Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Wed Nov 05, 2014 5:01 am

At the request of Tiffany & Co., New York, John Vitale, proprietor of the Tiffany Mfg. Co., 9 Calendar St., this city, has changed the name of the concern to the Highpoint Ring Co.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 11th August 1920

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Thu Nov 06, 2014 1:04 pm

To the Editor of The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith

Mr. G. F. Kunz, of the firm of Tiffany & Co., New York, writes:–I notice on page 15, July number, you say–"A geologist who can discover the real matrix of the ruby and sapphire, will no longer need to write pamphlets or read lectures in order to gain an income, but will soon be heard of in financial circles as the 'Jewel King.'" Permit me to say that Col. C. W. Jencks, of Boston, found, over ten years ago, while carrying on systematic mining for corundum at Jenck's corundum mine, Franklin, Macon Co., North Carolina, not only sapphires and rubies, but also the finest Oriental emerald (corundum) ever found. This specimen is in the collection of Mr. Clarence S. Bement, of Philadelphia. The gems were very few and far between, so that, although he found the matrix, the mine has only been a success as an emery or corundum mine, and not as a gem mine.


Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - October 1886

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Fri Nov 07, 2014 4:42 am

Tiffany & Co. are showing at their store, a magnificent collection of old India jewelry carefully selected after many months' researches in the principal cities of the East. The collection forms one of the most interesting exhibits they have ever gathered abroad, as it represents the higher class of early gold and silver work made in the East, among which are enamels from Jeypore and gold ornaments from Rajputana, Punjab, and the Madras country.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 29th November 1893

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sat Nov 08, 2014 4:52 am

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Tiffany & Co. - New York - 1874

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Tue Nov 11, 2014 1:02 pm

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Tiffany & Co. - New York - 1900

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Thu Nov 13, 2014 12:41 pm

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Tiffany & Co. - New York - 1872

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Fri Nov 14, 2014 7:07 am

Tiffany & Co. are offered a $300 reward for a pear-shaped diamond in a light gold setting with a small hook at the back. It was lost about three weeks ago. They also offer $20 for the return of a gold enamelled butterfly brooch, set with three rose diamond, which was lost Oct. 29 on Fifth Ave. between 29th and 30th Sts.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 7th November 1894

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sun Nov 23, 2014 7:27 am

A GOOD STORY "KILLED"

Necklace Yarn Breaks Into Print Again and Is Denied by Wireless from Paris and by American Gem Expert

Last week New York newspapers published stories about the "theft" of a valuable necklace from the Louvre Museum in Paris. The necklace was said to be one which Napoleon Bonaparte had given to Josephine. The story said that Tiffany & Co. was about to restore the necklace to the French Museum after it had finally come into the possession of that concern. The story was a myth and one which has often been published with variations.

The story told of a "love collar" given by Napoleon to Josephine which was stolen from the Louvre 25 years ago. The French Chamber of Deputies had offered a reward of $150,000 and French detectives had scoured the country to locate it. It had been purchased for a meagre $25 by two Americans in the Chinese quarters in San Francisco and finally turned over to Tiffany & Co., New York, for 85,000 francs. The Tiffany concern, so the story related, was preparing to return the necklace to the French Government.

A dispatch from Paris, France, last Thursday, stated that in the first place the Louvre never had such a collar in its possession: secondly the Chamber of Deputies never offered any reward for it, and, thirdly, the French police, French officials and French experts never heard of such a necklace.

On Thursday the New York 'Times' published a wireless from the. French capital reporting the story, a part of which reads as follows:

The 'Figaro' today says the tale is one of the prettiest it has ever heard, but adds:

"However, neither French antiquaries, nor the French police, nor the French newspapers have any information about this famous collar, so well described from America. We have interrogated at least twenty persons–police officials, directors of our museums and experts on Napoleonic memoirs. Not one of them ever heard of this famous robbery from the Louvre. We went through all the newspaper files for twentyfive years and had no better luck. We do not say that Napoleon never gave Josephine the necklace, but they know more about it in America than we do in France."

The 'Matin' sent a representative to see M. Mignon, director of the Louvre, who said he had never heard of the amber necklace, and certainly it was never in the Louvre. After a search of the records of the Chamber of Deputies the 'Matin' says that no reward was ever offered for the recovery of Josephine's collar.

'Excelsior''s investigation took its reporter to see Henri Verne of the staff of the National Museums, who said:

"Josephine's collar was never stolen from the Louvre for the good reason that it was never there. Nor in our archives is there any mention of any such piece. I do not say it does not exist, but we know nothing about it.", .

Jean Bourguignon, custodian of Josephine's home at Malmaison, was also without knowledge of the necklace.

"This necklace story looks like a canard," he said.

'Excelsior' asked for information from the Paris branch of Tiffany's, but could get no news of the restoration to the Louvre of an amber necklace which it had never lost.

Dr. George F. Kunz, of Tiffany & Co., New York, when interviewed by a 'Jewelers' Circular' reporter, branded the whole affair as a myth.

"This story is an ancient one which was originated about four years ago," he said.

"The first time this tale was told in the newspapers, a school teacher, supposed to come from New York or Mount Vernon, was touring Europe and at Florence, Italy, picked up a necklace which she supposed was hematite. The necklace, of course, so the story went, was bought at a ridiculously low price and brought back to New York. When shown to Tiffany & Co., the newspapers reported at the time, the necklace was found to contain black pearls of a rare variety and worth a fortune. Of course, the teacher 'cashed in' on the necklace, but in the newspapers only, for the entire story was a myth.

"The next time the story was told the circumstances surrounding its purchase were somewhat similar to the first incident. A teacher, apparently the same one, was again the purchaser of a cameo necklace, believed to be only an ordinary piece of jewelry, for a mere pittance. Again the teacher was supposed to have brought the necklace to Tiffany & Co., where, to her great surprise, it was discovered to contain cameos at one time belonging to Queen Marie Antoinette, of France, and given to her by the crowned heads of Europe. Again the story went up in smoke.

"The newspapers publish this story periodically and then after its publication endeavor to verify it. I have been taken aside by newspaper men at banquets and asked about this story but each time I have told them it is all a myth."


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 22nd June 1921

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Wed Nov 26, 2014 6:16 am

Mrs. Mary Smith Wood, widow of Robert Walker Kay Wood, who before his death 34 years ago was a steel and copper engraver for Tiffany & Co., died at her home, 343 Hancock St., Brooklyn, last Friday, April 27- Mrs. Wood was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, 72 years ago and resided in Brooklyn for half a century.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 2nd May 1917

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sat Nov 29, 2014 5:30 am

Papers for change of name were filed in the County Clerk's office a few days ago for the Tiffany Never-Wind Clock Co., to be changed to the Cloister Clock Corp. The firm is located at 2964 Main St. George P. Warner is the president and James Van Inwager, Jr., is secretary.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 23rd August 1922

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Wed Dec 10, 2014 7:58 am

Louis Tiffany, of the well known firm of Tiffany & Co., is critically ill at his home, Madison avenue and Seventy-second street, from an attack of the grip.

Source: The Jewelers' Review - 3rd May 1899

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Thu Dec 11, 2014 6:50 am

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Lebar Jewelers - Sarasota - 1965

Lebar Jewelers, the business of Sidney Lebar, were one of the only two appointed Tiffany representatives in Florida in the early 1960's. The Lebar shop in Sarasota, and another in Fort Myers, was acquired from Golf Jewelers in spring of 1950. The business traded under the name Rich—Lebar Jewelers before later becoming Lebar Jewelers. The manager of the Sarasota store in 1960 was noted as William Munroe.

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Fri Dec 12, 2014 12:19 pm

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Tiffany & Co. - New York - 1909

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sun Dec 21, 2014 4:53 pm

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Frank C. Osmers - New York - 1922

Frank C. Osmers was formerly employed at Tiffany's Union Square premises.

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Wed Dec 24, 2014 6:15 am

The Lake Mohegan estate of Dr. George F. Kunz, of Tiffany & Co., was enlarged last week, when this well-known gem expert purchased 26 acres of ground, with 1,000 feet of lake frontage, from Mrs. Jennie Beach Gasper. Dr. Kunz's purchase enlarges his already extensive holdings on Lake Mohegan to 150 acres. The property is all high land with an extensive view over the lake.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 28th June 1922

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Fri Dec 26, 2014 5:34 am

Tiffany & Co. flung to the breeze in front of the beautiful building at 37th St. and Fifth Ave., Friday last, a service flag of which they and the jewelry trade can be justly proud. The flag contains 81 stars, indicating the number of men that went from their establishment to join the colors of the United States in the army and navy.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 31st October 1917

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sat Dec 27, 2014 12:59 pm

The cornerstone of the new building of Tiffany & Co., at Fifth Avenue and Thirty-seventh Street was laid on March 29 in the presence of the trustees of the company, viz.: Charles T. Cook, Paulding Farnham, George F. Kunz, Louis C. Tiffany, John C. Moore, Charles L. Tiffany Jr., Charles M. Moore, Alfred Mitchell and Harry Treadwell. Among the articles placed in the cornerstone was a piece of the first Atlantic cable laid in 1858.

Source: Metal Industry - April 1904

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Mon Dec 29, 2014 9:22 am

The Tiffany Furnaces, 51 Newark St., Hoboken, has amended its charter in the office of the Secretary of State by changing its name to Louis C. Tiffany Furnaces, Inc., and changing the location of its principal office in New Jersey to Jersey City. The company also has an office at Corona, N. Y. Its capitalization is $40,000, composed of 400 shares at $100 each. Four thousand dollars is devoted to the starting of business by the concern.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 19th January 1921

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Tue Jan 06, 2015 6:00 am

A large collection of interesting books written by Dr. George F. Kunz, gem expert of Tiffany & Co., was the center of attraction at an exhibition held at the Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation Gallery, 65 E. 56th St. This exhibition opened on Jan. 6 and came to a close last Saturday afternoon. The books written by Dr. Kunz were on display in two cases near the entrance to the gallery and attracted considerable attention. Among the books displayed was one, "The Book of the Pearl," written by Dr. Kunz in 1908 in which is shown the history, art, science and industry of the Queen of Gems. Another volume was the "Curious Lore of Precious Stones." This was written by the eminent gem expert in 1913 and embraces a description of the sentiment of precious stones and folk lore, superstitions and other interesting information. "Rings" is the title of another book exhibited at the gallery. This describes rings from the earliest known times to the present day with a full description of the origin and history and the many symbols expressed by rings. It was written in 1917. Another large volume in this same case is entitled, "Ivory and the Elephant." "Shakespeare and Precious Stones" was the title of another book shown. It treats on the references to precious stones in Shakespeare's works This volume also contained comments as to the origin of Shakespeare's material, the knowledge of the poet concerning precious stones and references as to where the precious stones of his time came from. This book was written by Dr. Kunz in 1916. The only other two volumes displayed in this case were "The Magic of Jewel Charms" written in 1915, and "Natal Stones," a volume dealing with the sentiments and superstitions associated with precious stones. In the same case also was shown a number of photographs and descriptions of a gem known as Kunzitc. In the other case. Dr. Kunz displayed a large number of books dealing with many different subjects. The principal volume shown in this case was the one entitled "Gems and Precious Stones of North America." It contained a description of their occurrence, value, history, etc., and also a chapter on pearls and on the remarkable foreign gems owned in the United States. Another volume featured early artistic watches, while several books described the precious stones of California and the gems of North Carolina. There were numerous catalogs and books on gems of all description too numerous to enumerate.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 1st February 1922

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Wed Jan 28, 2015 7:16 am

The hide of the giant elephant Forepaugh, who had a record of killing ten men, and whom it was found necessary to strangle to death, by reason of his vicious habits, is now exposed in Tiffany's window. Union Square, New York. It has been tanned and cleaned in Philadelphia, and will be made up by this enterprising concern into pocket-books and valises. Curiosity hunters have, therefore, something to look forward to when these articles are manufactured.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 2nd September 1889

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