Irish Retailer Marks--Long Term Project

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dognose
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Postby dognose » Tue Apr 21, 2009 3:29 pm

Hi Ben,

Thanks for posting the photos.

I make that, John Egan, William Cummins and Christopher Eades.

I'll add them to the list. Good luck with 'Morpie'

Regards Trev.
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Granmaa
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Postby Granmaa » Sat Apr 25, 2009 8:06 pm

A slightly clearer version of Neill's mark found on an 1845 butter knife by Chrostopher Cummins.

Miles

Image
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dognose
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Postby dognose » Sun Apr 26, 2009 4:29 am

Hi Miles,

Thanks for contribution. Keep 'em coming.

Trev.
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dognose
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Postby dognose » Tue May 05, 2009 5:16 pm

Hi,

Updated list, new names and new dates.

*Image deleted, please refer to list in below post.

Trev.
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Last edited by dognose on Wed May 06, 2009 5:22 am, edited 1 time in total.

dognose
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Postby dognose » Wed May 06, 2009 5:20 am

Hi,

Replacement and again updated list, an absolute howler in the last one!

Image

Trev.
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dognose
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Postby dognose » Tue May 19, 2009 6:09 pm

Hi,

I've never seen one like this before.

Image
I am indebted to Michael Baggott for his kind permission for the use of this photograph.

Walter Peter was a jeweller who was noted as working from Peter Place, Charlemont Street in 1796-1801 and from 102, Grafton Street in 1802. He was a Freeman in 1794, registered in 1799, elected Warden 1800-1803 and Master of the Company of Goldsmiths of Dublin 1806-1807. He was elected to the Common Council of the City of Dublin in 1807, 1813 and 1825. He died in 1845.

We now know from this piece that he was working out of 108, Grafton Street in 1812.

This mark was found on an 8 1/2" table fork made by James Scott.

Trev.
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dognose
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Postby dognose » Fri May 22, 2009 2:11 pm

Another mark example from William Gibson & Co. Ltd. of Belfast.

Image

Trev.
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dognose
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Postby dognose » Wed Jun 17, 2009 2:39 pm

Example of West & Son as maker and retailer, Dublin 1915.

Image
Photo courtesy of Derek Purdom.

Trev.
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Granmaa
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Postby Granmaa » Thu Jun 18, 2009 11:19 am

Here's another of those address marks. It's from an 1842 teaspoon by a maker I don't recognise.

It looks like
W. Brod???
Essex Quay

I was interested to see on this page that Essex Quay is also where Thomas Morpie was working.

Miles

Image Image
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dognose
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Postby dognose » Thu Jun 18, 2009 2:04 pm

Hi Miles,

Essex Quay must have been the most amazing place in the first half of the 19th Century. If you check through the street numbers in 'Wilson's Dublin Directory' at:

viewtopic.php?t=16498

you will notice that the entire street was possibly the hub of the silver trade in Dublin, the missing numbers that I didn't include were the premises of such trades as Ivory Turners and the like.

William Brodrick is listed in the above Directory as a Watch & Clockmaker of 3, Essex Quay. He is noted as working out of 4, Essex Quay in 1818, 3, Essex Quay in 1827 and 12, Essex Quay in 1837, where he remained until 1866. He registered with the Dublin Assay Office in 1825.

Image

As for the maker, my first thought was Samuel Green of Cork who was known to have his work assayed at Dublin, but I think he was dead by 1842. Samuel Garre is a possibility, he registered in 1828.

Regards Trev.
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dognose
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Postby dognose » Sat Jun 20, 2009 5:54 pm

Hi Miles,

The maker is most likely to be Samuel Garre. Thom's Directory of Ireland has both Garre and Broderick (Brodrick) listed as working in the same time (1850). Garre is listed at 34, Ranelagh and Broderick at 16, Essex Quay in that year.

The various street numbers listed for Broderick over the years may not necessarily indicate that he moved on several occasions, but may simply be a re-numbering of the street.

Regards Trev.
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JAKJO
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Postby JAKJO » Tue Jun 23, 2009 6:08 pm

Hi Trev,

An interesting and fascinating project indeed.

Earlier today I read and answered questions at a Swedish forum, http://www.antikviteter.net/antikprat/ on this ladle by Thomas Farnell, made in 1823 and found and bought in the deep forests of Northern Sweden in Hälsingland at a farm auction.

I got the permission to post it here from the owner, who is now reading and searching The Book of Family Crests by J.P. Elven.

Law - Farnell (Fernell, Farnett) in 1823 does not change the timespan you have recorded, but I cannot find the retailer mark of Law on the site.

Hope this helps,

Best regards/JAKJO
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JAKJO
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Postby JAKJO » Tue Jun 23, 2009 6:18 pm

Image
Image
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dognose
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Postby dognose » Wed Jul 01, 2009 5:08 am

Hi Jakjo,

Many thanks for posting the image.

William Law the son of William Law, was apprenticed to William Townsend of 16, Fishamble Street, Dublin in 1765. It is noted that the firm of Law was working from 1766, so it is likely that William Law Senior started the business then, at 20, Cole Alley, Castle Street where they remained until 1785, they then moved to 3, Parliament Street; 1786-1798, then 1&2 Sackville Street in 1798. They also had premises at 1 Cutpurse Row, Thomas Street as from 1804.

William Law's (2) son, Matthew was apprenticed to him in 1802, and the firm became known as William Law & Son in 1815.

William Law (2) died in 1820, with most likely Matthew Law assuming control at that point and being the retailer of this ladle.

It's fascinating to think of the history of this piece and its journey from Dublin to the forests of Northern Sweden.

Regards Trev.
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dognose
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Postby dognose » Thu Jul 02, 2009 4:48 pm

The rarest of the rare, a provincial retailer noted on a desert spoon by William Cummins, assayed at Dublin in 1839

Image

Image
Photo courtesy of Chris

Matthew William Rowe, Silversmith, of 48, Dublin Street, Carlow, Co. Carlow, appears in 'The New Commercial Directory for the Town of Carlow-1839'

Trev.
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dognose
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Postby dognose » Tue Jul 14, 2009 3:24 pm

Suspect this is the 'Donegan' noted as the retailer on some items.

Image

John Donegan is noted as working out of 19, Exchange Street Lower in 1839, 25, Essex Quay in 1842, 5, Ormond Quay in 1853 and 32, Dame Street in 1861. He was in partnership James Wickham from 1842-1846 and in another partnership known as Donegan & Wright in 1848.

His brother Patrick who took over the business following John's death, is noted as working out of 9, Essex Quay in 1846 and 32, Dame Street for the period 1865-1887.

Source: Catholic Directory, Almanac and Registry of Ireland, England and Scotland--1865

Trev.
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dognose
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Postby dognose » Sun Aug 09, 2009 3:21 pm

This is John Asken, noted at 10, Sackville Street Upper from 1842-1861.

Image
Photo courtesy of Andy

Trev.
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MCB
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Postby MCB » Mon Aug 10, 2009 5:45 am

Hello All,
Can anyone please throw light on who registered the PW mark shown above?
Two Dublin silversmiths who were probably active in 1842-3 were, according to Jackson's page 647, Peter Weekes and Peter Walsh but both are shown to have registered PW in a rectangle without the central pellet.
Thanks,
Mike
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dognose
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Postby dognose » Mon Aug 10, 2009 6:28 am

Hi Mike,

Although I have never dug that deep into the identity of the PW marks, I have always thought that much silver attributed to Peter Walsh was in reality that of Philip Weekes.

Of Weekes a fair bit is known, of Walsh, it appears very little. Weekes was an established silversmith, fomerly an apprentice of Samuel Neville, he was indentured in 1804, a Freeman in 1811 and Registered with the Company in 1816, he was at that date noted as working at 9, Mary's Abbey and at 22, Eustace Street in 1833. He is noted in street directories until 1848.

I cannot find a record of Walsh being noted as a Freeman, but Jackson has note of him in directories in 1808 as a Jeweller.

There is still much research to be done into the lives of the smiths such as these, but for me, at the moment, I would always go with Weekes above Walsh unless there was some evidence to the contrary.

Regards Trev.
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MCB
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Postby MCB » Mon Aug 10, 2009 9:46 am

Hello Trev,
Page 647 of my Jackson's noted thanks.
Hopefully we will hear further regarding attribution of the 1842-3 mark shown on the silver pictured above but for now am listing it as possibly a previously unrecorded mark of P Weekes.
Regards,
Mike
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