is married to 46 year old, English born, Louisa, and they live with their children, Mary Ann 24, Patrick 22, and Louis 16 years. The children are all Dublin born, and Patrick and Louis are described as 'Assistants' presumably to their father's business. The family's religion is recorded as Unitarian, they have one live-in servant, and reside at 38, Strand Road, Dublin.

The family, the only ones recorded in the whole of Ireland with that name, do not appear recorded on the 1911 Irish Census.

Trev.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Mon Apr 15, 2013 4:22 am

JAMES COAKLEY

4, Main Street, Killarney

Image
James Coakley - Killarney - 1896

James Coakley displayed his wares at the Cork Industrial Exhibition of 1883.

The 1901 Irish Census reveals James Coakley as a 79 year old, born in Killarney, Co Kerry. In the census he is described as a Shopkeeper, he is married, but Mrs Coakley was not in residence at the time of the census. He lives with his nephew, 30 year old, James Healy, who is described as a Smith. They reside at 32.1, Main Street, Killarney, and are recorded as Roman Catholics.

There appears to be no record of James Coakley in the 1911 Irish Census.

Trev.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Tue Apr 16, 2013 12:51 pm

PATRICK CAHILL

13, Wellington Quay, Dublin

Image
Patrick Cahill - Dublin - 1902

Image
Patrick Cahill - Dublin - 1907

Obviously never one to hide his light under a bushel, Patrick Keary Cahill even described his occupation in the 1911 Irish Census as 'Optician to His Holiness Pope Pius X, and to his late Holiness Pope Leo XIII'. He was recorded as 59 years old, Dublin born, and a Widower. Also in residence were his unmarried 37 year old daughter, Mary Ester Keary Cahill, and a boarder, 39 year old, Edward John Kearney who was described as an Assistant Optician. They resided at 61, Grove Park, Dublin, and were recorded as Roman Catholics. Patrick Cahill was recorded as having seven children, of whom, four were living.

Trev.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Wed Apr 17, 2013 1:40 pm

JOSEPH W. DAWSON

Kickham Street, Carrick-on-Suir

Image
J.W. Dawson - Carrick-on-Suir - 1889

Joseph W. Dawson appears in Bassett's Directory of Tipperary, 1889 and in the 1894 Waterford Directory at KIckham Street, Carrick-on-Suir, but does not appear in neither the 1901 or 1911 Irish Census.

Trev.


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