Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Mon Jun 15, 2015 4:56 am

The Iowa Legislature has presented Kate Shelby with a handsome medal valued at $150 and $200 in money, in recognition of her heroic act in preventing, on the night of July 6, 1881, at the risk of her life, a disaster on the Chicago and Northwestern Railroad near Moingona, Ia., which would have resulted, but for her, in an appalling loss of human life. The medal has been prepared by Tiffany & Co., of New York, and represents Kate in the act of crossing the railway bridge over the Des Moines river. Above are the words: "Heroism, Youth, Humanity;" on the reverse of the medal is the following inscription: "Presented by the State of Iowa to Kate Shelby, with the thanks of the General Assembly. In recognition of the courage and devotion of a child of fifteen years, whom neither the terror of the elements nor the fear of death could appal in her efforts to save human life during the terrible storm and flood in the Des Moines Valley, on the night of July 6, 1881."

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - February 1884

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Tue Jun 16, 2015 4:50 am

We have received several letters complaining of the transactions of E. P. Tiffany & Co., of 195 Fulton street. This firm was in the habit of soliciting orders from the country for jewelry, receiving the money and never sending either goods or money in return. Finally the firm sold their business through alleged misrepresentation to I. A. Smith for $2,500 and then left the State. When Mr. Smith found out that he had been swindled, he was obliged to make an assignment to J. M. Chapman, who announces that the assets are between $700 and $800 of which $600 is preferred. This bogus firm of Tiffany & Co. did quite an extensive business, as country people supposed they were dealing with the old and well known house of Tiffany & Co., of Union Square. This latter firm received many letters of complaint, and the police and postal authorities were notified of the swindling transactions of E. P. Tiffany & Co., but the birds had flown before they could be arrested. It is an old trick of adventurers to copy as nearly as they dare the name of some well known firm and delude the public with bogus wares or swindling schemes. Such rascals are classed in the same category as " sawdust swindlers " and " bunco steerers," and as it is impossible to forewarn the public regarding each one, it is necessary to be constantly on the alert for them and expose them when they are found out.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - June 1884

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Mon Jun 22, 2015 3:40 am

STARTED WITH STATIONERY

An Interesting Bit of Tiffany HIstory.—There was an interesting statement in one of Tiffany & Co.'s advertisements the other day. It was in reference to their wedding stationery, and mentioned the fact that the stationery department formed a prominent feature of their business when the house was established in 1837. Doubtless most of Tiffany's patrons of the present generation are under the impression that stationery was an afterthought with this great house, and that copper plate engraving is only a natural expansion of their silver engraving department.

"This is far from the fact," said Mr. C. L. Tiffany, who has just passed his eighty-sixth birthday. "When I started in business sixty years ago, down at 259 Broadway, my stock consisted of choice and novel objects in bric-a-brac; Chinese goods, which were then very popular; fine stationery, cabinets, and fancy articles generally; but no part of my first stock interested me more than the stationery." And then, pulling open a draw of his desk, he dug out from under a pile of old documents a large sheet of writing paper. It was of fine texture, and, although yellow with age, the several creases where it was folded showed no sign of breaking.

"This," said Mr. Tiffany, holding up the parchment-like paper, "is a sample sheet from the first stock that I bought; it is the nucleus of one of the most successful departments of this house. My first stationery stock consisted chiefly of fine note papers and the many little accessories of the writing-desk, inkstands which in those days were always accompanied by the little cups of fine sand, universally used to absorb the ink before blotting paper was invented.

"I remember as though it was yesterday the first inkstand we sold. It was a bronze inkstand, imported, as most of those things were. I sold it to a fashionable society woman, who resided down in Cliff Street, which at that time was an aristocratic part of the city. Our entire force in those days consisted of my partner, and errand boy, and myself. The boy had gone for the day, so, when we closed up the shop, I wrapped up the inkstand and carried it down to Cliff Street myself.

"I shall never forget one of my first big purchases, two or three years later. Word reached the city that a consignment of fine Japanese goods had arrived in Boston. It occurred to me that this was a fine opportunity to get some choice new things for our stock ; but we had no ready cash and practically no financial standing. How to raise the money was a problem. I went down to Killingly, my old Connecticut home, and tried to get one of my old associates, who was considered a pretty well-to-do farmer in those parts, to endorse a note for $300 for me. He would do almost anything else for me, with this exception. This rebuff, however, made me only more determined, and I finally found some one with enough confidence in me to endorse the note, which I quickly discounted, and with the money started off to Boston. I invested half of the entire amount in two articles,—a marvellously beautiful Japanese writing-desk and an ornamental table; they each cost $75, and both pieces attracted so much attention, and sold so quickly, that I was sorry there were not more of them.

"After we had removed to 271 Broadway, about ten years later, our stationery department had so developed that we took orders for stamping paper and envelopes; and, as Mr. Cook, the Vice-President of the company well remembers, our facilities were for a long time limited to a little hand-press with a set of block-letters. The whole outfit very much resembled the modern toy printing presses. To-day this branch of the business is almost as well known throughout the world as our dealings in diamonds and other precious stones. By way of illustration I may mention that our foreign mail this morning brought us orders for two thousand visiting-cards from Mexico, and some drafts from other foreign points for stationery orders recently filled; while orders from Japan, Hawaii, Venezuela, and remote parts of the earth are of frequent occurrence.''

Tiffany Co.'s stationery department is to-day practically a business by itself, embracing many distinct departments, occupying almost their entire fourth floor and a large part of the fifth, and requiring a skilled force of over one hundred and fifty men and women. Among the latter are several artists constantly engaged on water-color and illuminated art-work. The other branches of the service include designing, heraldry, copper-plate engraving, steel-die cutting, lithographing, commercial work, printing, stamping, paper-cutting, envelope-making, etc.

Its increasing prosperity is a development of sixty years growth, and a natural result of applying the same business methods and the same standard of work that continues to be the ruling force of the entire establishment.


Source: Journal of the Military Service Institution - 1898

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Tue Jun 23, 2015 4:22 am

The motion for a bill of particulars made by Ten Eyck & Remington, attorneys for the defendant, in the suit brought by T. Wain Morgan Draper against Chas. L. Tiffany to recover $10,000 damages for alleged libel has been granted by Judge Beach, of the Supreme Court. By an order entered Friday last the defendant is to be furnished a bill of particulars specifying items of special damages covering items of material injury to plaintiff's business and of depreciation in money return's to that extent.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 13th December 1893


Tiffany & Co. have just delivered the several prizes offered by the State of New York for superiority in marksmanship.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 13th December 1893

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Thu Jul 02, 2015 3:32 am

The Death of Henry Peters Gray, Jr.

Henry Peters Gray, Jr., an old and honored employe of Tiffany & Co., New York, died June 7, 1897. He was born in New York, April 9, 1844, and received his education in the Eagles Wood Military Academy, Perth Amboy, N. J. In 1861, at the age of 17 years, he enlisted for the war of the rebellion and served with much distinction as adjutant of the 115th New York Volunteers and as Acting Assistant Adjutant-General under General Sheridan. Upon his return from the war, he completed his education, became a tutor, and later entered the employ of Tiffany & Co. as correspondent. He developed exceptional qualifications for this position, and remained in charge of the department for over 26 years, until the Fall of 1895, when his fairing health incapacitated him for the discharge of his duties. His employers and associates shared with his more intimate friends the hope that he would soon recover and resume his place, where he had made many and strong friends; but after lingering for 18 months, he quietly passed away. His mother and a sister survive him.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 16th June 1897

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sun Jul 05, 2015 6:52 am

The solid silver bowl made in 1910 by Tiffany Co. for the Tri-State tennis tournament has been located after being absent from Cincinnati for a number of years and is now in the hands of a local jeweler being prepared for another season of contests. The bowl at the time was considered one of the handsomest in America. It weighs 15½ pounds.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 17th January 1923

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Fri Jul 10, 2015 8:28 am

Image
Tiffany & Co. - New York - 1907

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sat Jul 11, 2015 8:19 am

Among the landmarks which will be found both convenient and useful to the American in Paris is the foreign branch of the extensive jewelry house of Tiffany and Co. The offices of Messrs. Tiffany, Reed, and Co. are at No. 79 Rue Richelieu, within two minutes walk of the Bourse, the Hotel and the Palace of the Louvre, and on the natural route for the pedestrian from either of these points to the splendid Boulevards. As the uncertainties of the jewelry establishments in the Palais Royal are proverbial, no American, anxious to invest in the riches of the world's diamond mart, needs more than this suggestion of the locality of his countrymen.

Source: American Travellers' Guide - William Pembroke Fetridge - 1862

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sun Jul 12, 2015 6:59 am

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Tiffany & Co. - New York - 1907

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Tue Jul 14, 2015 7:13 am

A judgment for costs amounting to $103.52 was entered Thursday against Chas. L. Tiffany by Chas. Eichold and Edward Miller. The costs were incurred in the appeal by Mr. Tiffany to the General Term of the City Court, from a judgment against him on a balance due by B. C. Young & Co., St. Louis, whose account, the plaintiffs alleged, Mr. Tiffany had guaranteed. The judgment was recently affirmed by the General Term.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 14th July 1897

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Wed Jul 15, 2015 2:30 pm

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Tiffany & Co. - New York - 1907

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Thu Jul 16, 2015 8:21 am

Interesting Storage' Case Decided Against Tiffany & Co.

An interesting suit involving a novel point, was tried before Judge Barrett and a jury in the New York Supreme Court circuit Nov. 13th. It was the action brought by Mrs. Myrtella F. Hart, to recover from Tiffany & Co., the value of a trunk full of articles which she stored with Tiffany & Co., and which they afterward delivered to her husband, from whom she had separated. The trunk was sent to Tiffany's July I, 1891. The Harts were then living in New York. On the receipt given to Mrs. Hart for the trunk was a printed notice stating that the receipt must be given up before the trunk could be surrendered. Soon after the trunk was stored the Harts went to Charleston. From there Mr. Hart wrote to Tiffany & Co. for the trunk, and they sent it to him Feb. 9, 1892. In April, 1892, Mrs. Hart demanded the trunk and in reply Tiffany & Co. showed her her husband's receipt for it. She then brought this suit.

Mrs. Hart testified that she had letters in the trunk which she intended to use in an action for divorce against her husband. Fearing that he might try to get these letters, she says she wrote to Tiffany & Co. telling them not to give up the trunk to her husband. The firm denied receiving such a letter. She alleged that the contents of the trunk were worth $2,500, exclusive of the letters, consisting of silver, part of her trousseau, and point lace of much value.

Several experts, including employes of Tiffany & Co., testified as to the value of the contents of the trunk. The deposition of Hart, taken in Charleston, said that experts who had examined the contents of the trunk in Charleston had valued them at $427.75. He admitted having the trunk and said his wife had never demanded it of him.

The point was also raised, but without avail, that by the law of South Carolina wedding presents belong to the husband. Justice Barrett said that if a person can give to a husband what is confided to him by the wife, he can give it to any other relative or to a stranger. The jury found a verdict awarding Mrs. Hart $1,030, with interest, and an extra allowance of 5 per cent., making the verdict in all $1,199.50.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 21st November 1894

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sun Jul 19, 2015 12:31 pm

An illustration of the Tiffany & Co. pavilion at the World's Columbian Exposition of 1893:

Image

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Mon Jul 27, 2015 12:55 pm

THE GOELET CUP

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Last week the Gloriana, of the New York Yacht Club, was awarded a magnificent prize in the shape of the Goelet sloop cup for winning the race of the forty-six footers off Newport. The same craft won recently a beautiful silver trophy, which was duly illustrated on this page as a salient specimen of etched work on silver. The present piece combines decorations in chased, etched and applied work. It is a love cup oxidized, is fourteen inches high, and has two handles. Throughout, the cup is a decorative embodiment of the sea and its accompaniments, cleverly wrought into a harmonious design.

Under the rim, which is of waving outline, is the inscription "Goelet Cup, 1891, " in letters of almost wild design. The body is chased to resemble a great mass of turbulent water, swirling around it from foot to rim. In this water mermaids clad in robes of seaweed are represented as being carried around with the whirl. There are four of these mermaids.

Near the foot on either side two winged dolphins leap out of the water and touch at the neck of the cup, thus making a free outward curve. These dolphins form the handles. Upon their breasts are incrustations of shells, producing a highly marine effect. This peculiarity can be better seen when the piece is viewed from the side, as can also be seen the spirited swing upward of the leaping fish, which effect is lost in the front view. Around the foot of the cup, a decoration of entwined shells and seaweed is applied. In general outline, the cup is very attractive and original, the curves of the body being graceful and unconventional. The numerous details of the design are accurately reproduced from the conception of the original models, and are combined harmoniously. Altogether this production of silversmithing reflects credit upon its manufacturers, Tiffany & Co., New York, and will serve to maintain the high reputation this house has borne for years.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 19th August 1891

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Wed Jul 29, 2015 3:22 am

On Jan. 6th, Tiffany & Co.. advertised for a diamond pendant lost by a customer and offered $300 reward for its return. The ornament was found by Geo. A. Pughe. He took part of the diamond chain, which was broken in three pieces, to Jacob Lubliner, a secondhand jewelry dealer, at 32d St. and 7th Ave., who told him the stones were paste and gave him $100 for the piece. He pawned another piece for $2. The next day Pughe saw the advertisement and took the main piece of the pendant, which contained twenty stones, to Tiffany's, and received $200 reward. He told what he had done with the other pieces, and the one he had pawned was recovered without trouble. Lubiner, however, denied any knowledge of the jewelry, and said he had never seen Pughe. He was arrested, and in the Jefferson Market Police Court Wednesday was held in $1,000 bail for the Grand Jury.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 31st January 1894

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Wed Aug 05, 2015 6:27 am

The Duty on Enameled Paintings and the Drawback on Watchmen's Clocks

The Board of Classification of the United States General Appraisers handed down a decision recently overruling the protest of Tiffany & Co., and sustaining the decision of the Collector, on merchandise consisting in part of certain paintings enameled on metal. These goods were classified as manufactures of metal by the Collector, and dutiable at the rate of 45 per cent, ad valorem, under paragraph 193 of the Act of 1891.

The protestants claimed that they were dutiable at the rate of 20 per cent, ad valorem, under paragraph 454, as paintings in oil or water-colors. The testimony showed that the paintings were produced on a metal base by the use of pigments containing flux, and are different from those used in ordinary oil paintings, but are used for the production of enameled paintings.

The Board found that the process of firing required a high degree of heat to complete the enameling; and, following the decision of the United States Circuit Court in the case of Bour vs. the United States, found that the articles in question were not paintings in oil or water-colors.

According to the Board, they would have been more properly classified under paragraph 159 as "wares or articles of iron, steel or other metal enameled or glazed with vitreous gases." But as that claim was not made in the protest, the Board saw no reason for considering it.

Assistant Secretary Taylor, of the Treasury Department, has notified Collector of Customs at New York that the instructions establishing a rate for allowance of drawback on watchmen's clocks are extended to cover the same kind of articles manufactured by E. Imhauser & Co., of New York, the clocks as imported having been subjected to a final finishing process and having been supplied with the appliances required in order to complete their practical operation.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 27th August 1902

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Wed Aug 26, 2015 5:09 am

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Tiffany & Co. - New York - 1906

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sat Aug 29, 2015 2:33 pm

Tiffany & Co. are showing in their window at 15th St. and Union Square, the America Cup, the international yacht trophy that will again be raced for next month.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 20th September 1899

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sun Aug 30, 2015 12:02 pm

Slight damage was done to the silversmithing factory of Tiffany & Co., 47 Prince St., from a small fire which occurred Wednesday night. An overheated furnace set fire to the flooring of the cellar, but the burning wood was quickly discovered and the fire extinguished.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 3rd February 1897

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Tue Sep 01, 2015 10:50 am

A Study in Bronze Modeling

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The magnificent piece of bronze illustrated in this issue of The Circular forms the State prize that was won last summer by the sharpshooters of the 23d Regiment, N.Y.N.G. at Creedmoor. The group is a reproduction of the monument erected by the French Government to the memory of General Chanzy, at Chanzy Au Mans, France, in recognition of that brave soldier's services in defence of his country's honor, and it was imported into America by Tiffany &Co., New York. The title of the group is "The Defence of the Colors," and it vividly portrays one of the many exciting incidents of the battle-field.

From the position of the figures it would appear that the enemy is making a charge to capture the colors and that the trio have clustered together to defend them to the last. Braced against the shattered wheel of a dismantled gun stands the standard-bearer, holding in his hands the flag of his country, while his face silently speaks of his determination to die at his post if necessary. In front of him is an officer who has apparently galloped to his assistance but whose horse was shot from under him as he arrives. Undaunted, however, he is emptying his revolver as he lies half crushed under the animal. Behind him is another soldier, a private from the ranks, a man it would seem from his cool demeanor and seared countenance who had inhaled the smoke of many battles, and in this trying moment of peril, is pausing to make sure that every bullet sent from his gun shall find a resting-place in the body of one of the men in the advancing columns.

Each figure is a study in itself, and the effect of the group on the beholder is similar to that experienced when one's ear is greeted with the sound of martial music. A. Croisy has clearly delineated on the three faces expressions that carry one to scenes of bloodshed.

The group is about fourteen inches long and about twelve inches high, and is at present being exhibited in the show rooms of Tiffany & Co., where the photograph was taken especially to be reproduced in The Circular.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 21st October 1891

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