Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

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Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

Postby dognose » Mon Nov 09, 2009 3:58 pm

JOHN SMYTH & SONS

17, Wicklow Street, and 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, Wicklow Lane, Dublin

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John Smyth & Sons - Dublin - 1881

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John Smyth & Sons - Dublin - 1897

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John Smyth & Sons - Dublin - 1900

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John Smyth & Sons - Dublin - 1900

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John Smyth & Sons - Dublin - 1903

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John Smyth & Sons - Dublin - 1904

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John Smyth & Sons - Dublin - 1905

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John Smyth & Sons - Dublin - Undated

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John Smyth & Sons - Dublin - 1907

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John Smyth & Sons - Dublin - 1920

The business was founded in 1840 by John Smyth. Following his demise, the firm was run by his three sons, John , Thomas, and Francis.



John Smyth & Sons, Church Plate Manufacturers, 17, Wicklow Street.

The most noted establishment, and one that will well repay a visit to those interested in a most beautiful and important branch of industry, is that of Messrs. Smyth & Sons, who for many years have occupied a position of great eminence as manufacturers of all descriptions of church plate used in the services of the Catholic Church. The firm occupy handsome and extensive premises at 17, Wicklow Street, their important factory and workshops being situated at Nos. 1, 2, 3, Wicklow Lane. The warehouse is most tastefully fitted throughout. Messrs. Smyth & Sons are very large employers of labour, as many as fifty hands being kept constantly employed at their factory in the manufacture of the various sacred vessels and articles of altar decoration made by the house, which was established in 1840. At an early period in its career it acquired a brilliant reputation for the quality, high artistic excellence, and general superiority of workmanship displayed in the articles of its manufacture; and the high name, thus worthily and deservedly won, it has been the constant effort of its management to maintain unimpaired. One has only to look at the present prosperous condition of the house, and the high repute in which its manufactures are held, to recognise how successful this effort has proved. The stock, which is Large and valuable, includes chalices, ciboriums, monstrances, thuribles, candiesticks and other altar decorations, and, in fact, as has been said, all the various articles used upon the altars of Catholic churches. Many of those designs are exceedingly beautiful, and display not merely the most exquisite taste but also the most perfect workmanship in gold and silver. Some of the reproductions in brass of mediaeval candlesticks, flower vases, etc., are admirable specimens of work ; while many of the modem designs ran the latter close in artistic elegance. About 5,000 ounces of silver are annually used by the firm. The firm do a large trade in supplying the Catholic clergy all over Ireland with those objects, and also do a considerable business in the work of repairing, remodelling, and re-lacquering all description of brass goods, such as lamps, candlesticks, etc., their house being in fact a kind of church repository. Some of the specimens of altar lamps, those which are used to hang from the roof of the sanctuary, struck us as being of exquisitely chaste design ; some being in the French-Gothic style and beautifully chased and chiselled. We are glad to know that home manufacture is here asserting itself in a direction where it deserves the fullest support; there having been for many years too great a tendency on the part of church authorities to go to London, Paris, or Munich for work, which Messrs. Smyth & Sons have proved can be supplied at home, of as excellent workmanship, and at as moderate a price.


Source: Industries of Ireland - 1887



JOHN SMYTH & SONS, Mediaeval and Italian Metal Workers in Gold and Silver, Electroplaters, Gilders, &c, 17, Wicklow Street, Dublin.

For the lengthened period of upwards of half a century past the eminent firm of Messrs. John Smyth And Sons, artists in metal, wood, and stone; manufacturers of articles for ecclesiastical, civic, and domestic purposes, etc., has sustained a unique reputation for the artistic superiority of the productions of the house. which are in every respect worthy of the best traditions of Irish industry. The history of the firm dates back to 1840, when the business was founded by the late Mr. John Smyth, who was subsequently joined in the proprietary by his three sons, now the sole representatives, viz., Messrs. John, Thomas, and Francis, who continue the trade under the style indicated above. The premises occupied by Messrs. Smyth comprise commodious warehouse and showroom at 17, Wicklow Street, and extensive factory at 1, 2, 3, and 4, Wicklow Lane. The showrooms are of spacious proportions and well fitted throughout and are conveniently adapted for the effective exhibition of the wide range of beautiful and artistic goods submitted for inspection. These include chastely designed chalices, ciboriums, monstrances, thuribles-, candlesticks, and other altar decorations; and ecclesiastical accessories in gold, silver, and metal, many of these articles being faithful reproductions of designs in mediaeval art-work of the earlier schools. Messrs. Smyth's works in Wicklow Lane are replete with modern plant and machinery for producing in perfection the specialities for which the firm is noted. A powerful Crossley's "Otto" gas engine, of 14 h.p., supplies the motive force to the various machines, amongst which may be mentioned a Root's blower for facilitating the process of metal melting and providing draught for the casting furnace. Large vats, for the electroplating and gilding, are constantly kept going to supply the requirements of this branch of the trade, and some indication of the magnitude of the operations of the proprietors is afforded by the fact that upwards of 5,000 ounces of silver and many tons of brass and other alloys are annually used in the manufactory. We also were shown a department specially fitted up for the repair and re-lacquering of church brass work, to which the firm give particular attention. An extensive and valuable clientele has been established by the firm, which embraces in its widespread connection the leading Catholic clergy in Ireland and other parts of the kingdom, the uniform excellence of design and finished workmanship in these artistic productions having demonstrated to the principal ecclesiastical authorities in the country that their requirements may be fulfilled with equal facility and native industry fostered and encouraged by their placing their orders with this house. In conclusion we Would refer our readers to a very beautiful and artistically-got-up price list, issued by Messrs. Smyth, containing many pages of illustrations of their leading specialities in ecclesiastical requisites, which will be found of invaluable service to the clergy in districts remote from Dublin, and who have consequently no opportunity of inspecting the comprehensive and valuable stock on view in the showrooms of the firm.


Source: Dublin, Cork, and South of Ireland: A Literary, Commercial, and Social Review - 1892


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Postby dognose » Fri Nov 13, 2009 11:38 am

Mc DOWELL BROTHERS

27, Henry Street, and 10, South Gt. George's Street, Dublin

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M'Dowell Brothers - Dublin - 1907

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McDowell Brothers - Dublin - 1920

McDowell Brothers have been noted at 27, Henry Street since 1866, at the same period they had premises 20, Wellington Quay and at 71, Grafton Street in 1875.

Established in 1845, they registered their mark at the Dublin Assay Office in 1875.


McDowell Bros., Jewellers, Watchmakers, and Manufacturers of Irish Ornaments, 27, Henry Street, and 39 and 42, Lower O'Connell Street, and 10, South Great Georges Street

One of the oldest and most respectable establishments connected with the great industry with which its name has so long and so honourably been associated, is that of Messrs. McDowell Bros., who occupy handsome and commodious premises at the above addresses. Founded now more than forty years ago, the house has long enjoyed the utmost popularity among all classes of the citizens of the Irish metropolis, and has, during its long and prosperous career, formed a connection which may compare with that of most houses in the trade. The premises occupied by Messrs. McDowell Bros., in Henry Street, are rather square in form, the handsome frontage measuring about twenty-three feet across, and the interior decoration, fittings, and appointments, having been conceived and carried out in the best possible taste. The stock is large and valuable, and comprises a number of high-class clocks and watches, all of the firm's own manufacture, and reflecting the highest credit on the skill and workmanship of the makers. Some of the watches made for ladies' use we particularly noticed, and were much struck by the beauty and elegance of their design, and the admirable quality of their finish. We know it is the fashion to praise loudly the workmanship of Parisian makers in this especial line, and we are not going to say a word against a nation like the French, who have certainly in the fullest degree this gift of artistic perception and execution which we denominate taste; but we venture to affirm, without fear of contradiction, that there are watches in the stock of Messrs. McDowell Bros., and manufactured by themselves moreover, which in point of elegance, beauty of design, taste, or call it what you will, are quite equal to any made either in Paris or elsewhere on equal terms. Among the clocks there are some beautiful designs in drawing-room clocks, conceived and executed in the highest style of art, and at prices marvellously moderate. We also noticed some handsome and new designs in eight-day English hall clocks, which struck us as being excellent both in design and workmanship. The firm, likewise, have a large assortment of wood and marble dining-room clocks. Besides their comprehensive assortment of timepieces, Messrs. McDowell Bros, are distinguished as manufacturers of bog-oak ornaments, which are becoming more and more appreciated in the highest circles, and certainly the beautiful designs in this artistic line of jewellery turned out by this firm deserve the patronage that is accorded to them. The beautiful settings in Connemara marble are now to be best seen decorating the elite of the drawing-room or promenade. In particular the splendid brooches, earrings, and hand rings, set with their Irish diamonds, call for the highest encomiums from the artistic world. As presents for friends abroad we know of no more useful and applicable articles that will revive in the exile's breast the love for the old land. In addition to the specialities already mentioned, Messrs. McDowell Bros, have also a varied supply of articles of jewellery, such as fine gold earrings, brooches and bracelets, and gem, keeper, and all other sorts of rings. Another branch of the trade is that of silver and electro plated sugar-bowls or basins, ewers, tea-pots, cruet-stands, and other articles for the tea or dining-table. The firm are exhibiting a stand of Irish made jewellery at the London "Irish Exhibition," and employ about fifteen hands in carrying on their important business. We shall here take leave of Messrs. McDowell Bros. very prosperous house, merely remarking by way of conclusion that the firm are popular among the Dublin commercial classes, and are widely esteemed for the honourable way in which they conduct their business.


Source: Industries of Dublin - 1887

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Postby dognose » Wed Dec 02, 2009 10:55 am

HOPKINS & HOPKINS

Late Law & Sons

1, Sackville Street Lower, Dublin

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Hopkins & Hopkins - Dublin - 1897

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Hopkins & Hopkins - Dublin - 1902

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Hopkins & Hopkins - Dublin - 1902

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Hopkins & Hopkins - Dublin - 1903

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Hopkins & Hopkins - Dublin - 1904

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Hopkins & Hopkins - Dublin - 1905

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Hopkins & Hopkins - Dublin - 1907

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Hopkins & Hopkins - Dublin - 1915

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Hopkins & Hopkins - Dublin - 1917

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Hopkins & Hopkins - Dublin - 1920


Hopkins & Hopkins entered their mark, 'H & H', contained within an oblong punch, with the Dublin Assay Office in 1883.

Hopkins & Hopkins's premises were badly damaged during the Easter Rising of 1916.

Believed to be in business until 1974.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Early 20th Century

Postby dognose » Mon Jul 19, 2010 11:02 am

CAMPBELL & COMPANY

10, to 17, Smithfield, Belfast

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Campbell & Company - Belfast - 1904

Established in 1850.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Early 20th Century

Postby dognose » Thu Aug 09, 2012 5:29 pm

T. DILLON & SONS

1, William Street, Galway and Athlone

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T. Dillon - Galway and Athlone - 1902

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T. Dillon & Sons - Galway and Athlone - 1904

Established in 1750, and still in business today. Amongst their most famous clients were JFK, John Wayne, Bing Crosby, Walt Disney, Princess Grace and Prince Rainear of Monaco, and Winston Churchill. Claddagh rings made by T. Dillon & Sons have, besides the Dublin Assay Office mark, the word 'Original' struck on them.

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Thomas Dillon Snr. was the brother of Richard Dillon (see below post), they were the sons of the Watchmaker, Jonathan Dillon, and the grandsons of the Goldsmith Joseph Dillon, all of Waterford. Richard Dillon remained in Waterford after his brother removed to Galway in 1850.

It is thought Thomas Dillon Snr. and his brother Richard worked together in the late 1840's, the most noteworthy of their work being the Claddagh ring that was presented to Queen Victoria c.1849.

Thomas Dillon Snr. was recorded in the Irish Census of 1901 as a 74 year old Jeweller, born in Waterford City, married to Maria, who was 67 years old and born in Mauritius. They resided at 2, William Street, along with son Thomas, aged 41 years and described as a Watchmaker, son William, aged 37 years and described as a Jeweller, and daughters, Emily 29, and Elizabeth 25. The Dillon family were noted as Wesleyan Methodists.

Thomas Dillon Jnr. was recorded in the Irish Census of 1911 as a 51 year old Jeweller and Watchmaker, born in Galway, married to Mary Ann, who was 45 years old and born in England. They had been married for 7 years, resided at 43, Collage Road, Galway, and their religion noted as Church of Ireland.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Early 20th Century

Postby dognose » Sat Aug 11, 2012 1:31 pm

STEEL & SONS

16, High Street, Belfast (1877). 39, Ann Street, Belfast (1885). 113, Royal Avenue, Belfast (1890).

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Steel & Sons - Belfast - 1885

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Steel & Sons - Belfast - Undated

The business of Robert and David Steel was first noted in 1877, and still around in 1900 and perhaps later.

A football trophy presented by this firm in 1895 is still played for today. See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steel_%26_Sons_Cup" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Steel & Sons Ltd. registered their mark (an heraldic shield with S & S above Ld) at the Sheffield Assay Office in December 1884.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Early 20th Century

Postby dognose » Sun Aug 12, 2012 8:03 am

GANTER BROTHERS

63, South Great George Street, and 14, Essex Quay, Dublin

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Ganter Brothers - Dublin - 1900

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Ganter Brothers - Dublin - 1904

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Ganter Brothers - Dublin - 1905

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Ganter Brothers - Dublin - 1907

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Ganter Brothers - Dublin - 1915

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Ganter Brothers - Dublin - 1920

Established in 1856

14, Essex Quay was the location of the workshop of Henry Rooke in 1800, and in the early 1850's those premises were occupied by the Watch and Clockmaker, Jeweller, and Goldsmith, Robert Hampson.

The Ganters were another German immigrant family, the Irish Census of 1901 records a 73 year old Adolph Ganter, Watchmaker, born in Baden, Germany, he was married to 58 year old Catherine, who was also born in Baden. They resided at 63, George Street South, with sons, Joseph 34 years old, Watchmaker, Charles 32 years old, Watchmaker, Frederick 28 years old, Clockmaker, Leo, 23 years old, Clockmaker, and daughter Bertha aged 20 years. The family were Roman Catholics.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Early 20th Century

Postby dognose » Sun Aug 12, 2012 9:31 am

KANE & GUNNING later GUNNING & REYNOLDS later GUNNING & Co.

7, 8, 9, Price's Lane, and 18, Fleet Street, Dublin

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Kane & Gunning - Dublin - 1896

Kane & Gunning entered their mark, 'K & G' without outline, at the Dublin Assay Office in 1894.

At some point between 1896 and 1903 the business was restyled to Gunning & Reynolds.

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Gunning & Reynolds - Dublin - 1903

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Gunning & Reynolds - Dublin - 1904

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Gunning & Reynolds - Dublin - 1905


At some time between 1911 and 1920, the firm appear to have been restyled as 'Gunning & Co.':

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Gunning & Co. - Dublin - 1920


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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Early 20th Century

Postby dognose » Sun Aug 12, 2012 9:34 am

JOHN R. RYAN & Co.

14, College Green, Dublin

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J.R. Ryan & Co. - Dublin - 1904

Ringing the Changes.
Recently the keen eye of Mr. Ryan, a jeweller of College Green, Dublin, espied outside his establishment a young gentleman scanning the contents of his window after the manner of a customer, and accordingly the man of gems made ready for emergencies. Presently the gentleman entered, and said he wished to purchase an engagement ring, and a tray of these articles was placed before him. Whilst examining the engagement sealers he managed to replace one of the diamond rings with a counterfeit, but not cleverly enough to elude those eyes that had been on him so long. As soon as the thief found his trick had been discovered, he dashed out of the shop, and unfortunately this time he was too quick for the jeweller.


Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 2nd April 1894


John R Ryan & Co. entered their marks at the Dublin Assay Office in 1864 and 1909.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Early 20th Century

Postby dognose » Sun Aug 12, 2012 10:03 am

J.J. KELLY

5, Fleet Street, Dublin

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J.J. Kelly - Dublin - 1904

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J.J. Kelly - Dublin - 1904

5, Fleet Street was formerly the workshop of B S Brunton in 1832 and of Edmund Johnson in 1825 and prior to that was the premises of Patrick Moore in 1812.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Early 20th Century

Postby dognose » Sun Aug 12, 2012 10:07 am

PATRICK DONEGAN

32, Dame Street, Dublin

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Patrick Donegan - Dublin - 1904

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Patrick Donegan - Dublin - Undated

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Patrick Donegan - Dublin - 1907

Successor to his brother, John Donegan. Donegan's had been at 32, Dame Street since 1853.



Patrick Donegan, Watch Manufacturer, 32, Dame Street.

This is a very old and firmly established business, and has been in existence for over half a century. The premises in Dame Street comprise an admirably arranged establishment, with a street frontage of twenty-four feet by a depth of ninety-five feet. The shop itself is handsomely appointed, and, with the various articles for sale arranged in an artistic way, forms a very striking exhibition. There is, too, always a fine show in the windows of watches, plate, Sheffield ware, and church ornaments, a large stock of which is to be seen within. In the workshops and factories from forty to fifty skilled hands are kept continually employed in manufacturing and repairing watches. Only skilled and experienced men are employed, which is a guarantee for the excellence of the workmanship turned out. There is a splendid and valuable collection of silver plate in the newest and latest styles. The stock on hand consists of spoons, forks, tankards, mugs, claret jugs, biscuit and sardine boxes, cruets, spirit stands, salvers, epergnes, and many other articles of electro ware, all most beautifully executed and finished. The prices will be found as low and as reasonable as is at all compatible with real value. The house has a large connection amongst the churches in the city and all through the country. Old gold and silver, diamonds and ornaments, and precious stones, will be bought at their highest market value. Mr. Donegan's business has reached its present dimensions and gained its high reputation by giving full value for money, and so long as he pursues this policy so long will he not only maintain his position but improve it, and add daily to the high reputation his house already enjoys.

Source: Industries of Dublin - 1887


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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Early 20th Century

Postby dognose » Fri Aug 17, 2012 2:41 pm

SHARMAN D. NEILL

12, Donegall Place, Belfast


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Sharman D. Neill - Belfast - 1886

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Sharman D. Neill - Belfast - 1896

Sharman Dermott Neill continued the business of his father, James Neill, at Donegall Place, Belfast as from 1885. Sharman was the grandson of Robert Neill, he died in 1934. The Business carried on until at least 1936.

In 1906 they became a limited liability company, the directors being noted as: Sharman D. Neil, Thomas Caldwell, Henry Hamilton, and George W. Smallwood.

Sharman D. Neill lost both his sons in WWI. His private residence was noted in 1903 as: Martello Terrace, Hollywood, Co. Down.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Early 20th Century

Postby dognose » Mon Aug 27, 2012 9:46 am

GIBSON & Co.

2, Donegall Place, and 34 & 36, Castle Place, Belfast

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William Gibson - Belfast - 1874

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Gibson & Co.Ltd. - Belfast - 1893


Founded c.1860 by William Gibson, who was later, along with John Lawrence Langman, to become the founder of the Goldsmiths and Silversmiths Co. Gibson & Co. displayed their wares at the Dublin Exhibition in 1865, the Philadelphia Exhibition in 1876, and the Paris Exhibition of 1878. They had factories at Belfast, London, Sheffield, and Paris.

William Gibson died on the 1st November 1913, aged 74 years.

Gibson & Co. were incorporated with Sharman D. Neil Ltd. by 1931.


Gibson & Co.Ltd. box detail:

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Early 20th Century

Postby dognose » Fri Aug 31, 2012 10:45 am

GEORGE WATERHOUSE & Co.

25, 26, Dame Street, Dublin

'I was going along Dame Street and I spotted a fine tart under Waterhouse's clock, and said good-night' - James Joyce - Dubliners

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Waterhouse and Company - Dublin - 1846

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Waterhouse and Company - Dublin - 1849

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Waterhouse and Company - Dublin - 1854

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Waterhouse and Company - Dublin - 1878

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Waterhouse & Company - Dublin - 1897

George Waterhouse & Co. had premises in Dame Street, Dublin, from the years 1842 until 1960.

They displayed their products at the Great Exhibition in London in 1851 and the Great Industrial Exhibition in Dublin in 1853.


Waterhouse & Company, Jewellers, Silversmiths, etc.. 25 and 20, Dame Street.

The distinguished firm of Waterhouse & Company, jewellers, silversmiths, and watchmakers, of the above address, is one of the oldest and most important commercial institutions in its line in the city. It has been established for close upon half a century, and has obtained a very high reputation amongst all classes. The company have had the honour of being specially appointed jewellers, silversmiths, and watchmakers, to Her Majesty the Queen, in 1848, to His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales, in 1868, and to the various Lord Lieuteuants of Ireland. The premises in Dame Street are large and imposing, the windows are always decked out and dressed in the most elaborate and artistic way with various triumphs of the jeweller's, watchmaker's, and clockmaker's arts. The shop and showrooms are handsomely fitted up, and contain a magnificent display, whose beauty, richness, variety, and value, are certainly among the best in Dublin, or even in Ireland itself. Silver and electro silver plate of every description, and of the most superior character, both in material, design, and execution, find a prominent place and form a magnificent show. The stock of diamonds, rubies, pearls, emeralds, sapphires, and other precious stones, both mounted and unmounted, is of great value. Presentation plate, such as racing cups, sporting trophies, agricultural prizes, are to be obtained here, also church plate and communion services, all splendid specimens of the gold and silversmith's craft. There is a large stock of watches and clocks, of Irish, English, and Swiss make, always kept on hand for sale. They will all be found good timekeepers and most reliable, and their price will be found most moderate. Repairs of all kinds will be promptly and efficiently done by skilled and experienced workmen on the premises. Vie control of the business is in the hands of Mr. Waterhouse, to whom is due the great success and high position which this house has won for itself. By great energy, combined with caution, and gradually feeling his way, he has built up this large and important business until it has become one of the leading houses in its line. Besides holding the special appointments referred to above, the house enjoys the patronage of the nobility, leading gentry, and the upper classes in general, who all speak in high terms of the goods supplied to them. In fine, the firm, by the judicious and careful enterprise of their managers, have brought it to its present prominence as a jeweller's and watchmaker's of the first importance all over the country, and especially in the metropolis itself.


Source: Industries of Dublin - 1887


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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the 20th Century

Postby dognose » Mon Sep 10, 2012 11:20 am

LEE BROTHERS

Dublin

Lee Brothers were established in 1943. Their start in business was an opportunist venture to take advantage of the interruption of the importation of jewellery into Ireland as a consequence of World War II. British manufacturers had almost a monopoly supplying the Dublin retailers prior to the war, but as time moved on, and stocks began to dwindle more and more, the retailers started to look to local craftsmen to supply their needs.

It was the initiative of two brothers, Thomas & Christopher Lee, who seized the opportunity to start a business that would fill the gap left by the absence of the traditional jewellery suppliers. Both of the brothers had previous experience of working in the jewellery trade, Thomas in London & Christopher in Dublin, but no doubt, their immediate problem would have been that of a regular supply of raw material required for jewellery manufacture, gold and silver. This was solved by striking a deal with a major player in the Dublin pawnbroking trade, Thomas O’Connor, and with workshops acquired in Pearse Street, Dublin, production of jewellery started in 1943. The business was an immediate success and the brother's firm flourished, having most of the larger Dublin retailers amongst their customers. In that same year, 1943, they were joined by another brother, Patrick, who in time was to become the longest serving member of the family business, staying with the firm until 2003.

Thomas and Christopher Lee unfortunately both died at a young age, and another brother, Charles, took over the running of the company and steered the business through the difficult period following the end of the war and facing the competition of returning British jewellery suppliers. New, more spacious, premises were acquired at Eustace Street, and Lee Brothers extended their customer network beyond Dublin to cover the whole of Ireland and thus secured the future of the company. During the period of the 1950's to the 1970's, the business had a workforce peaking at 36 employees.

The year 1966 saw the company move again, this time to Moore Lane, where a large investment in sophisticated machinery was made and Lee Brothers expanded their production into the manufacture of high quality medals and badges. In 1992, John Lee took over the reins of the company following the retirement of Charles. The 1980's and the 1990's had seen the firms share of the jewellery market go into decline and the decision was made to end the production of jewellery, and concentrate on the manufacture of medals and badges.

In 2001, Lee Brothers (Jewellers) Limited entered their mark at the Edinburgh Assay Office, L.B without surround.

The company is still in business today and are now located in Santry, near Dublin Airport.

Yet to be 100% confirmed, but an example of what is thought likely to be the work and marks of Lee Brothers:

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the 20th Century

Postby dognose » Tue Oct 02, 2012 6:21 pm

KAPP & PETERSON

53-55, later, 111, later, 117, Grafton Street, and 55, South King Street, and 113, Stephen's Green, Dublin. 53, New Broad Street, London EC

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Kapp & Peterson, Ltd. - Dublin - 1897

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Kapp & Peterson, Ltd. - Dublin - 1917

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Kapp & Peterson, Ltd. - Dublin - 1923

Friedrich and Heinrich Kapp from Nurnberg founded their business, styled as Kapp Brothers, in Grafton Street, Dublin in c.1860. They specialised in the manufacture of Meerschaum and Briar Root pipes. They were later joined by pipe designer Charles Peterson and the firm was renamed Kapp & Peterson.

Charles Christopher Peterson was born on the 4th March 1852 at Riga, Latvia, he died on the 11th September 1919 at Hamburg, Germany.

Kapp & Peterson exhibited their products at the Paris International exhibition in 1900.

Kapp Brothers entered their mark (KAPP BROS) at the Dublin Assay Office in 1861, and Kapp & Peterson (K & P) in 1893.

Kapp & Peterson are still in business today.


Messrs. Kapp Bros., Sole Meerschaum and Briar Pipe Manufacturers In Ireland, 53. Grafton Street, and 55 and 56, South King Street

This well established and highly respectable firm of pipe manufacturers, Who are the proprietors of extensive, commodious, and fashionably fitted premises in Grafton Street, extending into South King Street, are one of the best known establishments connected with the cigar and tobacco trade in the fashionable and select quarter of the south side. To most non-smokers the peculiar attraction which the consumption of the tobacco-plant in its manufactured form possesses for its votaries must ever remain as a ''sealed book," but all will acknowledge how widespread the custom is, and how large a part the tobacco plays in creating the wealth and adding to the revenue of the country at large. How many minor pleasures would not the habitual smoker readily forego rather than give up his favourite enjoyment, and from the peer, in the smoking-room of his luxurious club, down to the peasant in his cabin, there is no section of society in which men may not be found who would probably more readily renounce their principal meal than the society and comforting influence of the weed. The late Charles Kingsley was one of the most ardent worshippers of the tobacco god, and perhaps there is not in the whole range of English literature a more magnificent eulogium on the use of tobacco than is to be found in that lamented and gifted writer's famous novel of " Westward Ho!" Those at least who agree with Canon Kingsley will admit that the man who does the most towards the furtherance of the practice of tobacco smoking should be looked upon as a kind of public benefactor, and though we should be slow even in jest to so much exaggerate its importance, we cannot fail to recognise with gratitude the great attention shown to the comforts of the tobacco-smoking public by the respected firm which is the subject of this notice. Messrs. Kapps premises are admirably stocked with all the heart of man can desire in the way of tobacco, the supply embracing, with a most commendable catholicity, every species of the weed, from the most expensive to the most moderate in figure. The firm claims to be the sole manufacturers of meerschaum and briar pipes in Ireland, and certainly the immense stock to be seen at their establishment justifies, if it does not entirely explain, the monopoly, as they do not possess one single piece of imitation in amber, meerschaum, or briar. The carving of some of the articles is simply perfect, the pipes being perfectly free from flaw or blemish, and recommending themselves, from an artistic point of view, to the commendation of the most cultivated taste. The firm, which was established in Dublin about fifteen years ago, has recently added, as an attraction to the Dublin public, a spacious and handsomely fitted billiard and smoking room, which is apparently much appreciated and largely patronised by the 'j.unsse dorée' of the Irish metropolis, and which has done much to augment the already large circle of supporters of which the house can boast. Messrs. Kapp are at present introducing a noted speciality in the shape of pipes made from Irish Meerschaum. The partners have entered into this branch with great zest, as its development may result in the building up of a new department of industry. The meerschaum is found near Collen, in the county of Antrim, and lies in flakes between the limestone rocks, from sixty to eighty feet underground. The quality of the commodity is really first-class, and already large numbers of orders have been received by the house for pipes made from this home product. The grain of the material is fine, and its weight and colour compare favourably with the great bulk of meerschaum procured from the East. Indeed, judging from the all-round excellence of the finished pipes made from this Irish meerschaum, it may be confidently predicted that Messrs. Kapp are certain to obtain a widespread sale for their productions in this department of their constantly expanding business. The quality of the cigars and tobacco sold by Messrs. Kapp is of the finest description, the former being selected as a stock with the utmost care, and can be guaranteed to be in the most perfect condition, as well as a large assortment of tobacco-pouches, cigar and cigarette-holders, novelty match-boxes, and other interesting objects generally to be found in shops of this description, at prices to suit all.


Source: Industries of Dublin - 1887

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the 20th Century

Postby dognose » Wed Oct 24, 2012 5:01 am

G.B. COOKE

Wexford

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G.B. Cooke - Wexford - 1903

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the 20th Century

Postby dognose » Mon Nov 12, 2012 6:57 pm

EDMOND JOHNSON Ltd.

94 & 95, Grafton Street, Dublin

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Edmond Johnson - Dublin - 1901

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Edmond Johnson - Dublin - 1920

The business of Edmund Johnson could be traced back to the 1760's. They were converted into a limited liability company in 1897. The company was wound up in 1925.

They entered marks at the Dublin and London assay offices.


EDMOND JOHNSON, Manufacturing Jeweller, 94 and 95, Grafton Street; and 46, Wicklow Street, Dublin.

The records of Irish commercial enterprise furnish no more striking instance of continuous success than is afforded by the splendid establishment of Mr. Edmond Johnson, which is not only the premier house in the trade in the City, but the oldest established jeweller's business in Ireland. This undertaking was originally founded A.d. 1760 by Mr. James Johnson, Wholesale Jewellery Manufacturer, and was continued by that gentleman until 1791, when he was succeeded by his son, Mr. Joseph Johnson. On the death of the latter gentleman in 1832, the business reverted to his successor, Mr. Edmond Johnson, who held the control until 1863, when it passed into the possession of his son, the present proprietor, a record of continuity in one family perhaps unexampled in the history of this trade in the country.

The premises in Grafton Street comprise a magnificent block of building with attractive frontage, elaborately decorated in black and gold, the elevation being four stories in height and commanding a splendid corner position at the junction of Grafton and Wicklow Streets. The noble plate-glass windows are devoted to a recherché display of the highest class gold and gem jewellery in artistic designs, costly gold and silver watches, clocks, and timepieces in rich variety, silver plate, and an immense assortment of valuable articles, objects d'art and bijouterie of the most beautiful description. The interior of the establishment is of lofty and commodious proportions, appropriately in harmony with the external surroundings, and appointed throughout with handsome ebonized show cases exhibiting in glittering profusion an infinite variety of goods of the highest quality of workmanship. Of these special attention is directed to a unique department of the jeweller's art which Mr. Johnson has made peculiarly his own, and which certainly entitles him to rank in the highest grade in his profession–the manufacture of copies of ancient Irish art; and as an art jeweller this gentleman is unrivalled in the three kingdoms, his collection of antique plate (of which he is an expert connoisseur) being the finest exhibition of this class of work existing. It contains numerous authentic specimens of the Charles's, Cromwell, and Queen Anne periods, of rare designs and the richest workmanship, of inestimable value to the virtuoso or collector.

The manufacturing departments on the premises are conducted in spacious and well lighted workrooms, in which are produced the magnificent jewellery and diamond work displayed in the establishment. This forms an exceptional special feature of the business, Mr. Johnson having had a lifelong experience in all branches of the jeweller's and diamond setter's handicraft, and many of the skilled operatives employed in the factory have been trained from their boyhood in the establishment. The business throughout is exclusively high class in character, many of the articles exhibited being of fabulous value–one pair of single stone diamond earrings submitted for our inspection on the occasion of our visit being valued at £1,000. and a whole necklace of stones of nearly equal size must have been worth literally a king's ransom. The clientèle established by Mr. Johnson is of a most influential character, including the distinguished patronage of the principal members of the Vice-regal Court and the leading nobility and landed gentry in the capital and other parts of Ireland. Nor is the business confined to this side of the Channel exclusively, many orders being executed for England and elsewhere from clients to whom the reputation for refined taste and highly finished workmanship of every article supplied from this eminently representative establishment has penetrated.


Source: Dublin, Cork, and South of Ireland: A Literary, Commercial, and Social Review - 1892


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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the 20th Century

Postby dognose » Wed Nov 14, 2012 4:09 pm

WEKLER & SCHLEGEL

60, Upper Stephen Street, and 36, South Great George's Street, Dublin.

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Wekler & Schlegel - Dublin - 1900

Established in 1865.

The origins of this firm appear to be with John B.(Baptist?) Wekler, who was recorded as working in 1874. In 1898 they were styled Wekler, Schunhart & Schlegel (John? Wekler, Joseph? Schunhart and John? Schlegel). By 1900 styled Wekler & Schlegel.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the 20th Century

Postby dognose » Fri Dec 07, 2012 1:30 pm

THE JEWELLERY & METAL Mfg. Co. of IRELAND Ltd.

37, Lower Kevin Street, Dublin

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Box detail - 1939

In business at least from the 1920's until at least the 1970's.

They were converted into a limited liability company on the 26th October 1925 with a registered address of 17, Wood Street, Dublin.

Kevin Lee, another of the Lee Brothers (see above post) worked for The Jewellery & Metal Manufacturing Company of Ireland in the early 1930's

They were registered with the Dublin Assay Office and are thought to have used various marks used including 'J.M.Co.', 'J&M.Co.'

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