Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Wed Jul 09, 2014 4:25 am

Charles L. Tiffany Sued for $10,000 for Libel

Judge Beach, in the New York Supreme Court, Friday, heard a motion for a bill of particulars made by Ten Eyck & Remington, attorneys for the defendant, in the suit brought by T. Wain Morgan Draper against Chas. L. Tiffany to recover $10,000 damages for alleged libel.

Mr. Draper, who is a genealogist of considerable experience, alleges in his complaint that he was employed by Mr. Tiffany to compile " The Genealogy and History of the Tiffany Family in America." Mr. Tiffany sent out a circular stating that he had decided not to publish the work as the compilation had not been made in a satisfactory manner. He cautioned everybody not to make advance payments for the book and said he would have nothing to do with the publication.

Mr. Draper asserts that this circular was libelous and damaged his business to the extent of $10,000. Mr.Tiffany's lawyers wish him to give particulars of the alleged damages. After hearing the plaintiff's attorneys, Warner & Crawford, in opposition to the motion for a bill of particulars, Judge Beach reserved his decision.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 6th December 1893

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Wed Jul 09, 2014 4:37 am

$1,000 Reward Offered by Tiffany & Co.

The following advertisement appeared in the New York newspapers on Tuesday morning:

$1,000 REWARD for the return of a small Tiffany & Co. paper box containing a fine white diamond bar pin with three diamond pendants, centre diamond weighing 4½ karats and other two 2½ karats each; one pair diamond top and drop earrings; nine stone diamond cluster ring; two solitaire diamond rings, one 2¼ karats, the other 1½ karats. Lost in or near a safe deposit company's offices, between Oct. 1, 1892, and July 15, 1893. TIFFANY & CO., Union Square.

The described diamond ornaments were lost in or near a safe deposit company's offices between Oct. 1, 1892, and July 15 of this year.

On the first-named date the owners of the lost articles overhauled some papers in their safe deposit box. The jewels were then in a white pasteboard box in the safe deposit box, and the owners say they went away leaving them there. Last July they paid another visit to the box and the jewels were gone.

The case was reported to the police, and the safe deposit company also hired men to work on it. No clue has been found. Tiffany & Co. say that the jewels can readily be recognized if offered for sale. The firm would not give the name of the safe deposit company, lest unwarranted blame should be thrown upon them. The owners of the jewels do not wish to be known.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 6th December 1893

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Fri Jul 18, 2014 5:31 am

Image
Tiffany & Co. - New York - 1910

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sat Jul 19, 2014 6:14 am

Of Interest to Columbian Souvenir Manufacturers

Geo. F. Kunz, gem expert for Tiffany & Co., New York, has been called upon to prepare a paper on the medallic history of the World's Columbian Exposition. He is now collecting copies of all medals or badges struck in commemoration of all events connected with the Exposition.

If manufacturers send copies to Mr. Kunz, care of Mines and Mining Deptartment, Jackson Park, Chicago, 111., until Nov. 1st, and after that date, care of Tiffany & Co., Union Square, New York, together with the facts stating why they were struck, whom they were cut by and other points of interest in connection with them, due credit will be given by the Society.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 18th October 1893

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sun Aug 03, 2014 6:44 am

Eighteen years ago. while prospecting along the Moroni river, that separates Dutch from French Guinea, Perry Tiffany discovered a large deposit of gold. Recently Mr. Tiffany, who is a member of the diamond merchant family, left at the head of an expedition to obtain this wealth. The deposit, which is believed to be worth many millions, is about 200 miles inland. Because of the light depth of the river, the party will travel the last part of the distance on a discarded submarine.

Source: The Trader & Canadian Jeweller - July 1920

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Thu Aug 21, 2014 4:10 am

New York

Tiffany & Co., of this city, announced last week that they brought suit against the Tiffany Never-Wind Clock Corpn., of Buffalo, manufacturers of the Tiffany Never-Wind clock. The basis of the complaint is an allegation of infringement of the trade-marks of Tiffany & Co.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 30th November 1921

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sat Aug 30, 2014 6:49 am

An image of Tiffany's display at the International Exhibition of Modern Decorative Art which was held at Turin in 1902:

Image

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Fri Sep 05, 2014 6:14 am

MISS KUNZ KILLED

Daughter and Secretary of Eminent Scientist and Gem Expert Meet Death in Accident Due to Runaway Horse

Thousands of friends and admirers throughout this country and Europe of Dr. George F. Kunz, the eminent gem expert, mineralogist and a vice-president of Tiffany & Co., have been expressing their deep sympathy for him in his bereavement due to the tragic death of his daughter, which occurred Monday. Miss Kunz was instantly killed in an accident due to a runaway horse near Lake Oscawana, about nine miles from Peekskill, N. Y., and at the same time Miss Paul Pryibel, private secretary of Dr. Kunz, suffered injuries from which she died in a hospital the same night. Miss Jane Kinsey, a research worker, who was also a member of the party, and a Miss Donahue were in the carriage at the time. Miss Kinsey suffered internal injuries of a serious nature and Miss Donahue suffered minor hurts. When the accident occurred, Dr. Kunz was attending the Tercentenary of the Landing of the Pilgrims at Massachusetts, being a member of President Harding's party.

Miss Kunz and her friends were passing a few days at Dr. Kunz's home at "Shrub Oaks." The four young women after lunch had taken a spirited horse which Miss Kunz had purchased a few weeks before and started in a surrey on a trip into the country, leaving the house about 2 P. M. Nothing was heard of Miss Kunz and her companions until about 8 o'clock Monday night, when three automobiles drew up to Dr. Kunz's home with the three other women and the body of Miss Kunz. Miss Pryibel and Miss Kinsey were unconscious and Miss Donahue was hysterical.

A hurry call was sent to the Peekskill Hospital, and on the arrival of Dr. Holla he said that Miss Kunz had been instantly killed when the horse crushed her skull, and that Miss Pryibel and Miss Kinsey were in a serious condition. Miss Pryibel and Miss Kinsey were hurried to the hospital, where Drs. Knight and Hart of the hospital staff joined Dr. Holla in an operation on Miss Pryibel in an attempt to save her life. The young woman died, however, at 10 o'clock tonight.
The physicians declared that she had suffered internal injuries when the horse stepped on her, and that Miss Kinsey's injuries might prove fatal.

After the others had been taken to the hospital, some meagre details of the accident were obtained from Miss Donahue. She said that about three miles north of Shrub Oaks they had turned into a narrow country road and the horse became frightened, and though Miss Kunz was an expert horsewoman, she was unable to control him after a sudden lurch had sent the surrey into a gulley and it had overturned, throwing out the occupants. Even then Miss Kunz held firmly to the reins to prevent the animal from running away. But the frightened steed suddenly backed up on her, as well as Miss Pryibel and Miss Kinsey, who had been stunned by the impact of the vehicle on them when it overturned. The horse, said Miss Donahue, backed on the three women and pranced on them for several minutes. She was able to get out of the way of his hoofs but the others were not. The reins had become entangled in the body of the three and the frightened animal dragged them for a hundred feet before it broke away.

Miss Donahue ran for help and met two parties of automobilists who had seen the horse dashing away and who hurried to the scene of the accident These and others carried the young women to Dr. Kunz's home at "Shrub Oaks" and later took the injured to the hospital.

Dr. Kunz, who holds degrees in several universities for his work in mineralogy and other sciences, is one of the most eminent gem experts in the world, the author of the most famous text books on this and collateral subjects and for many years was the United States Government's expert on precious stones. He is also president of a large number of scientific and historical associations and has thousands of friends in every walk of life, whose hearts go out to him in his latest loss. Dr. Kunz's son, George H., died Nov. 15, 1907, and his wife died Jan. 8, 1911. He has still one married daughter, Mrs. Zinffer, who is in Europe.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 3rd August 1921

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Tue Sep 09, 2014 3:48 am

Tiffany & Co. Institute Suit in San Franciscoto Recover $80,350 - Price of Pearl Necklace Sold in London

San Francisco, Cal., July 26.–Tiffany & Co., New York and London, have begun suit in the Superior Court here, to recover the price of a pearl necklace, purchased in their London store on June 3, 1920, by Sadie Wirt Spreckels, wife of the wealthy young clubman, John D. Spreckels, Jr., since deceased. Spreckels was a grandson of the late Claus Spreckels, "Sugar King" and multi-millionaire, of San Francisco.

Soon after the necklace was purchased, it was the object of a police search. Mrs. Spreckels, while in London, reported that she had given the pearls to Captain John Barrett, American army officer of Los Angeles, to be cleaned. She alleged that they had not been returned to her. Since that time a few of the pearls have been found in shops in England. Spreckels was killed in an automobile accident near Bakersfield, Cal., without, it is stated, having paid for the pearls.

In the complaint, which was filed by Knight, Boland, Hutchinson, and Christin, there is embodied a copy of an agreement, signed by Spreckels, it is alleged, in London, on Sept. 20, 1920, in which he agreed to pay the $80,350, if his wife did not. If he had to pay, the agreement was that he should be given complete custody of their little daughter, Geraldine.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 2nd August 1922

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Fri Sep 19, 2014 2:45 pm

Image
Tiffany & Co. - New York - 1900

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Wed Sep 24, 2014 10:09 am

A necklace of pearls to the value of over £12,000 has lately been sold by Messrs. Tiffany & Co., of New York. Few people realize how valuable pearls may be when well matched, and it must have taken many years of patient collecting to have got such pearls together.

Source: The Jeweller and Metalworker - 1st November 1885

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sat Oct 04, 2014 6:30 am

Chas. L. Tiffany Receives Congratulations on His 82d Birthday

Wednesday, Feb. 15, was the eighty-second birthday of Chas. L. Tiffany, the founder of Tiffany & Co., New York, and during the whole day an endless stream of visitors poured into his office bearing messages of good-will and hearty congratulations. An hour before Mr. Tiffany arrived, floral tokens began to accumulate on his desk, and when he himself stepped in shortly after 9 o'clock, his office was soon turned into a general reception-room and business was for a time suspended.

Chas. L. Tiffany, was born in Killingly, Conn., Feb. 15, 1812. He is thus 81 years of age but looks and feels no older than sixty years. In person Mr. Tiffany is of medium height, and of lithe and agile frame. He attends 'to business every day of his life, excepting a short rest in Summer and a brief fishing trip in the Fall.

He is a fellow of the Geographical Society, a trustee of the American Museum of Natural History and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, a member of the New York Historical Society, the Chamber of Commerce, the Union Club, the New York Club, New York Yacht Club, Jockey Club, South Side Club, West Island Club, Young Men's Christian Association, and other societies and institutions.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 22nd February 1893

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sun Oct 12, 2014 6:11 am

The "Gladstone Testimonial," a large ornament containing 1,000 ounces of pure silver, is now on exhibition at Tiffany's. This magnificent and costly work of art is the gift of many of Mr. Gladstone's admirers in America. It stands 36 inches high, with a width of 22 inches at the base. The testimonial is crowned with a small bust of Gladstone. The pose of the head is majestic, the face is stern yet of pleasant expression, and the design is correct. Immediately below the bust is a pedestal with the inscription, " William Ewart Gladstone, Testimonial Presented by his American Admirers." This is in fancy letters with raised surface and a fancy scroll-work background. In the centre of this part of the pedestal is a laurel wreath surrounding facies and scales of justice, with the words " Home Rule " in prominent letters. On the right side of this pedestal, and standing on the main pedestal, is a female form clothed in a light garment covered with stars. She holds in her left hand an Irish harp, and with her right arm lovingly clasped about the base of the bust, she looks up at the form of Gladstone with a face fixed with deep admiration. She represents the American admirers, and they are beautifully represented. Upon the other side of this pedestal is a large wreath of laurels, and on the back the date of presentation, 1887, is done in a richly ornamented style. Below this pedestal is the base. This is a large oblong block resting upon six feet of Celtic pattern. Its panels are ornamented with emblems. In the centre is represented the "lamp of learning," with the word " Sapientia " in block letters. Over this is the coat-of-arms of Christ Church College, with the words " Double First," which means to the men of this college that he took the first place both in mathematics and classics. To the right of this central group is a wreath with the emblem of justice, and to the left is a similar wreath with the emblem of kind-heartedness. The head of Homer in relief on the left side of the base indicates the classical learning of Gladstone, and that of Demosthenes upon the other indicates his great power as an orator. Shamrocks and stars and stripes are patterned into this testimonial with great skill and artistic effect. The whole piece, which is made solid and of pure silver, is a remarkable example of workmanship, and a work of art that does credit to all concerned in its construction.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st July 1887

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sat Oct 18, 2014 6:39 am

Messrs. Tiffany & Co.'s Exhibit for the Paris Exhibition

It is the universal opinion of experts, says the New York Jewelers' Circular, that the exhibit of jewels prepared by Messrs. Tiffany &. Co., especially for the Paris Exposition, and recently placed on view in this city, represents the highest attainment of the jeweller's art in America. The collection, which is valued at 500,000 dols., is the result of several years of patient thought and study. The object of the designers, according to the plan that had been adopted, was, as far as possible, to utilise the rude, yet characteristic Indian and aboriginal forms, and the best of later American models, also employing American gems largely in the decoration. The result of all this painstaking labour is simply bewildering to the beholder. It reflects the highest credit on the heads of the house of Tiffany & Co., heads on which, to be sure, high honours rest easily, and warrants the belief that in making this exhibit they were actuated, not so much by the desire of selfaggrandisement as by a patriotic determination to put the American jeweller in the foreground at Paris among all the competing nations.

The following is a list of the principal objects :–

Brooch.–Shape taken from the carved wooden masks used by the medicine men of the Chillkat Indians, Alaska. Brown pearls from Tennessee.

Brooch.–Shape after the decoration in basket work of the Hupa Indians, California. Pink pearls from the Miami River, Ohio.

Brooch.–Shape from the decorated horse-hide shields used in warfare by the Sioux Indians. Dakota pearls from the Cumberland River, Tenn., and emeralds.

Brooch.–Chrysanthemum, rubies, diamonds and canary brilliant.

Brooch.–.Decoration, study from the Sitka Indians (Esquimaux), Alaska. Tourmaline from Maine.

Brooch.–Decoration, " Bur Marigold," wild flower of the Southern United States. Pearls from Tennessee.

Brooch.–Decoration, study from the Sitka Indians (Esquimaux), Alaska. Tourmaline from Maine, and golden beryl from Connecticut.

Brooch.–Decoration, study from the American shell bark (hickory nut). Garnets from Arizona.

Brooch.–Pearls from the Miami River, Ohio, and green sapphires from Montana.

Brooch.–Decoration, " Florida Palm." Aquamarine and Tourmaline from Maine and garnets from Arizona.

Brooch.–Black pearls from Lower California.

Brooch.–Decoration " Aster." Cinnamon diamonds and sapphires in decarbonised steel.

Brooch.–Green pearls from the Cumberland River, Tenn.

Ring,–Decoration and shape taken from the Navajos Indians, New Mexico. Sapphire.

Ring.–Decoration, study from basket work of the Hupa Indians, California. Tourmaline from Maine.

Ring.–Decoration, Sioux Indians ; study of " Prairie Wolf."

Ring.–Decoration, " Arrow-leafed Violet." Pearls from the Miami River, Ohio, and sapphires from Montana.

Ring.–Decoration, study from the Indians. Garnets from Arizona.

Ring.–Decoration, study from the Sitka Indians, Alaska. Garnets from Arizona.

Ring.–Ruby en cabochon from India and pearl from Miami River, Ohio.

Ring.–Pink pearl from the Miami River, Ohio, and brilliants from Brazil, South America.

Ring.–Pearl from the Miami River, Ohio, and brilliants from Brazil, South America.

Vinaigrette.–Decoration, " Forget-me-not " and diamonds. Watch set in top.

Vinaigrette and Bonbonniere. --Decoration, " Bunch of Violets."

Vinaigrette.–Decoration, gold filigree and rough sapphire rock crystal from North Carolina.

Vinaigrette.–Decoration, diamond and enamel smoky rock crystal from North Carolina.

Vinaigrette.–" Rosebud," decoration in gold ; study from Chillkat Indians. Rock crystal, diamonds, emeralds and moonstones from North Carolina.

Vinaigrette.–Bear and bee, decorative Japanese "American gold" smoky rock crystal from Colorado.
Vinaigrette.–" Trumpet Creeper," gold and enamel.

Sleeve Links.–Decoration, study from the Navajos Indians, New Mexico. Garnets from Arizona and Amazon stone from Virginia.

Sleeve Buttons.–Decoration, study from the Sioux Indians. Moonstones from Virginia.

Sleeve Buttons.–Decoration, study from the Zuni Indians. Opal agate from Mexico.

Sleeve Links.–Decoration, Hupa Indian ; study from the dentalium shell used as wampum or money. Hollaftonite from New York.

Sleeve Links.–Decoration, study from the Cherokee Indians. Amazon stone from Virginia.

Sleeve Links.–Decoration, study from the Inuit Indians, Alaska.

Sleeve Links.–Decoration, study from quilt work of the Sioux Indians, Dakota. Rhodonite from Massachusetts.

Sleeve Links.–Decoration, study from the Navajos Indians, New Mexico. Wollastonite from New York and fossil coral from Iowa.

Sleeve Links.–Decoration, study from the Inuits, Alaska. Fossil coral from Iowa.

Sleeve Links.–Decoration, study from the Sitka Indians, Alaska.

Sleeve Links.–Ruby en cabochon and jade ; East Indian.

Lace Pin.– "Heliotrope." Enamel and diamonds.

Lace Pin.– "Mignonette." Enamel and diamonds.

Lace Pin.–" Sweet Elysium." Enamel and diamonds.

Lace Pin.–Decoration, cactus, New Mexico. Emerald from North Carolina and pearls from Tennessee.

Scarf Pin.–Light green pearl (Lower California) and rattlesnake, United States.

Watch and Chatelaine.–Style, First Empire. Enamel, diamonds and peridots.

Watch and Chain.–Decoration, " Hungarian."

Watch.–Decoration, " Apple Blossom." Rose diamonds.

Watch and Chain.–Lapis lazuli, rose diamonds and rose topaz.

Watch.–Decoration, " Fringed Gentian," United States. Sapphires and diamonds.

Pendant. – Decoration, study from the Chillkat Indians, Alaska. Cinnamon diamonds.

Pendant.–Decoration, canvasback duck. Aquamarine from Maine and brown diamonds from Brazil.

Pendant.–Decoration, study from basket-work of the Navajos Indians, New Mexico. Garnets from Arizona and spessartite garnet from Virginia.

Pendant Bonbonniere.–Sapphires.

Necklace and Pendant.–Pearls from the Miami River, Ohio. and from the Cumberland River, Tenn.

River Brilliant Necklace and Pendant.–Decoration, hazelnut bud.

Diamond Necklace.–Decoration, United States. Study from flower " Mountain Fringe."

Diamond Necklace.–Style, " Colonial," 1776.

Diamond Necklace.–Style, "Empire," 1800.

Bracelet.–Garnet from Arizona and Tourmaline from Maine.

Bonbonniere.–Agurite, malachite and rough garnets from Arizona.

Bonbonniere.–Turquoise from New Mexico and rock crystal from North Carolina.

Bonbonniere.–Gold and enamel. Pearls from Tennessee.

Bonbonniere.–Decorations, Limoges enamel, fait a la point in gold.

Match Box.–Decoration, study from the Hupa Indians, California. Turquoise from New Mexico.

Match Box.–Decoration, Chillkat Indians ; study of a " Crow." Abalone pearls from California and Turquoises from New Mexico. Iron and gold.

Match Box.–Decoration, study from the Zuni Indians, in gold and enamelled rhodonite from Massachusetts.

Hair Ornaments.–Sapphires and Rose diamonds.

Card Case.–Lizard skin, natural colour, from America. Gold wire work with sapphires.

Purse.–Decoration, chased gold and pearls woven in bead work of the Sioux Indians. Pearls from the Cumberland River, Tenn.

Scarf Pin.–Purple pearls from the Cumberland River, Tenn.



Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st June 1889

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sun Oct 19, 2014 4:36 am

A five-story fireproof structure located at 11-15 Union Square and owned for over 40 years by Tiffany & Co., jewelers, was sold last Thursday to Frederick Krown, a real estate operator. The building was constructed by Tiffany & Co. over 40 years ago at a cost of over $300,000, upon land leased from the Van Buren estate. Tiffany & Co. occupied the building as its retail establishment for many.years, when this section of the city was the exclusive retail shopping district. Albert B. Ashforth, Inc., negotiated the sale of the building.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 27th September 1922

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Tue Oct 21, 2014 5:18 am

Death of Hayward S. Cozzens

The announcement Friday, of the death at Lakewood, N. J., Thursday evening of Hayward S. Cozzens, with Tiffany & Co., caused genuine grief among a wide circle of people connected with the New York jewelry trade. His popularity was not limited to his immediate associates in the business; it extended all over the house of Tiffany & Co., wherever his sunny temperament had a chance to shed its lustre and his generosity an opportunity to do an act of kindness.

Hayward S. Cozzens went with Tiffany & Co. when a boy, 23 years ago, and held a position which for many years brought him in contact with the principal manufacturers of jewelry in the country. There was perhaps no one better known in the trade or more liked for his amiable qualities. He was an enthusiastic sportsman, and spent much of his leisure time preparing for his annual Summer outing in the woods, where he was wont to camp and hunt or fish; and to this pleasure he finally sacrificed his life. While camping in Maine last August he contracted a cold, which developed into typhoid fever. He lingered for a long time between life and death, and late in the Fall rallied sufficiently to be taken to Lakewood, where other complications set in. On Christmas his associates at the store sent him a beautiful vase filled with fresh cut flowers; but in his rapidly sinking condition he never learned of their thoughtfulness, and on Thursday evening, at 8 o'clock, he passed away.

Mr. Cozzens was a warm advocate and organizer of societies intended for mutual benefit, and was instrumental in bringing nearly 200 members into the Jewelers' League. He was about 36 years of age and unmarried. His body was brought to New York, and buried from the residence of his sister, at 22 W. 60th St.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 3rd January 1894

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Wed Oct 22, 2014 7:18 am

Tiffany & Co. placed on exhibition their celebrated collection of sapphires, and large numbers of the residents of New York who admire precious stones viewed the display with great satisfaction. The collection embraced the rarest colors in which these gems are found. Among them are red, violet and purple. The stones have been derived from nearly every part of the world and were specially arranged for exhibition by Geo. F. Kunz, the gem expert of the house.

Source: The Trader and Canadian Jeweller - December 1890

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Fri Oct 24, 2014 5:49 am

Charles L. Tiffany and Charles T. Cook, of the firm of Tiffany & Co., have taken title for a consideration of $135,000 n the plot of seven lots, extending easterly from the northeast corner of Fifth avenue and Ninety-ninth street.

Source: The Jewelers Review - 7th June 1899

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Thu Oct 30, 2014 5:05 am

We have received several letters complaining of the transactions of E. P. Tiffany & Co., of 195 Fulton street. This firm was in the habit of soliciting orders from the country for jewelry, receiving the money and never sending either goods or money in return. Finally the firm sold their business through alleged misrepresentation to I. A. Smith for $2,500 and then left the State. When Mr. Smith found out that he had been swindled, he was obliged to make an assignment to J. M. Chapman, who announces that the assets are between $700 and $800 of which $600 is preferred. This bogus firm of Tiffany & Co. did quite an extensive business, as country people supposed they were dealing with the old and well known house of Tiffany & Co., of Union Square. This latter firm received many letters of complaint, and the police and postal authorities were notified of the swindling transactions of E. P. Tiffany & Co., but the birds had flown before they could be arrested. It is an old trick of adventurers to copy as nearly as they dare the name of some well known firm and delude the public with bogus wares or swindling schemes. Such rascals are classed in the same category as " sawdust swindlers " and " bunco steerers," and as it is impossible to forewarn the public regarding each one, it is necessary to be constantly on the alert for them and expose them when they are found out.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 1884

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Mon Nov 03, 2014 4:23 am

A MYSTERIOUS INCIDENT

Valuable Diamond Necklace Hit by a Bullet and Several Gems Damaged

Philadelphia, July 15.–Mystery surrounds the shattering of a $100,000 necklace by a bullet fired into the package in which it had been sent from Tiffany's, New York, to the Radnor, Pa., home of the Gurnee Munns, fashionable Philadelphia society folks.

Who fired the bullet, when it was fired, and the reason for the vandalism are a puzzle to the police of this city and New York, who are making an investigation.

The damage to the necklace is estimated at between $3,000 and $5,000. Several of the largest stones of the necklace, a family heirloom in the Munn family, were broken to small pieces.

The damage to the necklace, which had been shipped by express by Tiffany & Co., and addressed to Mrs. Gurnee Munn, at Radnor, was announced only today, although discovered a week ago.

Though addressed to Mrs. Gurnee Munn, who, before her marriage, was Marie Louise Wanamaker, daughter of Rodman Wanamaker, the necklace belonged to her mother-in-law, Mrs. Charles A. Munn, of Washington.

It had been left by Gurnee Munn with Tiffany & Co. in New York to be repaired and stored. When he saw it next was when he opened the express package at his home and found some of the gems shattered and a .38 calibre bullet in the parcel.

The Munns say they are at a loss to explain it. Tiffany & Co. say the necklace was in perfect condition when it left and the express company that delivered the precious jewels disclaim responsibility also.

"The necklace was a very large and beautiful one," Mrs. Munn said today. "I do not know how much it cost, but I believe it is worth at least $100,000.
"My husband left the necklace at Tiffany & Co. six months ago to be cleaned and stored. It was being sent back and was addressed to me when the bullet was fired through the package.

"I was not at home when the package arrived. Mr. Munn opened it and, finding three or four of the diamonds were shattered by a bullet, sent the necklace back to Tiffany & Co. Two of the diamonds damaged were among the largest in the string. The bullet was found in the box and nothing had been taken from the package.

"Though I have not the slightest idea how the bullet was fired into the jewel box, it is believed to have occurred while the package was in transit on the train."

The diamond necklace now is in the hands of Tiffany & Co.

At the establishment of Tiffany & Co., 37th St. and Fifth Ave.. New York, a Jewelers' Circular reporter was unable to obtain any statement regarding the mysterious shooting into the jewel case and the smashing of several valuable diamonds.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 21st July 1920

Trev.


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