Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sat Jan 31, 2015 6:37 am

Theodore A. Austen, 67 years of age, and for 52 years in the employ of Tiffany & Co., jewelers, died at his home in Bay Ridge several days ago. Mr. Austen was an expert enameller of jewelry.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 19th November 1919

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Wed Feb 04, 2015 7:16 am

A PRINCE OF SILVERSMITHS

The late Edward C. Moore was easily the foremost silversmith in the United States. It is largely due to his skill and industry that American silverware has reached a degree of perfection that makes it celebrated all over the world. He practically developed a new industry here ; but modest and retiring, almost morbidly averse to publicity of any kind, he passed through life without assuming in the eyes of the general public the credit he so well deserved. In the words of his warm friend, Mr. S. P. Avery, the world will never fully know the loss it met with in the death of Mr. Moore, and what he did for the industrial arts will never be wholly told.

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He was a son of John C. Moore, who manufactured silverware for Marquand & Co., and also for their successors, Ball, Tompkins & Black. He learned his trade in his father's shop, and was later taken into partnership, finally succeeding his father upon the latter's retirement in 1851. Before this an arrangement had been effected to manufacture solely for Tiffany & Co., which was continued until 1868 when, Tiffany & Co. becoming a corporation under the State laws, they bought the entire plant of Mr. Moore, and thereafter the establishment was a department of their general business, under the direction of Mr. Moore as an officer of the company. Early in the sixties Mr. Moore saw the need of better artistic instructions, and, realizing the meagre facilities offered in this city, more particularly in the decorative and industrial arts, he set to work to establish a system of instruction and training in his Prince Street works that soon developed into the most thorough and complete school of its kind in existence. He travelled extensively abroad, and with Mr. G. F. T. Reed, the then resident partner at Paris of Tiffany & Co., made an especial study of the workings of the local technical schools supported by the city of Paris–not the Ecole des Beaux Arts. This system he introduced in his own works, and with it, drawing and modelling from natural objects became a part of the education of his apprentices. Constantly seeking to improve on old methods, silversmithing and metal-working were raised by him to such a standard that they graded insensibly into the fine arts.

Mr. Moore's great forte was form and utility rather than decoration. Utility always came first, then grace and appropriateness of form. In his travels he was quick to gather ideas from the methods of metal-workers in other countries. The Persian, North of India, and Oriental schools contributed to his knowledge, but his originality was shown by the fact that his observations and constant studies and researches were ever creating and developing something peculiarly his own. A notable instance was his famous " hammered silverware," first exhibited by the Tiffanys at the Paris Exposition of 1878. These wares were placed side by side with those of Elkington, Odiot, and Christofle; but by their originality of type, in method of application, and minuteness of every detail they created a perfect furor throughout Europe, and won the highest honors. Hammered silverware became the rage. The hammered surface was produced, as indicated, by hammering, the idea having evidently originated from the early method of hammering all metals into the desired form, and then removing as far as possible the marks of the hammer. Mr. Moore's unique idea was to show these blows just as made in all their severity. He embellished the general effect by oxidizing, and for decorative purposes introduced natural objects–such as insects, birds, fishes, flowers, and foliage. These were mounted on the silver and wrought in gold of different alloys, copper, and other metals.

The amalgamation of metals, which originated with the Japanese, was another of Mr. Moore's successful studies which he perfected to a great art. This consisted of several metallic compounds worked up mechanically together, yet each of them retaining its original purity. He produced some fine specimens of this work for the Paris Exposition of 1889, noticeably a beautiful vase, standing about three feet
high. His great work for this exposition, however, was Saracenic both in form and decoration. This Saracenic silverware, of which many exquisite specimens in vases, compoliers, coffee-pots, etc., are now on exhibition at Tiffany's, was the pride of his life, and to it he gave his undivided attention in preparation for the Exposition of 1889. The ware is Saracenic chiefly in the form. In the decorations Mr. Moore introduced many new features heretofore foreign to metalwork, notably the enamelling of orchids, which Mr. Paulding Farnham originated in his designs for the jewellery made by this same house for the exposition, and which was also rewarded with a gold medal.

Enamelling on metals was another one of Mr. Moore's favorite studies, his efforts being devoted to overcoming the glazy and glittering effects so common in Russian and Persian silverware. How well he succeeded may be seen on the beautiful work in the Saracenic ware. Orchids of many varieties are reproduced with true fidelity as to colors and every minute detail, from the stem to the tip of the leaves, in hard, dull enamels, and bear the imprint of the most marvellous delicacy and rare genius in their treatment. In some of the pieces the effect of the enamelling is enriched by pierced or open work, oxidizing or stone-finish, but all of them are enhanced by the finest of etched work.

Etching on metals was another distinct branch of the industry which Mr. Moore has developed, until to-day it is gradually supplanting engraving.

In 1867 Mr. Moore's work received its first medal at the Paris Exposition ; another medal followed it home from the Centennial in 1876; and then the honors came thick and fast. The house was appointed jewellers and silversmiths to Queen Victoria and other crowned heads. The silverware received the Grand Prix at the Paris Expositions in 1878 and 1889. When, at the 1878 exposition, Mr. Charles L. Tiffany, the head of the house, was decorated with the Legion of Honor, Mr. Moore received a special gold medal. At the exposition of 1889 he was titled Chevalier and decorated with the Legion of Honor.

Aside of his great interest and devotion to the industrial arts, Mr. Moore was a great collector of objects of art for his own home.


Source: The Illustrated American - 29th August 1891

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Tue Feb 10, 2015 7:35 am

WORLD'S FAIR - CHICAGO-1893

Disposition of the Jewelry Exhibits After the Fair

Chicago, Ill., Oct. 28.–The question of what would become of all the grand exhibits collected under the roof of the various great buildings is one that each visitor has many times asked himself during the closing week of the great Fair. Regret is everywhere heard that so marvelous a display of man's and woman's handiwork should pass into a mere matter of history and visionary plans for its perpetuation have crowded fast upon the minds of many. It is a pity to see the glorious spectacle pass from sight and more's the pity that concerted action can not be had looking toward the establishment of a permanent exhibit of the lines of manufacturing jewelers in New York city.

Tiffany & Co.:–Exhibit is to be shipped right on to New York by express. Quite a number of the larger pieces have been sold and will be delivered immediately, and the balance distributed throughout the New York stock. The friezes on the walls of the room, which are painted on canvas, the chandeliers, cases, and safes will be shipped east, with such other parts of the building as the expense of transportation will warrant.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 1st November 1893

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sun Feb 15, 2015 6:04 am

Tiffany & Co., of New York, have filed suit in the Circuit Court for $4,981 on book account against Charles Morgan, of Luddington Road. South Orange. The account was opened in Nov., 1919, and ran until Feb., 1920. Among the items listed in the account was the following, purchased on Christmas Eve, 1919: Diamond bracelet, $3,525; vanity case, $625; and two vases, $12. It was stated at his home when the papers were filed that Mr. Morgan was on a shooting trip in Georgia.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 30th November 1921

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Tue Mar 17, 2015 8:22 am

The Baker Social Service Cup


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The Baker Cup, as illustrated, is of sterling silver, weighing six and a half pounds, standing 12 inches high, 12 inches across the bowl and 19 inches from handle to handle. Tiffany & Company of New York City made the cup from a design evolved especially for Secretary of War Baker, and the lettering and other details were worked out by Brother Baker. Around the outside of the howl runs the following inscription, originated by Brother Baker: "True Education Discloses and Develops our Capacities for Service." The inside rim of the bowl carries the following: "The Newton D. Baker Social Service Cup, Presented 1916 by Thomas J. Howells, Awarded Annually to the Chapter of Phi Gamma Delta which has Excelled in Religious, Ethical and Social Service Activities." The cup is beautifully figured and in the bottom of the bowl has the fraternity's coat-of-arms. It is proposed to inscribe in the bowl the names of the chapters holding it. All who have seen the cup have pronounced it a wonderfully fine specimen of the silversmith's art.

Source: The Phi Gamma Delta - October 1916

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Tue Mar 24, 2015 8:37 am

A new firm in the silverware business is E. Newton & Co., 60 Arlington street. Newark. N. J. The firm is composed of father and son, the senior, Edward Newton. who has been in the silver business for a number of years, being formerly connected with Tiffany & Co., having had charge of several departments including that of assaying and refining. The junior member of the firm, Edward E. Newton, has been with the Gorham Manufacturing Company for 10 years and was in charge of their electro plating department. Both men are thoroughly familiar with the business and make sterling silverware, do repairing, silver plating. gilding and refinishing. One of their specialties: is hotel and club work. Edward E. Newton also gives expert advice on plating and silversmithing.

Source: The Metal Industry - October 1906

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Fri Mar 27, 2015 3:25 pm

Geo. F. Kunz, of Tiffany & Co.. has been asked to serve on the jury of awards in the mines section of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition. Mr. Kunz will be forced to decline through the press of his business engagements during the time this jury sit—Oct. 12 to 18.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 5th October 1898

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Wed Apr 08, 2015 4:20 am

Tiffany & Co. are the makers of the Kemp Cup, one of the principal prizes at the parade of wheelmen in fancy and burlesque costume, held on the Rumson Road, Seabright, N. J., Saturday, under the auspices of the Red Bank (N. J.) Wheelmen.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 20th September 1899

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Tue Apr 14, 2015 5:17 am

The Gorham Mfg. Co., Tiffany & Co. and the Tiffany Art Glass Co. have just made a joint contract with Tracy Brothers, builders, Waterbury, to erect an exhibition building at Chicago inside of the Manufactures Building. The building is to be about 55 by 250, one story high, of a very artistic design, and will cost about $25,000.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 1st February 1893

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Wed Apr 15, 2015 2:10 pm

Lectures to be Delivered by George F. Kunz

George F. Kunz, the gem expert, has arranged to give the following lectures:

"Geography as influenced by Precious Stones," at Girard College, Philadelphia, Pa., April 8, at 7:30 P.M.
"Geography as influenced by Precious Stones," at the Franklin Institute, Philadelphia, Pa., on April 9, at 7:30 P.M.
"On the Engraving of Hard and Gem Stones," National Sculpture Society, Fine Arts Gallery, 17th St., near Broadway, New York, April 13, at 8 P.M.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 7th April 1897

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Thu Apr 16, 2015 7:20 am

The building at Broadway and Fifteenth street, New York City, which has been occupied by Messrs. Tiffany & Co., jewelers and silversmiths since 1868, was recently sold for $2,000,000. Tiffany & Co. are now occupying their new building on Fifth avenue. This firm carries on its manufacturing at Forest Hill. Newark, N. J.

Source: The Brass World and Platers' Guide - December 1905

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Fri Apr 17, 2015 4:48 am

The Silversmiths' Strike

An Adjustment To Be Reached Ere Long


New York - June 3 - The state board of arbitrators concluded their examination into the silversmiths' troubles this afternoon. Mr. E.C. Moore of Tiffany & Co., and T. Wood of Wood & Hughes testified to the effect that the employers had organised to wage war on the Knights of Labor. Counsel agreed that the argument was not necessary and Chairman Purcell stated that the board were desirous of having a private conference with committees representing both sides. It is believed that an adjustment of the difficulty may be reached before too long.

Source: Meriden Daily Republican - 3rd June 1887

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Fri Apr 24, 2015 3:03 pm

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Probably no piece of silverware produced in recent years has told the story of an epoch in history more beautifully or more interestingly traced the events associated with the subject as the massive punch bowl executed by Tiffany & Co. for the Society of Colonial Wars. The story of the colonial wars and the spirited scenes of the period in which they occurred are graphically pictured in bas-relief, repousse and etched work artistically introduced upon the body and foot of the bowl. The wavy effect of the border around the top also comes into play in a modified form as a back ground for the artist's decorations, and the raised lettering is in the same effect. The two figures conspicuous in the picture, in a kneeling position at the base of the bowl, are a North American Indian and an old colonial soldier. They are both historically correctly attired and equipped, the Indian with his tomahawk, and the colonial soldier with his blunderbuss.

Around the body of the bowl are the arms of the nine original colonies, Virginia, Massachusetts, New York, New Hampshire, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Maryland, New Jersey and Pennsylvania, exactly as they appeared on the shields. There are also two animated scenes etched on the bowl. One pictures a three masted boat sailing into the harbor along the Massachusetts coast, and the rather warm reception which the new arrivals received at the hands of the native Indians who greeted the intruders with a shower of arrows. The other etching is a battle scene in the colonial days, between the Puritans and the Indians in the northern part of Massachusetts. On the opposite side of these etchings, or front of the bowl, is the following inscription in wavy letters: Society of Colonial Wars in the State of New York, 1607-1775.

Not the least interesting feature of this bowl, is the remarkable collection of genuine old colonial silver coins, obtained after much difficulty and at great cost. There are twenty-four of these; twenty-three silver ones are on the bowl, and one gold one is in the bowl of the ladle. To collectors and numismatists these will have a special interest, as the collection contains specimens of most of the English, Dutch, and Spanish coins that circulated in the colonies from Henry VIII. in 1509 down to George III. in 1760. These have been mounted on the bowl, apparently scattered over it but yet in a chronological order, as follows:

One silver groat, Henry VII., 1509.
One silver coin, Philip and Mary, 1554-1558.
One sixpence, Elizabeth, 1558-1603.
One silver shilling, Elizabeth, 1558-1603.
One silver coin, Philip II., of Spain, 1566.
One silver shilling, James I. 1603-1625.
One silver shilling, Charles I., 1625-1649.
One silver sixpence, Commonwealth, 1652.
Three Pinetree shillings (Massachusetts), 1652.
One silver shilling, Cromwell, 1658.
One silver shilling Commonwealth, 1660.
One silver shilling, Charles II., 1678.
One silver shilling, James II., 1685.
One silver crown, William and Mary 1699.
One silver shilling William III., 1699.
One silver Spanish shilling, Charles III., 1708.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 6th December 1893

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sun Apr 26, 2015 8:09 am

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Tiffany & Co. - New York - 1917

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Tue Apr 28, 2015 3:23 am

FRANCIS A. DILK

Obituaries

Francis A. Dilk, 75, 1028, Myrtle Ave., Venice, died Tuesday at Venice Hospital. He was born in Elizabeth, N.J., and came to this area from Leonardo, N.J. in 1961.

He was a retired silversmith from Tiffany & Co., retiring after 42 years service. He was a member of St. Marks Episcopal Church of Venice.

He leaves a widow, Clarice H. and several nieces and nephews.

Funeral services will be held at Rawles Furneral Home Chapel in Venice at 11 a.m. Friday with the Rev. Donis Dean Patterson officiating.

Burial will be in Sarasotsa Memorial Park.


Source: Sarasota Journal - 19th November 1969

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Fri May 08, 2015 4:19 am

Tiffany & Co. have entered a judgment for $104.72 against John T. Little, Jr.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 3rd September 1902

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Wed May 20, 2015 3:32 am

Tiffany & Co. last week completed the elaborate album which contains the address to Queen Victoria from the members of the St..George Society in New York. The album is of morocco, embossed with the Imperial crown. It contains 20 vellum pages, two of which are devoted to a handsomely illuminated address to the Queen. The succeeding pages bear a list of the officers and members of the society. On the page of signatures are depicted various views of New York done in water colors.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 16th June 1897

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Wed May 27, 2015 7:18 am

Tiffany's Horse Show

Tiffany's windows, on Union Square, New York, always attract attention. The firm are not given to lavish displays of any kind, but they are students of contemporary events and their exhibits usually possess some special element of interest to the public. Last week, during the much discussed "Portrait Exhibit," fashionable shoppers stood several rows deep in front of Tiffany's window, anxious to get a glimpse of a famous miniature, over 300 years old, of Mary, Queen of Scots, and this week their " Horse Show" window is the subject of many flattering compliments.

The present display, while thoroughly "horsey," bears that elegant touch of refinement so characteristic of the house. The articles shown represent a wide variety of the firm's products of interest in connection with the Horse Show. There are hand painted menus, with hunt scenes; bronze hackneys and other horses, for cabinets, etc.; riding crops, whips, silver spurs and stirrups, dashboard watches, fans with painted scenes of coaching parties, etc.; boot-pulls and novelties in gold and silver jewelry with horsey designs, etc.

Tiffany & Co. rank among the oldest and most conservative houses in America, and one of the secrets of their continued success is that they keep abreast of the times in their advertisements as well as the general management of their business.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 21st November 1894

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Fri Jun 05, 2015 8:48 am

Image
Tiffany & Co. - New York - 1907

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Tue Jun 09, 2015 6:36 am

Mrs. Charles B. Stockwell Robbed of a Large Quantity of Jewelry

A despatch from London published in yesterday's papers announced that Mrs. Marie Louise Stockwell, widow of Chas. B. Stockwell, who was a member of the firm of Tiffany & Co., New York, had been robbed of jewels valued at $50,000. The despatch said that the robbery took place on Sunday, at the Savoy Hotel, London, where the room of Mrs. Stockwell was entered. It is understood that the burglar or burglars obtained jewelry valued at £10,000 ($50,000), and bank notes and other negotiable currency to the amount of £5,000 ($25,000).

Mrs. Stockwell and her nephew had been guests at the hotel for some weeks. The apartment was entered while they were at dinner. On returning to her room Mrs. Stockwell found the door locked on the inside. The hotel detective forced the door. The room had been thoroughly ransacked. The manager of the hotel closed all the doors of the building, summoned detectives, and searched all strangers and servants. Nothing, however, was recovered. The thief or thieves had escaped.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 25th October 1899

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