Irish Retailer Marks--Long Term Project

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dognose
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Postby dognose » Thu Aug 20, 2009 10:32 am

Updated list, some new names and dates.

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Note, the William Atches name that was on the previous list, has been identified by Miles as William Atcheson. Atcheson is noted as working out of 109, Grafton Street, he registered at the Dublin Assay Office in 1856.

Trev.
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Granmaa
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Postby Granmaa » Tue Sep 08, 2009 5:28 pm

Marsh: found on an 1864 egg spoon by John Smyth.

Miles

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dognose
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Postby dognose » Thu Sep 10, 2009 2:19 pm

Hi Miles,

That's very likely to be Charles Marsh Jnr. noted in street directories as being at 30, Sackville Street, Lower in 1850.

He was presumably the son of the silversmith Charles Marsh who registered in 1816.

Trev.
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dognose
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Postby dognose » Wed Sep 16, 2009 6:40 am

For a better understanding of the unusual relationship between the makers and the retailers of Irish silverware see:

viewtopic.php?t=17535

The testimonies of Jacob West and Richard Williams reveal much about how the tail wagged the dog.

Trev.
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dognose
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Postby dognose » Thu Sep 24, 2009 4:55 pm

Retailers mark of Keene on a George Nagle teaspoon hallmarked at Dublin in 1815.

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Photo courtsey Andy Taylor

This is likely to be John Keene II, the son of John Keene, the former Master of the Dublin Goldsmiths Company in 1801.

John Keene II was apprenticed to his father in 1802, and it would appear that he took control of the firm following the death of his father in 1807. It is somewhat doubtful if he completed his apprenticeship, he could not have commenced the seven years of learning the trade until the later part of 1802 as his father, as Master, was not allowed to practice his craft whilst serving in the position of Master of the Company, and it would be an unlikely scenario that he would have been bound to another master to complete his apprenticeship and run his own company at the same time.

This is only the second example of Keene's mark that I have noted, both have been on George Nagle spoons, the previous one hallmarked in 1813.

Trev.
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dognose
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Postby dognose » Sun Sep 27, 2009 8:44 am

Retailer's mark of Gilbert & Son struck on a John Smyth teaspoon assayed at Dublin in 1856.

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Photo courtsey of Dan Froggatt

I'm unsure of Gilbert & Son, but there could be a connection with W. Gilbert, listed as 'Commercial Agent', who was known to stamp silverware with a 'W. Gilbert' mark.

Trev.
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dognose
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Postby dognose » Sun Oct 11, 2009 1:46 pm

Retailer's mark of Donegan noted on a John Smyth teaspoon assayed at Dublin in 1899.

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Photo courtsey of Martin Hollings

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Granmaa
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Postby Granmaa » Thu Oct 15, 2009 9:56 am

Twycross on an 1833 Edward Power spoon.

Miles

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dognose
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Postby dognose » Thu Oct 15, 2009 7:29 pm

Advertisment for West & Son from 1892.

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dognose
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Postby dognose » Tue Oct 20, 2009 1:37 pm

The earliest example of an Irish retailers mark that I have come across.

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Photo courtesy Gary Bottomley

This is the mark of John/Joseph Ash (Ashe) of 8, Capel Street, Dublin. It was noted on a set of Old English Thread dinner forks, assayed at Dublin in 1789 and attributed to John Dalrymple as the maker.

The previous earliest example that I had seen was also that of Ash's mark noted was on a John Power spoon dateing to 1792. So perhaps John Ash was the first retailer to latch on to this permanent form of advertising.

Trev.
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Last edited by dognose on Mon Jan 18, 2010 6:14 am, edited 1 time in total.

Granmaa
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Postby Granmaa » Sat Oct 24, 2009 6:26 pm

A new one and some old ones with new dates or makers.

Miles

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dognose
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Postby dognose » Sun Oct 25, 2009 3:29 pm

New blood! I make that two new examples, W. Mosley and Adams.

W. Mosley is perhaps to identified with James Mosley of Waterford in business some sixty years later, noted by Mike and appearing in Jackson (p.650).

Adams has not come up so far. What is the maker's mark on that one? It looks like 'EB', if so, it's a bit of a Irish rarity, a female silversmith, Elizabeth Bainbridge. I think only about half a dozen female silversmiths where ever recorded in Ireland.

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Postby Granmaa » Sun Oct 25, 2009 6:46 pm

I thought it was Edward Power's mark.

Mark
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Postby MCB » Mon Oct 26, 2009 12:34 pm

Hello Miles,

I've not previously seen the IL mark with two pellets nor the IK mark with (what appears to be) a pellet. Do you have any detail as to who registered these please?

Regards,
Mike
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Granmaa
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Postby Granmaa » Mon Oct 26, 2009 1:05 pm

I think the I.L. mark is in fact I.L.B for James Le Bas.
I don't know about IK.

Miles
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dognose
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Postby dognose » Tue Oct 27, 2009 2:19 pm

Agree with Miles, a badly struck mark for James Le Bas. The 'IK' mark is very likely to be one of the marks used by John Kavanagh whose business was taken over by William Mooney.

See: viewtopic.php?t=16498

Trev.
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MCB
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Postby MCB » Wed Oct 28, 2009 8:02 am

Thanks to you both. Kavanagh added to my lists.

Mike
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dognose
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Postby dognose » Sat Nov 28, 2009 9:23 am

Here are some details of James Mosley's establishment, perhaps to be connected with Miles's 'W. Mosley' mark.

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This information was published in 1892 (the same year as noted in Jackson's p.650) and as can be seen the firm was founded in 1832 by James Mosley's grandfather, whose name, unfortunately they omit to mention. But as Miles's spoon bears an assay date of 1830-1, unless there is a discrepancy in the 1832 date, then the connection is a doubtful one, however, as the dates are so close, then it's worth leaving the door open on this one.

Trev.
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dognose
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Postby dognose » Wed Dec 02, 2009 2:33 pm

The 'T. Bennet' found on a James Le Bas spoon, assayed in 1840 mentioned in an earlier post in this thread is likely to be that of Thomas Bennett of 75, Grafton Street, Dublin.

Thomas Bennett was an exhibitor at the Great Exhibition of 1851 at London. Under Section III, Class 23, Works in Precious Metals, Jewellery etc. He entered the following items:

Ark of the covenant, in silver.
Silver-chased large salver.
Presentation cup.
Chased claret jug.
Engraved claret jug.
Chased Dresden pattern tea-kettle and stand.
Engraved hexagon tea-kettle and stand.
Dresden tea and coffee service.
Hexagon tea and coffee service.
Plain hexagon tea and coffee service, with Irish wolfdog button.
Chased scroll and flower tea and coffee service.
Chased and engraved children's cans.
Antique chased and pierced salt cellars, with mustard pot.
Antique and chased dessert sugar baskets.
Small melon bachelor tea-pot.
Plain Pompeii cream jug.

The above articles have been manufactured from silver obtained from the mines of Ireland.

Case containing fine gold jewellery and bog oak, all manufactured out of Wicklow gold and Irish pearls. In this collection is a newly-invented flexible gold bracelet, suited for either a watch or miniature; exhibited for novelty.


Trev.
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dognose
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Postby dognose » Fri Jan 15, 2010 11:59 am

Another example of the retailer's mark of W. Mosley, this one is taken from a dessert spoon made by Laurence Keary (Kearny) of 10, Dame Court, in 1826.

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Keary did not register with the Dublin Company until 1827, although his mark is a often found one, as from 1823. Also registering in 1827 was one William Mossley, perhaps this is the answer to the identity of the mystery retailer.

Trev.
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